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This is getting extremely irritating. Right now I have a winforms application, and things were not working right, but no exceptions were being thrown as far as I could tell. After stepping through almost all pieces of relevant code, it turns out that an exception was being thrown at the start of my application.

Long story short, in WinForms, being as awesome as it is, if an exception occurs the WinForms library ignores it. No "an unhandled exception has occurred" JIT message is thrown, it just stops processing the current event and goes back to the GUI.

This is causing random bugs, because code to load data isn't being called due to the exception occurring prior to this data being loaded.

To see this in action I created a brand new WinForms application, and entered the following code:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        string blah = null;
        blah.Trim();
    }
}

Press F5 and the form loads without any errors showing, even though a null reference is being thrown.

I then tried to go to my Program.cs main method and add Application.SetUnhandledExceptionMode(UnhandledExceptionMode.ThrowException); to it. Still my form loads without causing any errors to be thrown.

Even though I know that I can tell VS to break on all exceptions, I find this situation really bad. It causes really wierd issues that are hard to debug in production, and as this is an internal tool I really want to have it so it actually errors out when an exception occurs, and not silently disregards it.

Does anyone know how to do this?


Update: Just to update on things I have learned from the comments.

This does appear to be a 64-bit issue with windows, as I learned from this question which I did not see before posting. In that question it pointed to a Microsoft bug report about this, which had this to say:

Hello,

This bug was closed as "External" because this behavior results from how x64 version of Windows handle exceptions. When a user mode exception crosses a kernel transition, x64 versions of Windows do not allow the exception to propagate. Therefore attached debuggers are unaware of the fact that an exception occured resulting in the debugger failing to break on the unhandled exception.

Unfortunately where is nothing that the Visual Studo team can do to address this, it is the result of operating system design. All feedback regarding this issue should be addressed to the Windows team; however the Windows team considers this to be the "correct" operating system design, and considers the x86 behavior to be "incorrect".

Best Regards, Visual Studio Debugger

That being said, builds not run through visual studio (or using Ctrl+F5 to run) does seem to show the JIT exception message box EXCEPT if you have the following code in your Program.cs:

Application.SetUnhandledExceptionMode(UnhandledExceptionMode.ThrowException);

That code will cause windows to ignore the exception.

However, if you (instead) subscribe to the Application.ThreadException event, not only will your exceptions be caught, visual studio's debugger will break on unhandled exceptions!

share|improve this question
    
did you try to subscribe to Application.UnhandledException ? –  Tigran Sep 27 '11 at 17:13
    
@Tigran: bad idea, IMHO ...I did that once ... –  IAbstract Sep 27 '11 at 17:15
    
Are you sure you subscribe to the Form.Load event? ...just a sanity check ;) –  IAbstract Sep 27 '11 at 17:17
1  
    
Interesting link, and while everything matches that question, my platform is already set to x86 and it doesn't fix it –  KallDrexx Sep 27 '11 at 17:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In your Program.cs' Main function you should also ensure that you've wrapped your call to open the form in a try/catch. Additionally use the AppDomain.UnhandledException to catch exceptions. We also add Application.ThreadException too.

I believe the following will give you hooks into all the exceptions that can be thrown...

static void Main()
{
    try
    {
        System.Windows.Forms.Application.SetUnhandledExceptionMode(UnhandledExceptionMode.CatchException);
        System.Windows.Forms.Application.ThreadException += new System.Threading.ThreadExceptionEventHandler(OnGuiUnhandedException);
        AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += OnUnhandledException;

        var form = new MainForm();
        form.ShowDialog();
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        HandleUnhandledException(e);
    }
    finally
    {
        // Do stuff
    }
}

private static void HandleUnhandledException(Object o)
{
    // TODO: Log it!
    Exception e = o as Exception;

    if (e != null)
    {

    }
}

private static void OnUnhandledException(Object sender, UnhandledExceptionEventArgs e)
{
    HandleUnhandledException(e.ExceptionObject);
}

private static void OnGuiUnhandedException(object sender, System.Threading.ThreadExceptionEventArgs e)
{
    HandleUnhandledException(e.Exception);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note: There are probably better ways to go about intercepting all this stuff, but the above will at least catch everything... Whether its good practice to do so I'll leave up to other commentators to decide... –  Reddog Sep 27 '11 at 17:19

Try the following.

This is the code snippet:

[STAThread]
public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    try
    {
        Application.ThreadException += new ThreadExceptionEventHandler(Application_ThreadException);
        //your program entry point
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
       //manage also these exceptions
    }
}

private void Application_ThreadException(object sender, ThreadExceptionEventArgs e)
{
    ProcessException(e.Exception);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Subscribing to the ThreadExceptionEventHandler actually does cause the debugger to break on unhandled exceptions! Now the question turns to what to do in the Application_ThreadException method –  KallDrexx Sep 27 '11 at 17:35
    
Excellent solution. –  Nico May 15 '12 at 15:27

An easy fix is not to run under the debugger.

The debugger is masking the exception for some reason. If you run your app normally (Ctrl+F5), you'll get the usual "Unhandled exception has occurred in your application... Continue/Quit?" dialog.

share|improve this answer
    
Ctrl+F5 still has the same issue. No exception is thrown –  KallDrexx Sep 27 '11 at 17:18
    
Throws just fine on my box, using your sample code. What OS are you running, and is it 32- or 64-bit? Is your project 32-bit or AnyCPU? What version of Visual Studio are you running, and what version of .NET are you building against? –  Joe White Sep 27 '11 at 17:20
    
64 bit, paltform target x86 VS 2010, .Net 4 –  KallDrexx Sep 27 '11 at 17:21
    
Same here. Running on Windows 7. Dunno what you're doing differently, but if I use your sample code, and run without debugging, I get the unhandled-exception dialog right away. –  Joe White Sep 27 '11 at 17:24
2  
FYI, if you have Application.SetUnhandledExceptionMode(UnhandledExceptionMode.ThrowException); in your Program.cs, then even ctrl+f5 won't show the exception (that's why I did not see it the first time you suggested it) –  KallDrexx Sep 27 '11 at 17:41

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