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Please clarify two things for me:

  1. Can a Foreign key be NULL?
  2. Can a Foreign key be duplicate?

Please, in support of your answer provide some authentic references or links. As fair as I know, NULL shouldn't be used in foreign keys, but in some application of mine I'm able to input NULL in both Oracle and SQL Server, and I don't know why.

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11  
sql-server AND oracle tags? And an explanation as well? It's homework, isn't it? –  Adrian Carneiro Sep 27 '11 at 18:01
    
@Adrian: Best of my knowledge foreign key cannot be null but it is taking null in sql server and oracle. can you explain why? –  jams Sep 27 '11 at 18:06
    
@Jams - read the link in my answer. –  JNK Sep 27 '11 at 18:07
    
@Jams: oracle is answered, too –  woliveirajr Sep 27 '11 at 18:16
3  
this cannot be deleted because the answers and the question are useful. Feel free to edit the question to improve it. –  Jeff Atwood Sep 29 '11 at 9:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 88 down vote accepted

I want to explain why a foreign key might need to be null or might need to be unique or not unique. First remember a Foreign key simply requires that the value in that field must exist first in a differnt table (the parent table). That is all an FK is by definition. Null by definition is not a value. Null means that we do not yet know what the value is.

Let me give you a real life example. Suppose you have a database that stores sales proposals. Suppose further that each proposal only has one sales person assigned and one client. So your proposal table would have two foreign keys, one with the client Id and one with the salesrepId. However, at the time the record is created, a sales rep is not always assigned (because no one is free to work on it yet), so the client id is filled in but the sales rep id might be null. In other words, usually you need the ability to have a null FK when you may not know its value at the time the data is entered, but you do know other values in the table that need to be entered. To allow nulls in an FK generally all you have to do is allow nulls on the field that has the FK. The null value is separate from the idea of it being an FK.

Whether it is unique or not unique relates to whether the table has a one-one or a one-many relationship to the parent table. Now if you have a one-one relationship, it is possible that you could have the data all in one table, but if the table is getting too wide or if the data is on a different topic (the employee - insurance example @tbone gave for instance), then you want separate tables with a FK. You would then want to make this FK either also the PK (which guarantees uniqueness) or put a unique constraint on it.

Most FKs are for a one to many relationship and that is what you get from a FK without adding a further constraint on the field. So you have an order table and the order details table for instance. If the customer orders ten items at one time, he has one order and ten order detail records that contain the same orderID as the FK.

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+1 for really good, clear, patient mentoring –  Hugh Jones Sep 28 '11 at 8:04
    
So that's intended to be better than having a fake sales person named "Unassigned"? –  Thomas Weller Sep 19 '14 at 8:48

I think foreign key of one table also primary key to some other table.So it won't allows nulls.So there is no question of having null value in foreign key.

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  DLeh Feb 5 at 14:43

Here's an example using Oracle syntax:
First let's create a table COUNTRY

CREATE TABLE TBL_COUNTRY ( COUNTRY_ID VARCHAR2 (50) NOT NULL ) ;
ALTER TABLE TBL_COUNTRY ADD CONSTRAINT COUNTRY_PK PRIMARY KEY ( COUNTRY_ID ) ;

Create the table PROVINCE

CREATE TABLE TBL_PROVINCE(
PROVINCE_ID VARCHAR2 (50) NOT NULL ,
COUNTRY_ID  VARCHAR2 (50)
);
ALTER TABLE TBL_PROVINCE ADD CONSTRAINT PROVINCE_PK PRIMARY KEY ( PROVINCE_ID ) ;
ALTER TABLE TBL_PROVINCE ADD CONSTRAINT PROVINCE_COUNTRY_FK FOREIGN KEY ( COUNTRY_ID ) REFERENCES TBL_COUNTRY ( COUNTRY_ID ) ;

This runs perfectly fine in Oracle. Notice the COUNTRY_ID foreign key in the second table doesn't have "NOT NULL".

Now to insert a row into the PROVINCE table, it's sufficient to only specify the PROVINCE_ID. However, if you chose to specify a COUNTRY_ID as well, it must exist already in the COUNTRY table.

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From the horse's mouth:

Foreign keys allow key values that are all NULL, even if there are no matching PRIMARY or UNIQUE keys ... No Constraints on the Foreign Key When no other constraints are defined on the foreign key, any number of rows in the child table can reference the same parent key value. This model allows nulls in the foreign key. ...

NOT NULL Constraint on the Foreign Key When nulls are not allowed in a foreign key, each row in the child table must explicitly reference a value in the parent key because nulls are not allowed in the foreign key.

Any number of rows in the child table can reference the same parent key value, so this model establishes a one-to-many relationship between the parent and foreign keys. However, each row in the child table must have a reference to a parent key value; the absence of a value (a null) in the foreign key is not allowed. The same example in the previous section can be used to illustrate such a relationship. However, in this case, employees must have a reference to a specific department.

UNIQUE Constraint on the Foreign Key When a UNIQUE constraint is defined on the foreign key, only one row in the child table can reference a given parent key value. This model allows nulls in the foreign key.

This model establishes a one-to-one relationship between the parent and foreign keys that allows undetermined values (nulls) in the foreign key. For example, assume that the employee table had a column named MEMBERNO, referring to an employee membership number in the company insurance plan. Also, a table named INSURANCE has a primary key named MEMBERNO, and other columns of the table keep respective information relating to an employee insurance policy. The MEMBERNO in the employee table must be both a foreign key and a unique key:

To enforce referential integrity rules between the EMP_TAB and INSURANCE tables (the FOREIGN KEY constraint)

To guarantee that each employee has a unique membership number (the UNIQUE key constraint)

UNIQUE and NOT NULL Constraints on the Foreign Key When both UNIQUE and NOT NULL constraints are defined on the foreign key, only one row in the child table can reference a given parent key value, and because NULL values are not allowed in the foreign key, each row in the child table must explicitly reference a value in the parent key.

See this:

Oracle 11g link

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1 - Yes, since at least SQL Server 2000.

2 - Yes, as long as it's not a UNIQUE constraint or linked to a unique index.

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Thanks I am reading it. –  jams Sep 27 '11 at 18:07

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