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I need to call one constructor from the body of another one, how to do that?

Basically

class foo {
    public foo (int x, int y)
    {
    }

    public foo (string s)
    {
        // ... do something

        // call another constructor
        this (x, y); // doesn't work
        foo (x, y); // neither
    }
}
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How about a constructor like public foo (int x, int y , string s) –  Jon Raynor Sep 27 '11 at 21:18
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5 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You can't.

You'll have to find a way to chain the constructors, as in:

public foo (int x, int y) { }
public foo (string s) : this(XFromString(s), YFromString(s)) { ... }

or move your construction code into a common setup method, like this:

public foo (int x, int y) { Setup(x, y); }
public foo (string s)
{
   // do stuff
   int x = XFromString(s);
   int y = YFromString(s);
   Setup(x, y);
}

public void Setup(int x, int y) { ... }
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2  
Note that in general, a setup method would be unable to write to readonly variables, but a constructor can pass readonly variables as a ref parameters to a setup method which would then be able to write to its ref parameters even though they're read-only variables. –  supercat Oct 9 '12 at 14:27
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this(x, y) is right, but it has to be before the start of the constructor body:

public Foo(int x, int y)
{
    ...
}

public Foo(string s) : this(5, 10)
{
}

Note that:

  • You can only chain to one constructor, either this or base - that constructor can chain to another one, of course.
  • You can't chain to a constructor after executing any code in the constructor body.
  • You can't use this within the arguments to the other constructor, including calling instance methods - but you can call static methods.
  • Any instance variable initializers are executed before the chained call.

I have a bit more information in my article about constructor chaining.

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That's especially annoying when you have something like this: class A{ public A(IEnumerable<int> items) {...} public A(MyClass c) : this(c.Items) { ... } }. Any null check in the second ctor will only be executed after c is accessed. The second ctor will throw a NRE if c is null, instead of the preferred ArgumentNullException. If you want to keep your fields read only, there is no other possibility than to implement the same logic in two ctors. Or is there a better way to do this? –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 27 '11 at 21:31
    
@DanielHilgarth: Yes there is. Have a generic extension method which checks for nullity but returns the original value otherwise. Then you can do this(c.ThrowIfNull("c").Items) –  Jon Skeet Sep 27 '11 at 21:33
    
Thanks, that was the only thing I could come up with, too. Just wanted to edit my comment... Wasn't sure if it is a good way though, because I haven't seen it anywhere so far... –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 27 '11 at 21:35
    
@DanielHilgarth: I think it's okay, yeah. –  Jon Skeet Sep 27 '11 at 21:36
    
One question: Is the evaluation order of parameters fixed or an implementation detail that could change? Because if you need to access multiple properties, it get's quite unwieldy: public PcmSample(IPcmSample other) : this(other.ThrowIfNull("other").Channels, other.ThrowIfNull("other").Items) –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 27 '11 at 21:39
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To call both base and this class constructor explicitly you need to use syntax given below (note, that in C# you can not use it to initialize fields like in C++):

class foo
{
    public foo (int x, int y)
    {
    }

    public foo (string s) : this(5, 6)
    {
        // ... do something
    }
}

//EDIT: Noticed, that you've used x,y in your sample. Of course, values given when invoking ctor such way can't rely on parameters of other constructor, they must be resolved other way (they do not need to be constants though as in edited code sample above). If x and y is computed from s, you can do it this way:

public foo (string s) : this(GetX(s), GetY(s))
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2  
Little remark: public foo(string s) : this(x, y) will not work. public foo(string s, int x, int y) : this(x, y) will compile –  Łukasz Wiatrak Sep 27 '11 at 21:15
    
Of course, my bad. Fixed. Thank you for pointing that out –  Marcin Deptuła Sep 27 '11 at 21:19
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This is not supported - see http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/constructors.html .

What you can do however is implement a common (private) method which you call from the different constructors...

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I've ran into this problem a time or two myself... what I ended up having to do was extract whatever logic I needed in that other constructor into a private void method and calling it in both places.

class foo
{
  private void Initialize(int x, int y)
  {
    //... do stuff
  }

  public foo(int x, int y)
  {
    Initialize(x, y);
  }

  public foo(string s_
  {
    // ... do stuff

    Initialize(x, y)
    // ... more stuff
  }
}
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