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Imagine a condintion should be true for a method to do its stuff. Which block represents the best approach (performance related and readability), or if not what is your suggestion?!

private void method()
{
    if(!condition)
    {
     MessageBox.Show("ERROR!");
     return;
    }     
    else
    {
        //DO STUFF
    }
}

OR

private void method()
{
    if(condition)
    {
         //DO STUFF
    }     
    else
    {
         MessageBox.Show("ERROR!");
         return;
    }
}
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1  
This question is better suited here: codereview.stackexchange.com –  Kiley Naro Sep 27 '11 at 20:47
2  
Is there any particular reason you're not throwing an exception? Seems like this is inviting bugs such as "all hell breaking loose after clicking OK on the error message" –  harold Sep 27 '11 at 20:47
1  
@harold, code is at top layer (UI), so you cannot suggest to throw exception to user. –  hungryMind Sep 27 '11 at 20:51
1  
@hungryMind This code doesn't necessarily say it's at the top-level. This could very easily be at a lower level, and could be written to throw an exception that top level code catches and then shows the message box. That would actually probably even be better than the extra return. –  Visionary Software Solutions Sep 27 '11 at 21:01
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9 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, neither, as you wouldn't use both else and return.

So, you would either do:

private void method() {
  if (!condition) {
    MessageBox.Show("ERROR!");
  } else {
    //DO STUFF
  }
}

or:

private void method() {
  if (condition) {
    //DO STUFF
  } else {
    MessageBox.Show("ERROR!");
  }
}

or:

private void method() {
  if (!condition) {
    MessageBox.Show("ERROR!");
    return
  }
  //DO STUFF
}

or:

private void method() {
  if (condition) {
    //DO STUFF
    return;
  }
  MessageBox.Show("ERROR!");
}

Which you use depends mostly on what the code actually does. The code is seldom as simple as in the examples, so it matters what more the code will do.

The first two have the advantage of having a single exit point, which often makes it easier to follow the code. You would usually put the shorter code first, as it's easier to spot there than in an else after a larger code block.

The third is often used to validate input before continuing with the main code, and you can easily have more than one validation:

private void method() {
  if (!condition) {
    MessageBox.Show("ERROR!");
    return
  }
  if (!anotherCondition) {
    MessageBox.Show("ANOTHER ERROR!");
    return
  }
  //DO STUFF
}

The fourth is useful if you have several conditions that you don't want to put in the same if statement:

private void method() {
  if (condition) {
    var data = GetSomeData();
    if (data.IsValid) {
      var moreData = GetSomeMoreData();
      if (moreData.IsValid) {
        //DO STUFF
        return;
      }
    }
  }
  MessageBox.Show("ERROR!");
}
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Nicely enumerated and clearly explained! –  Michael Sorens Sep 28 '11 at 15:51
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Neither. Use a guard clause instead:

private void method()
{
    if(!condition)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("ERROR!");
        return;
    }     

    //inputs have been checked, proceed with normal execution
}

Done this way you can deal with all the exceptional behaviour up-front and avoiding excessive levels of indentation for the normal execution path.

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My answer is different than this, but yours is the pattern I actually use in most of my code. +1 to you for thinking of it. –  David Stratton Sep 27 '11 at 20:47
    
I prefer this way as well so I'm giving the +1. But it's worth noting that some people are sticklers for "each function should have a single return". Obviously that wasn't part of the OP's question, so again just something to take note of. –  Kiley Naro Sep 27 '11 at 20:48
    
@Kiley Single return was popular and valuable in the days before exceptions and when goto was common. It's time has passed. –  David Heffernan Sep 27 '11 at 20:49
    
@DavidHeffernan I'm glad to know that the way I've been doing things (it defied what I thought was "standard convention" because I thought "standard convention" was stupid) is the way most people do it. Thanks for the info! –  Kiley Naro Sep 27 '11 at 20:56
1  
@Kiley I'm not sure it's the way most people do it. I think a lot of people still follow the single return maxim. Modern thought seems to have moved away from that. However, having a method that returns left right and centre in the main part of execution is still bad form. Multiple exits in guard clauses is good practice in my book. –  David Heffernan Sep 27 '11 at 21:00
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Second! Second!

But I do admit to doing the first sometimes if the "//DO STUFF" is really long and nested.

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Ideally doStuff() should be another method call, if we follow Uncle Bob Martin's Clean Code guidelines on functions –  Visionary Software Solutions Sep 27 '11 at 20:46
1  
True, but only it if really makes sense as a unit of work. @DavidHeffernan's solution is just as good, but in either case you can't really expect all "//DO STUFF"s to be broken out into a new method every time. –  mlathe Sep 27 '11 at 21:02
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I prefer an "If condition" approach as opposed to the negation of a condition, but that's just personal preference.

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It depends.

In most cases, the second version.

if the amount of code in the (!condition) block is only a few lines of code, and the code in the (condition) block is a LOT of code, then I'd reverse the answer. it's easier to read through the if statement if you can see the "else" without having to scroll.

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If the code in the condition block is a lot of code, it should probably be refactored and extracted to another function. –  Visionary Software Solutions Sep 27 '11 at 20:49
    
I agreee, where applicable. I prefer small functions that do one thing and to it well. But there are those cases where it's not applicable and in that case, I'd still fall back on my answer. –  David Stratton Sep 27 '11 at 20:52
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I prefer a guard clause as David mentions, but in the general case you should put the most common case first. It makes it easier to follow the flow of a method.

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Readability/standards wise. I would accept number 2. I don't think there is a difference performance wise, but I'm not a low-level guy.

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As usually this is a question which asks for the following answer: "it depends" and I'll show by two examples.
IF NOT CONDITION For the ASP .Net Web Forms validation I'm seeing very often this code

protected void btSubmit_OnClick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  Page.Valide();
  if (!Page.IsValid)
     return;
  var customer = new Customer();
  // init 20 properties of customer
 ....
  var bo = new CustomerBO();
  bo.Save(customer);
}

There is another one much more popular:

 protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            if (!Page.IsPostBack)
                    {
                    }
        }

IF CONDITION

public void UpdateCustomer(int customerId, string ...../*it might be a customer type also*/)
{
   using (var ctx= CreateContext())
 {
    var customer = ctx.Customers.FirstOrDefault(c=>c.CustomerId = customerId);
    if ( customer != null)
    {
           /*code update 20 properties */
    }
 }
}

I hope the code is clear :P

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This is more of a style question than a "logical" question. Both of these approaches work, and which one you will use generally depends on your style as a thinker/developer.

That said, once you start using either one of these styles, it generally pays to be consistent. Having large classes where some functions do it the first way and others the second way can lead to maintainability concerns later.

Robert Martin's Clean Code presents an interesting chapter on functions that suggests, whichever way you choose, the //DO STUFF part should be another function call

Functions Should Only Do One Thing

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