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I almost feel like saying "it's me again!".

Anyway, here we go.

I like using while $object->next() style constructs. They appeal to me and seem "neat".

Now, when the thing I'm iterating over is an array, it's straightforward ("shift @ary or return undef")

sub next {
   my ( $self, $args ) = @_;
   my $next = shift @{ $self->{list_of_things} } or return undef;
   my ( $car, $engine_size, $color )
       = split( /\Q$opts->{fieldsep}/, $next );
   $self->car         = $host;
   $self->engine_size = $engine_size;
   $self->color       = $color;

}

In this example I use AUTOLOAD to create the getters and setters and then have those instance variables available in my object during the while loop.

I'd like to do something similar but with the "list_of_things" being a %hash.

Here's a non-OO example that doesn't make it into the first iteration. Any ideas why?

(The total "list_of_things" is not that big - maybe 100 entries - so to do a keys(%{$hash}) every time doesn't seem too wasteful to me).

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my $list_of_things = {
    volvo => {
        color => "red",
        engine_size => 2000,
    },
    bmw => {
        color => "black",
        engine_size => 2500,
    },
    mini => {
        color => "british racing green",
        engine_size => 1200,
    }
};

sub next {
    my $args = $_;
    my @list = keys( %{$list_of_things} );
    return undef if scalar @list == "0";
    my $next = $list_of_things->{ $list[0] };
    delete $list_of_things->{ $list[0] };
    return $next;
}

while ( next()) {
    print Dumper $_;
    print scalar keys %{ $list_of_things }
}

Is there a better way of doing this? Am I doing something crazy?

EDIT:

I tried Ikegami's suggestion. Of course, Ikegami's example works flawlessly. When I try and abstract a little, so that all that is exposed to the object is a next->() method, I get the same "perl-going-to-100%-cpu" problem as in my original example.

Here's a non-OO example:

use Data::Dumper qw( Dumper );

sub make_list_iter {
   my @list = @_;
   return sub { @list ? shift(@list) : () };
}

sub next {
   make_list_iter( keys %$hash );
}

my $hash = { ... };

while ( my ($k) = next->() ) {
   print Dumper $hash->{$k};
}

It does not seem to get past the first step of the while() loop.

I am obviously missing something here...

share|improve this question
1  
There's a ton of CPAN modules that will do this for you... List::Gen, Array::Iterator, etc. Why reinvent the wheel? –  Zaid Sep 27 '11 at 17:22
    
@zaid - Good point... And I agree. There are two reasons: * I am not able to use external modules without them going through an extended process to get blessed by security * I want to understand! –  wawawawa Sep 27 '11 at 18:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you don't want to rely on the hash's builtin iterator (used by each, keys and values), there's nothing stopping you from making your own.

use Data::Dumper qw( Dumper );

sub make_list_iter {
   my @list = @_;
   return sub { @list ? shift(@list) : () };
}

my $list_of_things = { ... };

my $i = make_list_iter(keys %$list_of_things);
while (my ($k) = $i->()) {
   local $Data::Dumper::Terse  = 1;
   local $Data::Dumper::Indent = 0;
   say "$k: " . Dumper($list_of_things->{$k});
}
share|improve this answer
    
A quick note on my ($k) = $i->() vs my $k = $i->(), the latter won't work if one of your keys is false (e.g. "0", ""), but the former will. –  ikegami Sep 28 '11 at 3:35

Well, if you don't need $list_of_things for later, you can always do something like

while(keys %$list_of_things)
{
  my $temp=(sort keys %$list_of_things)[0];
  print "key: $temp, value array: " . join(",",@{$list_of_things->{$temp}}) . "\n";
  delete $list_of_things->{$temp};
}

And if you do need it, you can always assign it to a temporary hash reference and perform the same while loop on it.

share|improve this answer

The each operator is a builtin that iterates over hashes. It returns undef when it runs out of elements to return. So you could so something like

package SomeObject;

# creates new object instance
sub new {
    my $class = shift;
    return bless { hash_of_things => { @_ } }, $class
}

sub next {
    my $self = shift;
    my ($key,$value) = each %{ $self->{hash_of_things} };
    return $key;  # or return $value
}

Calling keys on the hash will reset the each iterator. It's good to know this so you can reset it on purpose:

sub reset {
    my $self = shift;
    keys %{ $self->{hash_of_things} }
}

and so you can avoid resetting it on accident.

The section on tie'ing hashes in perltie also has an example like this.

share|improve this answer
    
I know all about each. I just didn't think that it would work when called within a method... I think it will be fine for what I need. Thanks! –  wawawawa Sep 27 '11 at 18:16
1  
@wawawawa it's okay as long as no one else calls each %$obj, keys %$obj, or values %$obj on your object. Which they shouldn't be doing anyway. :) –  hobbs Sep 27 '11 at 19:39

Here's how List::Gen could be used to create an iterator from a list:

use strict;
use warnings;
use List::Gen 'makegen';

my @list_of_things = (   # This structure is more suitable IMO
    {
        make        => 'volvo',
        color       => 'red',
        engine_size => 2000,
    },
    {
        make        => 'bmw',
        color       => 'black',
        engine_size => 2500,
    },
    {
        make        => 'mini',
        color       => 'british racing green',
        engine_size => 1200,
    }
);

my $cars = makegen @list_of_things;

print $_->{make}, "\n" while $cars->next;
share|improve this answer
    
No need to change the data structure. my $iter = makegen keys %$list_of_things; would do the trick. –  ikegami Sep 28 '11 at 1:24
    
makegen has a (\@) prototype so it takes a real array. I just released a new version of List::Gen that among many other things, makes it easier to use lists directly. You could write my $iter = list keys %$list_of_things; –  Eric Strom Sep 29 '11 at 15:54

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