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This buffer should contain slots (three in this example) of equal length ( 20 in this example)
The buffer has to have contiguous memory so that it can be passed to a C function in non-const fashion.

const int slot_size = 20;
std::vector<char> vbuffer;

This function takes a string, copies to a temporary buffer of the required size then appeds it to vbuffer

void prepBuffer( const std::string& s)
{
  std::vector<char> temp(slot_size);
  std::copy(s.c_str(), s.c_str() + s.length() + 1, temp.begin());
  vbuffer.insert(vbuffer.end(), temp.begin(), temp.end());
}

Testing the function

int main()
{
  vbuffer.reserve(60);
  prepBuffer( "Argentina");
  prepBuffer( "Herzegovina");
  prepBuffer( "Zambia");

  cout << &vbuffer[0] << endl;
  cout << &vbuffer[20] << endl;
  cout << &vbuffer[40] << endl;
}

Question. There is a lot of string copying in my prepBuffer function. I am looking for a better way to fill up vbuffer with minimal copying
EDIT
The size of slots is determined elsewhere in the program. But it is not known at compile time.

EDIT

In line with my accepted answer below, I have settled on this version

void prepBuffer(const std::string& s)
{
  assert(s.size() < slot_size );
  vbuffer.insert(vbuffer.end(), s.begin(), s.end());
  vbuffer.insert(vbuffer.end(), slot_size - s.size(), '\0' ); 
}


Suggestions are still welcome

share|improve this question
    
Do you need the different strings stored end to end? Your code would be a lot simpler if you used std::vector<std::string> instead. –  Praetorian Sep 27 '11 at 22:56
    
@Praetorian I had anticipated such a suggestion but forgot to clarify. Just edited my question. Yes the buffer has to have contiguous memory –  user841550 Sep 27 '11 at 22:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How about this:

vbuffer.reserve(vbuffer.size() + 20);
vbuffer.insert(vbuffer.end(), s.begin(), s.end());
vbuffer.insert(vbuffer.end(), 20 - s.size(), '\0');

An additional check on the string length is recommended, along with a policy for handling over-long strings (e.g. assert(s.size() < 20);).

share|improve this answer
    
This looks elegant. Any idea how performant this would be compared to James McNellis non-template version. –  user841550 Sep 27 '11 at 23:43
    
I doubt it'd be much worse, and it skips the redundant zero-initializations. Profile and see for yourself, I'd say (and consider readability and maintainability perhaps). If you can hoist the reserve() out of the function, all the better. –  Kerrek SB Sep 27 '11 at 23:51
    
I think this is going to result in lots of re-allocations. Potentially too many calls to reserve. Possibly as bad as my version –  user841550 Sep 28 '11 at 0:10
    
Well, if you can predetermine the allocation needs, you can just do a single reserve(); or even better, get rid of it entirely and rely on the vector's amortized O(1) insertion. reserve() has to be used with care... –  Kerrek SB Sep 28 '11 at 0:18
1  
'\0' -- the integer value of the character whose integer value is 0 ;-) –  Steve Jessop Sep 28 '11 at 1:13

If you don't use std::string at all and avoid the temporary std::vector, you can easily do this without any extra dynamic allocation.

template <unsigned N>
void prepBuffer(char const (&s)[N])
{
    std::copy(s, s + N, std::back_inserter(vbuffer));
    vbuffer.resize(vbuffer.size() - N + 20);
}

Or, since the number of characters to be written is known ahead of time, you could just as easily use a nontemplate function:

void prepBuffer(char const* s)
{
    unsigned n = vbuffer.size();
    vbuffer.resize(n + 20);
    while (*s && n != vbuffer.size())
    {
        vbuffer[n] = *s;
        ++n;
        ++s;
    }

    assert(*s == 0 && n != vbuffer.size());
    // Alternatively, throw an exception or handle the error some other way
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please can you illustrate usage? –  user841550 Sep 27 '11 at 23:02
    
The usage is no different from your program's usage. –  James McNellis Sep 27 '11 at 23:03
    
I would +1 this, but is not optimal as requested. No guarantees that vector reallocation -if needed- will be performed only once. –  K-ballo Sep 27 '11 at 23:05
1  
You better guarantee somehow that this gets inlined, or you'll have plenty of code bloat: one function for every string length! –  Kerrek SB Sep 27 '11 at 23:05
2  
@Kerrek: Code bloat is meaningless. The function is tiny anyway and extra binary size is usually irrelevant. –  Puppy Sep 27 '11 at 23:19

Another idea:

std::vector<std::array<char, 20> > prepped(3);

strncpy(prepped[0].begin(), "Argentina",   20);
strncpy(prepped[1].begin(), "Herzegovina", 20);
strncpy(prepped[2].begin(), "Zambia",      20);

You could write

typedef std::vector<std::array<char, 20> > prepped_t;
strncpy(..., ..., sizeof(prepped_t::value_type));

in case you wanted to be a bit more flexible when changing the size of the nested array

share|improve this answer
    
A nested array would certainly work and I used it at one time. But it is inflexible. Even though the sizes of slots are known, they are not known at compile time. –  user841550 Sep 27 '11 at 23:51
void prepBuffer( const char *s, std::size_t offset)
{
  strncpy(&vbuffer[offset], s, 20);
}

Testing the function

int main()
{
  vbuffer.resize(60);
  prepBuffer( "Argentina", 0);
  prepBuffer( "Herzegovina", 20);
  prepBuffer( "Zambia", 40);

  cout << &vbuffer[0] << endl;
  cout << &vbuffer[20] << endl;
  cout << &vbuffer[40] << endl;
}

That minimizes copying, at the cost of maintainability.


Here is nearly-optimal code that is still readable and maintainable.

std::string vbuffer;
void prepBuffer( const std::string& s)
{
  vbuffer += s;
  vbuffer.resize( ( (vbuffer.size() +19) / 20) * 20));
}

Testing the function

int main()
{
  vbuffer.reserve(60);
  prepBuffer( "Argentina");
  prepBuffer( "Herzegovina");
  prepBuffer( "Zambia");

  cout << &vbuffer[0] << endl;
  cout << &vbuffer[20] << endl;
  cout << &vbuffer[40] << endl;
}
share|improve this answer

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