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Ok so let's say I have two classes, class A and class B. They both need to perform a common operation but it wouldn't make sense to have them both derive from the same object so instead we go with composition. Basically, "has a" makes sense where "is a" doesn't.

Now each of the two classes instantiate this object and use it to perform the common operation and all is good. Everything is fine, now.

The problem arises when each of these two classes have to expose an event that the common routine must raise. Uh oh. Now what?

Well, we could do something like this in each of the two classes:

public event EventHandler CommonEvent
{
    add { theCommonObject.CommonEvent += value; }
    remove { theCommonObject.CommonEvent -= value; }
}

But now this code needs to be duplicated in each of the two classes and readers of the code may be somewhat confused by this code as well. add and remove are not very commonly seen keywords, at least.

Still, there is duplicate code in both of the two classes and not only that, but this solution will not always work!

For example, what if theCommonObject is locally instantiated in a single method and its scope is only within that one method.

Well then, in that case we cannot even use the shortcut code posted earlier and we have to completely duplicate the code in both classes. Not only that but it just screams inelegance because we're basically just re-raising a copy of the event to clients.

Example code that would have to be duplicated in each class in this case:

public event EventHandler SomeCommonEvent;

private void SomeMethod()
{
    theCommonObject = new theCommonObject();

    theCommonObject.DoSomething();

    theCommonObject.SomeCommonEvent += thisClass_SomeCommonEvent;
}

private void thisClass_SomeCommonEvent(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var handler = SomeCommonEvent;

    if (handler != null)
    {
        handler(this, e);
    }
}

As you can see, in both cases there is duplicate code but in the second there is even more because the object is local to a method rather than a member variable.

I cannot really think of a way around this, other than using inheritance but I don't think it makes semantic sense to do so, and many often claim that composition is superior to inheritance in terms of complexity-reduction, ease-of-understanding, et cetera.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You say you have a "has-a" relationship. From that, and based on your proposed solution that duplicates code, I assume your class A looks something like:

public class A
{
    private SomeCommonObject theCommonObject;
    public event EventHandler CommonEvent
    {
        add { theCommonObject.CommonEvent += value; }
        remove { theCommonObject.CommonEvent -= value; }
    }

    public A()
    {
        theCommonObject = new SomeCommonObject();
    }
}

Where's the problem? theCommonObject can never be "locally instantiated in a single method and its scope is only within that one method."

Yes, add and remove are not commonly used. So what? Clients of the class never see the add and remove. They still subscribe to the event using the traditional += syntax. The add and remove syntax is a non-issue as far as clients are concerned. And you, the developer, who is creating the class, are expected to know about these things.

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Thank you for the reply. This is a good idea but SomeCommonObject has to go out of scope and be de-allocated after the method finishes in my instance. Also, there is still the original problem where this code still needs to be duplicated in each of the classes. –  Ryan Peschel Sep 27 '11 at 22:04
    
If SomeCommonObject goes out of scope, then the only "problem" is that there won't be any more notifications coming from it. I don't see that as a problem. Just don't store it in the object. As for duplicating those few lines of code ... did you expect it to be free? –  Jim Mischel Sep 27 '11 at 22:08
    
Well, the entire purpose of this post was to find a way around this. Any sort of code repetition like this smells bad to me. I literally have to copy and paste the code from one class to another. No changes. –  Ryan Peschel Sep 27 '11 at 22:14
    
With the information you've given, that's the best I can propose. I get the feeling, though, that if you provided a little more information (for example, the circumstances in which SomeCommonObject has limited local scope), we could come up with an alternative that would be more palatable. –  Jim Mischel Sep 27 '11 at 22:31

You could use static helper to get code one time but it's also 'bad'

Problem is implementation can be written one time with derived, you decided not to derive.

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