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When adding caching to a model in Rails, there is the repetitive nature that looks like the following:

class Team < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :name
end

Before caching, to retrieve a name, everything was trivial,

team = Team.new(:name => "The Awesome Team")
team.save

team.name # "The Awesome Team"

With caching introduced using memcached or redis I find myself adding methods to my models and it's super repetitive:

def get_name
  if name_is_in_cache
    return cached_name
  else
    name
  end
end

def set_name(name)
  # set name in cache
  self.name = name
end

Is there some obvious way that I'm missing to clean this up? I'm caching a lot of fields in different ways and it seems attr_accessible is virtually redundant at this point. How can this be cleaned up?

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Can you add some examples of the complex/performance intensive methods that are forcing you to use caching? –  James Sep 27 '11 at 23:42
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Create a mixin that just provides wrappers around instance_eval. Untested:

module AttributeCaching
  def cache(name)
    instance_eval(<<-RUBY)
      def get_#{name}
        if #{name}_is_in_cache
          return cached_#{name}
        else
          #{name}
        end
      end
    RUBY

    instance_eval(<<-RUBY)
      def set_#{name}(name) 
        self.#{name} = name
      end
    RUBY
  end
end

Then in your model:

class Team < ActiveRecord::Base
  extend AttributeCaching

  cache :name
  cache :something_else
end

You could probably make your life a lot easier, however, by not naming each of your caching methods differently. Couldn't you do something like get_cached(name) and set_cached(name, value), then your problem suddenly becomes a lot less repetitive.

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I should have been more specific in my original question. This does answer the question. With tools like Redis, however, there are different data types and different ways to add/remove from those types. In that case, your abstraction above would fail. With that said, you did answer the question in the way it was originally asked and I thank you for that. –  randombits Sep 28 '11 at 3:04
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