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EmployeeNumber =
string.IsNullOrEmpty(employeeNumberTextBox.Text)
    ? null
    : Convert.ToInt32(employeeNumberTextBox.Text),

I often find myself wanting to do things like this (EmployeeNumber is a Nullable<int> as it's a property on a LINQ-to-SQL dbml object where the column allows NULL values). Unfortunately, the compiler feels that "There is no implicit conversion between 'null' and 'int'", even though both types would be valid in an assignment operation to a nullable int on their own.

Null coalescing operator is not an option as far as I can see because of the inline conversion that needs to happen on the .Text string if it's not null.

As far as I know the only way to do this is to use an if statement and/or assign it in two steps. In this particular case I find that very frustrating because I wanted to use the object initializer syntax and this assignment would be in the initialization block...

Anyone know a more elegant solution?

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1  
Check Eric Lippert's related blog entry: Type inference woes, part one –  CodesInChaos Apr 21 '12 at 17:44
    
Compiler Error CS0173 brought me here. –  DavidRR May 23 at 13:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 33 down vote accepted

The problem occurs because the conditional operator doesn't look at how the value is used (assigned in this case) to determine the type of the expression -- just the true/false values. In this case, you have a null and an Int32, and the type can not be determined (there are real reasons it can't just assume Nullable<Int32>).

If you really want to use it in this way, you must cast one of the values to Nullable<Int32> yourself, so C# can resolve the type:

EmployeeNumber =
    string.IsNullOrEmpty(employeeNumberTextBox.Text)
    ? (int?)null
    : Convert.ToInt32(employeeNumberTextBox.Text),

or

EmployeeNumber =
    string.IsNullOrEmpty(employeeNumberTextBox.Text)
    ? null
    : (int?)Convert.ToInt32(employeeNumberTextBox.Text),
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1  
You can also write new int?(). –  SLaks Apr 9 '10 at 16:02
3  
You say there are real reasons it can't assume Nullable<Int32>. What reasons? –  BlueMonkMN Aug 9 '10 at 16:46

I think a utility method could help make this cleaner.

public static class Convert
{
    public static T? To<T>(string value, Converter<string, T> converter) where T: struct
    {
        return string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) ? null : (T?)converter(value);
    }
}

then

EmployeeNumber = Convert.To<int>(employeeNumberTextBox.Text, Int32.Parse);
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That's a really good idea, and an example of where generic and extension methods are extremely awesome :) –  Grank Sep 16 '08 at 19:25

While Alex provides the correct and proximal answer to your question, I prefer to use TryParse:

int value;
int? EmployeeNumber = int.TryParse(employeeNumberTextBox.Text, out value)
    ? (int?)value
    : null;

It's safer and takes care of cases of invalid input as well as your empty string scenario. Otherwise if the user inputs something like "1b" they will be presented with an error page with the unhandled exception caused in Convert.ToInt32(string).

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I prefer to validate the user's input using the ASP.NET CompareValidator, which can be set to an Operator of DataTypeCheck and a Type of int. This ensures that the input will never be anything other than an integer, and does it client-side if it can. –  Grank Sep 16 '08 at 20:05

You can cast the output of Convert:

EmployeeNumber = string.IsNullOrEmpty(employeeNumberTextBox.Text)
   ? null
   : (int?)Convert.ToInt32(employeeNumberTextBox.Text)
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