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I have the following code:

short myShort = 23948;
byte myByte = (byte)myShort;

Now I wasn't expecting myByte to contain the value 23948. I would have guessed that it would contain 255 (I believe the largest value for a byte).

However, it contains 140, and it made me wonder why; what is actually going on behind the scenes?

Please note that I am not looking for someone to solve the problem that 23948 cannot fit into a byte, I am merely wondering about the underlying implementation

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10 Answers 10

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Short is a 2-byte type and a byte is, well, a single byte. When you cast from two bytes to one you're forcing the system to make things fit and one of the original bytes (the most significant) gets dropped and data is lost. What is left from the value of 23948 (binary: 0101 1101 1000 1100) is 140 which in binary translates to 1000 1100. So you are going from:

0101 1101 1000 1100 (2 byte decimal value 23948)

to:

          1000 1100 (1 byte decimal value 140)

You can only do this with an explicit cast. If you tried assigning a short to a byte without a cast the compiler would throw an error because of the potential for loss of data:

Cannot implicitly convert type 'short' to 'byte'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)

If you cast from a byte to a short on the other hand you could do it implicitly since no data would be getting lost.

using System;
public class MyClass
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        short myShort = 23948;
        byte myByte = (byte)myShort; // ok
        myByte = myShort; // error: 

        Console.WriteLine("Short: " + myShort);
        Console.WriteLine("Byte:  " + myByte);

        myShort = myByte; // ok

        Console.WriteLine("Short: " + myShort);
    }
}

With arithmetic overflow and unchecked context:

using System;
public class MyClass {
    public static void Main() {
        unchecked {
            short myShort = 23948;
            byte myByte = (byte)myShort; // ok
            myByte = myShort; // still an error
            int x = 2147483647 * 2; // ok since unchecked
        }   
    }
}
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There's an important gap here... even with your complete-looking sample, it could behave differently. It depends on whether the context is checked or unchecked, which depends on the code, but also on a compiler setting (or the "Check for arithmetic overflow/underflow" checkbox in VS) –  Marc Gravell Sep 27 '11 at 21:16
    
Marc: I tested with checked/unchecked and the behavior seems different for casting and arithmetic overflow. In an unchecked context overflows are allowed but casting still has to be explicit. See my added snippet. (I'm running Snippet Compiler with .NET 3.5) So... un/checked context seems to have no effect on casting... –  Paul Sasik Sep 27 '11 at 21:40
    
unchecked is the default; now make it checked instead to see the difference –  Marc Gravell Sep 27 '11 at 22:04
    
I've tried both. The result for the cast part of the code myByte = myShort; // still an error are the same regardless of whether checked or unchedked is specified. The compiler error is always the same: Cannot implicitly convert type 'short' to 'byte'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?) –  Paul Sasik Sep 27 '11 at 22:14
    
the only line I'm talking about is the one from the OP's post: byte myByte = (byte)myShort; –  Marc Gravell Sep 27 '11 at 22:23

Basically it just takes the last 8 bits... but in general, when you find some behaviour which surprises you, the next step should be to consult the spec. From section 6.2.1, with the extra emphasis mine, for the situation which is relevant in this case.

For a conversion from an integral type to another integral type, the processing depends on the overflow checking context (§7.6.12) in which the conversion takes place:

  • In a checked context, the conversion succeeds if the value of the source operand is within the range of the destination type, but throws a System.OverflowException if the value of the source operand is outside the range of the destination type.
  • In an unchecked context, the conversion always succeeds, and proceeds as follows.
    • If the source type is larger than the destination type, then the source value is truncated by discarding its “extra” most significant bits. The result is then treated as a value of the destination type.
    • If the source type is smaller than the destination type, then the source value is either sign-extended or zero-extended so that it is the same size as the destination type. Sign-extension is used if the source type is signed; zero-extension is used if the source type is unsigned. The result is then treated as a value of the destination type.
    • If the source type is the same size as the destination type, then the source value is treated as a value of the destination type.
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It depends; in a checked context, you'll get a big fat exception; in an unchecked context (the default) you get to keep the data from the last byte, the same as if you did:

byte b = (byte)(value & 255);
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In your specific case, the behavior is pretty cut and dry when you look at the bits for the value:

short myShort = 0x5D8C; // 23948
byte myByte = (byte)myShort; // myShort & 0xFF

Console.WriteLine("0x{0:X}", myByte); // 0x8C or 140
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Not so "cut and dry" really; now run it in a checked context... –  Marc Gravell Sep 27 '11 at 21:16
    
Since an exception was not thrown I assumed it was in an unchecked context. –  user7116 Sep 27 '11 at 21:24

Only the last 8 bits are kept. 23948 in binary is 101110110001100b. The last 8 bits of that is 10001100b, which equals 140.

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When you cast an integer type to a "smaller" integer type, only the lesser weight bits are considered. Mathematically, it's as if you used the modulo operation. So you get the value 140 because 23948 modulo 256 is 140.

Casting a long to an int would use the same mechanism.

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The result is the same when you do:

byte myByte = (byte)(myShort & 0xFF);

Everything above the eight bit is simply thrown away. The lower eight bits of 23948 (0x5D8C) is 140 (0x8C).

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Uhm...because when you cast short (2 bytes) to byte (1 byte) it gets only the first byte, and, the first byte of 23948 represents 140.

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23948 % 256 = 140, most significant bytes was lost after conversion, so the output is 140

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It's like when you have a two digit number, "97", and convert it to a one digit number, you lose the 9 and only keep the "7"

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