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I'm building a quick csv from a mysql table with a query like:

select DATE(date),count(date) from table group by DATE(date) order by date asc;

and just dumping them to a file in perl over a:

while(my($date,$sum) = $sth->fetchrow) {
    print CSV "$date,$sum\n"
}

There are date gaps in the data, though:

| 2008-08-05 |           4 | 
| 2008-08-07 |          23 |

I would like to pad the data to fill in the missing days with zero-count entries to end up with:

| 2008-08-05 |           4 | 
| 2008-08-06 |           0 | 
| 2008-08-07 |          23 |

I slapped together a really awkward (and almost certainly buggy) workaround with an array of days-per-month and some math, but there has to be something more straightforward either on the mysql or perl side.

Any genius ideas/slaps in the face for why me am being so dumb?


I ended up going with a stored procedure which generated a temp table for the date range in question for a couple of reasons:

  • I know the date range I'll be looking for every time
  • The server in question unfortunately was not one that I can install perl modules on atm, and the state of it was decrepit enough that it didn't have anything remotely Date::-y installed

The perl Date/DateTime-iterating answers were also very good, I wish I could select multiple answers!

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11 Answers 11

up vote 15 down vote accepted

When you need something like that on server side, you usually create a table which contains all possible dates between two points in time, and then left join this table with query results. Something like this:

create procedure sp1(d1 date, d2 date)
  declare d datetime;

  create temporary table foo (d date not null);

  set d = d1
  while d <= d2 do
    insert into foo (d) values (d)
    set d = date_add(d, interval 1 day)
  end while

  select foo.d, count(date)
  from foo left join table on foo.d = table.date
  group by foo.d order by foo.d asc;

  drop temporary table foo;
end procedure

In this particular case it would be better to put a little check on the client side, if current date is not previos+1, put some addition strings.

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not dumb, this isn't something that MySQL does, inserting the empty date values. I do this in perl with a two-step process. First, load all of the data from the query into a hash organised by date. Then, I create a Date::EzDate object and increment it by day, so...

my $current_date = Date::EzDate->new();
$current_date->{'default'} = '{YEAR}-{MONTH NUMBER BASE 1}-{DAY OF MONTH}';
while ($current_date <= $final_date)
{
    print "$current_date\t|\t%hash_o_data{$current_date}";  # EzDate provides for     automatic stringification in the format specfied in 'default'
    $current_date++;
}

where final date is another EzDate object or a string containing the end of your date range.

EzDate isn't on CPAN right now, but you can probably find another perl mod that will do date compares and provide a date incrementor.

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When I had to deal with this problem, to fill in missing dates I actually created a reference table that just contained all dates I'm interested in and joined the data table on the date field. It's crude, but it works.

SELECT DATE(r.date),count(d.date) 
FROM dates AS r 
LEFT JOIN table AS d ON d.date = r.date 
GROUP BY DATE(r.date) 
ORDER BY r.date ASC;

As for output, I'd just use SELECT INTO OUTFILE instead of generating the CSV by hand. Leaves us free from worrying about escaping special characters as well.

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You could use a DateTime object:

use DateTime;
my $dt;

while ( my ($date, $sum) = $sth->fetchrow )  {
    if (defined $dt) {
        print CSV $dt->ymd . ",0\n" while $dt->add(days => 1)->ymd lt $date;
    }
    else {
        my ($y, $m, $d) = split /-/, $date;
        $dt = DateTime->new(year => $y, month => $m, day => $d);
    }
    print CSV, "$date,$sum\n";
}

What the above code does is it keeps the last printed date stored in a DateTime object $dt, and when the current date is more than one day in the future, it increments $dt by one day (and prints it a line to CSV) until it is the same as the current date.

This way you don't need extra tables, and don't need to fetch all your rows in advance.

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The MySQL approach would be to outer-join it with a list of all possible dates. I'm not sure if there is an easy way to generate that on the fly, otherwise you'd need a new table to hold those dates.

In Perl, you could check if the date you got is one day after the last one you got and if not, insert it with a value of zero.

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1  
That was basically my workaround, but it's extremely hacky, as there can be multiple day gaps and you have to deal with month rollovers and possible gaps at the end of the month, etc. I know my date range (last three months) so if I can generate the possible dates in sql that would be perfect –  user13196 Sep 16 '08 at 19:17
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Since you don't know where the gaps are, and yet you want all the values (presumably) from the first date in your list to the last one, do something like:

use DateTime;
use DateTime::Format::Strptime;
my @row = $sth->fetchrow;
my $countdate = strptime("%Y-%m-%d", $firstrow[0]);
my $thisdate = strptime("%Y-%m-%d", $firstrow[0]);

while ($countdate) {
  # keep looping countdate until it hits the next db row date
  if(DateTime->compare($countdate, $thisdate) == -1) {
    # counter not reached next date yet
    print CSV $countdate->ymd . ",0\n";
    $countdate = $countdate->add( days => 1 );
    $next;
  }

  # countdate is equal to next row's date, so print that instead
  print CSV $thisdate->ymd . ",$row[1]\n";

  # increase both
  @row = $sth->fetchrow;
  $thisdate = strptime("%Y-%m-%d", $firstrow[0]);
  $countdate = $countdate->add( days => 1 );
}

Hmm, that turned out to be more complicated than I thought it would be.. I hope it makes sense!

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I don't know if this would work, but how about if you created a new table which contained all the possible dates (that might be the problem with this idea, if the range of dates is going to change unpredictably...) and then do a left join on the two tables? I guess it's a crazy solution if there are a vast number of possible dates, or no way to predict the first and last date, but if the range of dates is either fixed or easy to work out, then this might work.

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Use some Perl module to do date calculations, like recommended DateTime or Time::Piece (core from 5.10). Just increment date and print date and 0 until date will match current.

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I think the simplest general solution to the problem would be to create an Ordinal table with the highest number of rows that you need (in your case 31*3 = 93).

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `Ordinal` (
  `n` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, PRIMARY KEY (`n`)
);
INSERT INTO `Ordinal` (`n`)
VALUES (NULL), (NULL), (NULL); #etc

Next, do a LEFT JOIN from Ordinal onto your data. Here's a simple case, getting every day in the last week:

SELECT CURDATE() - INTERVAL `n` DAY AS `day`
FROM `Ordinal` WHERE `n` <= 7
ORDER BY `n` ASC

The two things you would need to change about this are the starting point and the interval. I have used SET @var = 'value' syntax for clarity.

SET @end = CURDATE() - INTERVAL DAY(CURDATE()) DAY;
SET @begin = @end - INTERVAL 3 MONTH;
SET @period = DATEDIFF(@end, @begin);

SELECT @begin + INTERVAL (`n` + 1) DAY AS `date`
FROM `Ordinal` WHERE `n` < @period
ORDER BY `n` ASC;

So the final code would look something like this, if you were joining to get the number of messages per day over the last three months:

SELECT COUNT(`msg`.`id`) AS `message_count`, `ord`.`date` FROM (
    SELECT ((CURDATE() - INTERVAL DAY(CURDATE()) DAY) - INTERVAL 3 MONTH) + INTERVAL (`n` + 1) DAY AS `date`
    FROM `Ordinal`
    WHERE `n` < (DATEDIFF((CURDATE() - INTERVAL DAY(CURDATE()) DAY), ((CURDATE() - INTERVAL DAY(CURDATE()) DAY) - INTERVAL 3 MONTH)))
    ORDER BY `n` ASC
) AS `ord`
LEFT JOIN `Message` AS `msg`
  ON `ord`.`date` = `msg`.`date`
GROUP BY `ord`.`date`

Tips and Comments:

  • Probably the hardest part of your query was determining the number of days to use when limiting Ordinal. By comparison, transforming that integer sequence into dates was easy.
  • You can use Ordinal for all of your uninterrupted-sequence needs. Just make sure it contains more rows than your longest sequence.
  • You can use multiple queries on Ordinal for multiple sequences, for example listing every weekday (1-5) for the past seven (1-7) weeks.
  • You could make it faster by storing dates in your Ordinal table, but it would be less flexible. This way you only need one Ordinal table, no matter how many times you use it. Still, if the speed is worth it, try the INSERT INTO ... SELECT syntax.
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I hope you will figure out the rest.

select  * from (
select date_add('2003-01-01 00:00:00.000', INTERVAL n5.num*10000+n4.num*1000+n3.num*100+n2.num*10+n1.num DAY ) as date from
(select 0 as num
   union all select 1
   union all select 2
   union all select 3
   union all select 4
   union all select 5
   union all select 6
   union all select 7
   union all select 8
   union all select 9) n1,
(select 0 as num
   union all select 1
   union all select 2
   union all select 3
   union all select 4
   union all select 5
   union all select 6
   union all select 7
   union all select 8
   union all select 9) n2,
(select 0 as num
   union all select 1
   union all select 2
   union all select 3
   union all select 4
   union all select 5
   union all select 6
   union all select 7
   union all select 8
   union all select 9) n3,
(select 0 as num
   union all select 1
   union all select 2
   union all select 3
   union all select 4
   union all select 5
   union all select 6
   union all select 7
   union all select 8
   union all select 9) n4,
(select 0 as num
   union all select 1
   union all select 2
   union all select 3
   union all select 4
   union all select 5
   union all select 6
   union all select 7
   union all select 8
   union all select 9) n5
) a
where date >'2011-01-02 00:00:00.000' and date < NOW()
order by date

With

select n3.num*100+n2.num*10+n1.num as date

you will get a column with numbers from 0 to max(n3)*100+max(n2)*10+max(n1)

Since here we have max n3 as 3, SELECT will return 399, plus 0 -> 400 records (dates in calendar).

You can tune your dynamic calendar by limiting it, for example, from min(date) you have to now().

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I upvoted the store procedure one. but RUN FROM IT.

create a temporary table with the dates alright. but do not use the stored procs.

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-1 for not explaining why not –  John Saunders Jun 5 '11 at 1:51
    
ouch, this question is old... i didn't even knew how to use the comments here... anyway, good point. i deserved it since i can't remember now. I'm guessing it was because stored proc in mysql is such a pain that for this case the benefit was too small. also the proc would have app logic in it, and the app logic has to know about the proc limitation. just easier to leave all in application logic and avoid the mysql stored pro hell. –  gcb Jun 8 '11 at 21:54
    
Explain that in your answer, and I'll remove the downvote. –  John Saunders Jun 8 '11 at 22:39
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