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What is the difference between the Builder design pattern and the Factory design pattern? Which is more advantageous and why?

I want to test and compare/contrast these patterns. How do I represent my findings as a graph?

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Since they do different things, what do you mean by "advantageous"? –  S.Lott Apr 16 '09 at 19:44
    
@ykaratoprak: Can you please mark the answer to your question? –  KMån Apr 5 '10 at 5:35
    
Which is better, a phone or a piece of lumber? Well, if I'm trying to communicate with someone at a distance, the phone. If I'm trying to build a table, the lumber. –  allyourcode Mar 16 at 3:05
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14 Answers

up vote 91 down vote accepted

With design patterns, there usually is no "more advantageous" solution that works for all cases. It depends on what you need to implement.

From Wikipedia:

  • Builder focuses on constructing a complex object step by step. Abstract Factory emphasizes a family of product objects (either simple or complex). Builder returns the product as a final step, but as far as the Abstract Factory is concerned, the product gets returned immediately.
  • Builder often builds a Composite.
  • Often, designs start out using Factory Method (less complicated, more customizable, subclasses proliferate) and evolve toward Abstract Factory, Prototype, or Builder (more flexible, more complex) as the designer discovers where more flexibility is needed.
  • Sometimes creational patterns are complementary: Builder can use one of the other patterns to implement which components get built. Abstract Factory, Builder, and Prototype can use Singleton in their implementations.

Wikipedia entry for factory design pattern: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factory_method_pattern

Wikipedia entry for builder design pattern: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Builder_pattern

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18  
This is exactly the difference. The Builder is only needed when an object cannot be produced in one step. One great an example of this would be in the de-serialization process for a complex object. Often times the parameters for the complex object must be retrieved one by one. –  Bernard Mar 24 '11 at 16:17
    
For the first sentence, I would say there absolutely is often a more advantageous solution that applies broadly... we just don't see these, because they end up baked directly into programming languages. –  Joel Coehoorn Jul 19 '13 at 21:32
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@Joel: I agree that some patterns are more common that others (for instance, Factory seems to be more common than Builder), but what I meant is that none of them is always better than the other, no matter what the scenario looks like. –  Adrian Grigore Jul 22 '13 at 20:04
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The Factory pattern can almost be seen as a simplified version of the Builder pattern.

In the Factory pattern, the factory is in charge of creating various subtypes of an object depending on the needs.

The user of a factory method doesn't need to know the exact subtype of that object. An example of a factory method createCar might return a Ford or a Honda typed object.

In the Builder pattern, different subtypes are also created by a builder method, but the composition of the objects might differ within the same subclass.

To continue the car example you might have a createCar builder method which creates a Honda-typed object with a 4 cylinder engine, or a Honda-typed object with 6 cylinders. The builder pattern allows for this finer granularity.

Diagrams of both the Builder pattern and the Factory method pattern on available on Wikipedia.

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A factory is simply a wrapper function around a constructor (possibly one in a different class). The key difference is that a factory method pattern requires the entire object to be built in a single method call, with all the parameters pass in on a single line. The final object will be returned.

A builder pattern, on the other hand, is in essence a wrapper object around all the possible parameters you might want to pass into a constructor invocation. This allows you to use setter methods to slowly build up your parameter list. One additional method on a builder class is a build() method, which simply passes the builder object into the desired constructor, and returns the result.

In static languages like Java, this becomes more important when you have more than a handful of (potentially optional) parameters, as it avoids the requirement to have telescopic constructors for all the possible combinations of parameters. Also a builder allows you to use setter methods to define read-only or private fields that cannot be directly modified after the constructor has been called.

Basic Factory Example

// Factory
static class FruitFactory {
    static Fruit create(name, color, firmness) {
        // Additional logic
        return new Fruit(name, color, firmness);
    }
}

// Usage
Fruit fruit = FruitFactory.create("apple", "red", "crunchy");

Basic Builder Example

// Builder
class FruitBuilder {
    String name, color, firmness;
    FruitBuilder setName(name)         { this.name     = name;     return this; }
    FruitBuilder setColor(color)       { this.color    = color;    return this; }
    FruitBuilder setFirmness(firmness) { this.firmness = firmness; return this; }
    Fruit build() {
        return new Fruit(this); // Pass in the builder
    }
}

// Usage
Fruit fruit = new FruitBuilder().setName("apple")
        .setColor("red")
        .setFirmness("crunchy")
        .build();

It may be worth comparing the code samples from these two wikipedia pages:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factory_method_pattern
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Builder_pattern

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The builder design pattern describes an object that knows how to craft another object of a specific type over several steps. It holds the needed state for the target item at each intermediate step. Think what StringBuilder goes through to produce a final string.

The factory design pattern describes an object that knows how to create several different but related kinds of object in one step, where the specific type is chosen based on given parameters. Think of the serialization system, where you create your serializer and it constructs the desired in object all in one load call.

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Just some hint: good example for builder pattern is "fluent interface" and ADO.NET is full with "factory" and "abstract factory" implementations (ie. DbFactory). –  boj Apr 16 '09 at 19:49
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  • Constructing a complex object step by step : builder pattern

  • A simple object is created by using a single method : factory method pattern

  • Creating Object by using multiple factory method : Abstract factory pattern

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simple and neat! –  deeshank Jun 22 '13 at 8:52
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Both are Creational patterns, to create Object.

1) Factory Pattern - Assume, you have one super class and N number of sub classes. The object is created depends on which parameter/value is passed.

2) Builder pattern - to create complex object.

Ex: Make a Loan Object. Loan could be house loan, car loan ,
    education loan ..etc. Each loan will have different interest rate, amount ,  
    duration ...etc. Finally a complex object created through step by step process.
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This is a creational pattern as it is used to control class instantiation. The builder pattern is used to create complex objects with constituent parts that must be created in the same order or using a specific algorithm. An external class, known as the director, controls the construction algorithm.

Sample

using System;

using System.Collections.Generic;

using System.Linq;

using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApp_Design_Patterns
{

    class BuilderDesignPattern
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            //create a constructor object to start building
            Kid aKid = new Kid();
            aKid.Name = "Elizabeth";

            //Elizabeth use Monkey mold to make a monkey
            Console.WriteLine("{0} start making a monkey", aKid.Name);
            AnimalBuilder builderA = new MonkeyBuilder();
            aKid.MakeAnimal(builderA);
            builderA.aAnimal.ShowMe();

            //Elizabeth use Kitten mold to make a kitten
            Console.WriteLine("{0} start making a kitten", aKid.Name);
            AnimalBuilder builderB = new KittenBuilder();
            aKid.MakeAnimal(builderB);
            builderB.aAnimal.ShowMe();

            Console.Read();
        }
    }
    public abstract class AnimalBuilder
    {
        public Animal aAnimal;

        public abstract void BuildAnimalHeader();
        public abstract void BuildAnimalBody();
        public abstract void BuildAnimalLeg();
        public abstract void BuildAnimalArm();
        public abstract void BuildAnimalTail();
    }
    public class MonkeyBuilder : AnimalBuilder
    {

        public MonkeyBuilder()
        {
            aAnimal = new Monkey();
        }

        public override void BuildAnimalHeader()
        {
            aAnimal.Head = "Moneky's Head has been built";
        }

        public override void BuildAnimalBody()
        {
            aAnimal.Body = "Moneky's Body has been built";
        }

        public override void BuildAnimalLeg()
        {
            aAnimal.Leg = "Moneky's Leg has been built";
        }

        public override void BuildAnimalArm()
        {
            aAnimal.Arm = "Moneky's Arm has been built";
        }

        public override void BuildAnimalTail()
        {
            aAnimal.Tail = "Moneky's Tail has been built";
        }
    }
    public class KittenBuilder : AnimalBuilder
    {
        public KittenBuilder()
        {
            aAnimal = new Kitten();
        }

        public override void BuildAnimalHeader()
        {
            aAnimal.Head = "Kitten's Head has been built";
        }

        public override void BuildAnimalBody()
        {
            aAnimal.Body = "Kitten's Body has been built";
        }

        public override void BuildAnimalLeg()
        {
            aAnimal.Leg = "Kitten's Leg has been built";
        }

        public override void BuildAnimalArm()
        {
            aAnimal.Arm = "Kitten's Arm has been built";
        }

        public override void BuildAnimalTail()
        {
            aAnimal.Tail = "Kitten's Tail has been built";
        }
    }
    public abstract class Animal
    {
        public string Head { get; set; }
        public string Body { get; set; }
        public string Leg { get; set; }
        public string Arm { get; set; }
        public string Tail { get; set; }


        //helper method for demo the Polymorphism, so we can 
        //easily tell what type object it is from client.
        public abstract void Eat();

        //helper method for demo the result from client
        public void ShowMe()
        {
            Console.WriteLine(Head);
            Console.WriteLine(Body);
            Console.WriteLine(Leg);
            Console.WriteLine(Arm);
            Console.WriteLine(Tail);
            Eat();

        }
    }
    public class Monkey : Animal
    {
        //helper method to show monkey's property for demo purpose
        public override void Eat()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Since I am Monkey, I like to eat banana");
        }
    }
    public class Kitten : Animal
    {
        public override void Eat()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Since I am Kitten, I like to eat kitten food");
        }
    }
    public class Kid
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }

        //construct process to build an animal object, 
        //after this process completed, a object 
        //will be consider as a ready to use object.
        public void MakeAnimal(AnimalBuilder aAnimalBuilder)
        {
            aAnimalBuilder.BuildAnimalHeader();
            aAnimalBuilder.BuildAnimalBody();
            aAnimalBuilder.BuildAnimalLeg();
            aAnimalBuilder.BuildAnimalArm();
            aAnimalBuilder.BuildAnimalTail();
        }


    }
}
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blackwasp.co.uk/Builder.aspx –  Rajamohan Apr 20 '12 at 9:08
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For more information on when to use the Builder Pattern and its advantages you should check out my post for another similar question here

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2  
Links are better served as comments. You said "for more information," but you didn't provide any initial information. –  Eva Feb 23 '13 at 18:46
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If I read it three years later that mean others can too. –  Eva Feb 26 '13 at 0:48
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"Do you know what links are?" There is no way that was sincere :( Answering a question requires answering the question. If the question asks when is one more advantageous, at the very least your answer can say, "Builder is a good alternative to telescoping constructors. Factory is good when [answers that]. See here for more information" I actually up voted your answer for the other question because it answers the question (and quite well too). –  Eva Feb 28 '13 at 22:25
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Bald links are bad for answers because if the link goes dead for whatever reason, your answer is no longer an answer. If it's just in a comment, then it doesn't matter as much. –  Eva Feb 28 '13 at 22:28
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Abstract factory is similar to builder in that it too may construct complex objects. The primary difference is that the Builder pattern focuses on constructing a complex object step by step. Abstract factor's emphasis is on families of product objects(either simple or complex).

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An example

1) using abstract factory:

GUIFactory factory = new WindowsGUIFactory();
Button button = factory.createButton(); // **creates a WindowsButton**

2) using builder:

GUIBuilder builder = new WindowsGUIBuilder();
Button button = builder.createButton(); // **creates a Button.** 

As there is no WindowsButton class, he (the builder) must be in charge of correctly building the button, like button.setOS = windows.

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Builder and Abstract Factory

The Builder design pattern is very similar, at some extent, to the Abstract Factory pattern. That's why it is important to be able to make the difference between the situations when one or the other is used. In the case of the Abstract Factory, the client uses the factory's methods to create its own objects. In the Builder's case, the Builder class is instructed on how to create the object and then it is asked for it, but the way that the class is put together is up to the Builder class, this detail making the difference between the two patterns.

Common interface for products

In practice the products created by the concrete builders have a structure significantly different, so if there is not a reason to derive different products a common parent class. This also distinguishes the Builder pattern from the Abstract Factory pattern which creates objects derived from a common type.

From: http://www.oodesign.com/builder-pattern.html

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Build pattern emphasizes on complexity of creating object (solved by "steps")

Abstract pattern emphasizes "just" on "abstraction" of (multiple but related) objects.

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Difference is clear In builder pattern, builder will create specific type of object for you. You have to tell what builder has to build. In factory pattern , using abstract class you are directly building the specific object.

Here builder class acts as mediator between main class and specific type classes. More abstraction.

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In my opinion Builder pattern is used when you want to create an object from a bunch of other objects and creation of part needs to be independent of the object you want to create. It helps to hide the creation of part from the client to make builder and client independent. It is used for complex objects creation (objects which may consists of complicated properties)

While factory pattern specifies that you want to create objects of a common family and you want it to be cerated at once. It is used for simpler objects.

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