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This program is supposed to prompt for the number of letters in a word(to be entered later) so it knows how much space to allocate. It seems to work OK, however it doesn't seem to matter if you allocate less memory than needed for the word to be stored. Is it a bug that I must correct or is it because that's how pointer to char (char *) works?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main() 
{
unsigned int a = 0;
printf("Enter the size of the word(0=exit) :");
scanf("%d",&a);
if(a==0){return 0;}
else
     {
      char *word = (char *)malloc(a*sizeof(char) + 1);
      if(word == NULL)
          {
           fprintf(stderr,"no memory allocated");
           return 1;
          }
      printf("Reserved %d bytes of space (accounting for the end-character).\nEnter your word: ", a*sizeof(char) + 1);
      scanf("%s", word);
      printf("The word is: %s\n", word);
     }

return 0;
}

All right i think i might have fixed it, this way, running with valgrind shows none of the errors that it showed earlier.

char aux[]="";
  scanf("%s", aux);

  if(strlen(aux)>(a*sizeof(char) + 1))
     {
  fprintf(stderr,"Word bigger than memory allocated\nExiting program\n");
  return 1;
     }
  else
     {
      strcpy(word,aux);
      printf("The word is: %s\nAnd is %d characters long\n", word, strlen(word));
     }

Now my doubt is: why can I declare an empty char array(char aux[] = ""), and then use "extra" memory with no errors (in valgrind output) yet char *aux = ""; gives me a segmentation fault? I'm very new to C programming so I'm sorry if it's obvious/ dumb question. Thanks.

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2  
scanf("%s", word) is inherently unsafe. If the user enters more characters than you allocated space for, however many that is, you have a buffer overflow. –  Keith Thompson Sep 27 '11 at 20:29
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, you must correct that bug in your program.

When you allocate less memory than you need, and later access that "extra" memory, the program goes into undefined behavior mode. It may seem to work, or it may crash, or it may do anything unexpected. Basically, nothing is guaranteed after you write to the extra memory that you didn't allocate.

[Update:]

My proposal to read a string of arbitrary length from a file is the following code. I cannot help that it is somewhat long, but since standard C doesn't provide a nice string data type, I had to do the whole memory management thing on my own. So here it is:

#include <assert.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

/** Reads a string from a file and dynamically allocates memory for it. */
int fagetln(FILE *f, /*@out*/ char **s, /*@out*/ size_t *ssize)
{
  char *buf;
  size_t bufsize, index;
  int c;

  bufsize = 128;
  if ((buf = malloc(bufsize)) == NULL) {
    return -1;
  }

  index = 0;
  while ((c = fgetc(f)) != EOF && c != '\n') {
    if (!(index + 1 < bufsize)) {
      bufsize *= 2;
      char *newbuf = realloc(buf, bufsize);
      if (newbuf == NULL) {
        free(buf);
        return -1;
      }
      buf = newbuf;
    }
    assert(index < bufsize);
    buf[index++] = c;
  }

  *s = buf;
  *ssize = index;
  assert(index < bufsize);
  buf[index++] = '\0';
  return ferror(f) ? -1 : 0;
}

int main(void)
{
  char *s;
  size_t slen;

  if (fagetln(stdin, &s, &slen) != -1) {
    printf("%zu bytes: %s\n", slen, s);
  }
  return 0;
}
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Not only that. The behavior is undefined to you, but it might be known to a hacker. In some situations, they can type a "word" that can allow them to control your program and do things you didn't intend. –  morningstar Sep 27 '11 at 19:55
    
Thank you for the quick answer, but how can i do this without betraying the purpose of allocating that memory? I don't want to use scanf to store another variable, check its size and then pass that to the adress of the pointer returned by malloc. –  JIM Sep 27 '11 at 20:07
    
I updated my answer with some example code. Another alternative I thought of would be to pass the maximum string length to fscanf (like in fscanf("%80s", word)), but then you would have to assemble the format string yourself, and that is even uglier than writing an easy-to-use function with a nice interface. –  Roland Illig Sep 27 '11 at 21:48
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It doesn't seem to matter but it does, if you use more space than allocated you will eventually end with a buffer overrun. It's possible that your current implementation allocates a bit more than what you actually request, its also possible that it doesn't. You cannot relay on that behavior, never access/use memory that wasn't allocated.

Also sizeof( char ) == 1 by definition.

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I know char is only 1 byte, I'm just used to doing that for cross architecture purposes for any type. –  JIM Sep 27 '11 at 20:04
    
@JIM: In every platform the sizeof(char) returns 1, is dictated by the standard. –  K-ballo Sep 27 '11 at 20:21
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Usually (but not always) the overflows of allocated buffers causing a crash when you free the buffer. If you would add free(word) at the end, you will probably see the crash.

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