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I have the following script:

#!/bin/sh    
Q=`</dev/urandom tr -dc A-Za-z0-9 | head -c30`
mysql -uusername -ppasword accounts -e "update forum set key='$Q' where id='1';"

I have to add back-ticks (``) to "forum", "key" and "id", otherwise it returns me an error:

ERROR 1064 (42000) at line 1: You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'key='xdindSG7hK9KaYgs9RISJNqrzmn4LJ' where id='1'' at line 1

But if I add the back-ticks, bash interprets them as variables.

What should I do?

Regards

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Switch the single and double quotes. Single quotes instructs bash to ignore the contents and you will be able to add your back-ticks.

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Yes, but if I do that, variable $Q won't work. –  David Adders Sep 27 '11 at 22:37
    
Sorry, missed that. Then just escape the backticks by preceeding them with a backslash. –  KQ. Sep 27 '11 at 22:44
    
Thanks! that worked out. –  David Adders Sep 27 '11 at 23:06

Try a HERE document:

#!/bin/sh    
Q=`</dev/urandom tr -dc A-Za-z0-9 | head -c30`
mysql -uusername -ppasword accounts <<HERE
    update forum set key='$Q' where id='1';
HERE

Try with

cat <<HERE
    update forum set key='$Q' where id='1';
HERE

Output:

update forum set key='fnPIOid15anEJ2a3zVL6I1wbRjAKk0' where id='1';

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