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I'm working on a C programming assignment, I need to simulate the operation of a 3 bit decoder. My compiler is complaining, this Wikipedia article gives a list of C operators, but my code still seems not to be working.

Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operators_in_C_and_C%2B%2B#Bitwise_operators

Compiler error:

logic.c: In function ‘three_bit_decoder’:
logic.c:33: warning: statement with no effect
logic.c:33: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘~’ token
logic.c:34: warning: statement with no effect
logic.c:34: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘b0’
logic.c:35: warning: statement with no effect
logic.c:35: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘~’ token
logic.c:36: warning: statement with no effect
logic.c:36: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘b0’
logic.c:38: warning: statement with no effect
logic.c:38: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘b0’
logic.c:39: warning: statement with no effect
logic.c:39: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘b0’
logic.c:40: warning: statement with no effect
logic.c:40: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘~’ token
logic.c:41: warning: statement with no effect
logic.c:41: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘b0’
logic.c:43: warning: return makes integer from pointer without a cast
logic.c:43: warning: function returns address of local variable
make: *** [logic.o] Error 1

Code:

int three_bit_decoder(BIT b0, BIT b1, BIT b2) {
    /* Returns an 8 bit number, by 2^3
     * 
     */
        int myIntDecoder[8]; 

        myIntDecoder[0] ~b0 + ~b1 + ~b2;
        myIntDecoder[1] b0 + ~b1 + ~b2;
        myIntDecoder[2] ~b0 + b1 + ~b2;
        myIntDecoder[3] b0 + b1 + ~b2;

        myIntDecoder[4] b0 + ~b1 + ~b2;
        myIntDecoder[5] b0 + ~b1 + b2;
        myIntDecoder[6] ~b0 + b1 + b2;
        myIntDecoder[7] b0 + b1 + b2;

        return myIntDecoder;
}
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1  
Missing the '=' right? –  itsmatt Sep 28 '11 at 2:04
    
Looks like you're missing some assignment operators. –  Elliot Nelson Sep 28 '11 at 2:04
    
Nothing like a dumbass attack. I caught that just after I posted. –  Snow_Mac Sep 28 '11 at 2:07
1  
return 1<<(((b2<<1)+b1<<1)+b0); –  gnibbler Sep 28 '11 at 2:16
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If those are assignment statements you're missing equal signs.

myIntDecoder[0] = ~b0 + ~b1 + ~b2;
myIntDecoder[1] = b0 + ~b1 + ~b2;
myIntDecoder[2] = ~b0 + b1 + ~b2;
myIntDecoder[3] = b0 + b1 + ~b2;

myIntDecoder[4] = b0 + ~b1 + ~b2;
myIntDecoder[5] = b0 + ~b1 + b2;
myIntDecoder[6] = ~b0 + b1 + b2;
myIntDecoder[7] = b0 + b1 + b2;

The next problem you'll encounter is that int myIntDecoder[8] declares an array of 8 ints, which is not the same as an 8-bit int. A char is 8 bits wide on (almost) all platforms; or you can be more explicit and use one of the standard typedefs:

#include <stdint.h>

uint8_t myIntDecoder;

So as not to leave you hanging, I should mention that assigning to individual bits in a variable is not as simple as byte[5] = 1. Doing it requires some clever use of shifting and other bitwise operations.

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... Nothing like a dumbass attack, I caught that seconds after posting. How do I setup an 8bit int? –  Snow_Mac Sep 28 '11 at 2:06
    
So do I cast the int array to the by or just add it? –  Snow_Mac Sep 28 '11 at 2:11
    
@Snow_Mac Get rid of the array. You don't need anything using square brackets. –  John Kugelman Sep 28 '11 at 2:14
    
uint8_t is the proper way with C99. It's in <stdint.h> IIRC. –  Aaron D. Marasco Sep 28 '11 at 2:18
    
so whats the byte[5] thing then? –  Snow_Mac Sep 28 '11 at 2:33
show 1 more comment

The bitwise operators are not your problem, you have syntax errors in your code. Think about how to do assignment of variables and the solution should come to you.

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Presumably you're after something like:

   myIntDecoder[0] = ~b0 + ~b1 + ~b2;
   // and likewise for the other 7 lines

That won't help with trying to return myIntDecoder though. For that, you'd probably want to move the array outside the function and (for one example) pass its address into the function.

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you are missing the equals operator.

myIntDecoder[7] = b0 + b1 + b2;

Also the not operator in c is ! not ~

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2  
! is logical not, ~ is bitwise not. ! != ~. –  Cameron Skinner Sep 28 '11 at 2:06
    
... According to Wikipedia, the ! is a logical operator, the ~ is a bitwise operator. Same idea different context. –  Snow_Mac Sep 28 '11 at 2:07
    
You guys are right, I really should be sleep now instead of answering in StackOverflow without thinking first. –  renam.antunes Sep 28 '11 at 2:11
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