Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have below merge sort program in algorithms book, it is mentioned that The main problem is that merging two sorted lists requires linear extra memory, and the additional work spent copying to the temporary array and back, throughout the algorithm, has the effect of slowing down the sort considerably. This copying can be avoided by judiciously switching the roles of "a" and "tmp_array" at alternate levels of the recursion.

My question is what does author mean "copying can be avoided by judiciously switching the roles of a and tmp_array at alternate levels of the recursion" and how it is possible in following code? Request to show an example how we can achieve this?

void mergesort( input_type a[], unsigned int n ) {

    input_type *tmp_array;
    tmp_array = (input_type *) malloc( (n+1) * sizeof (input_type) );
    m_sort( a, tmp_array, 1, n );
    free( tmp_array );
}

void m_sort( input_type a[], input_type tmp_array[ ], int left, int right ) {

    int center;
    if( left < right ) {

    center = (left + right) / 2;
    m_sort( a, tmp_array, left, center );
    m_sort( a, tmp_array, center+1, right );
    merge( a, tmp_array, left, center+1, right );
    }
}

void merge( input_type a[ ], input_type tmp_array[ ], int l_pos, int r_pos, int right_end ) {

    int i, left_end, num_elements, tmp_pos;
    left_end = r_pos - 1;
    tmp_pos = l_pos;
    num_elements = right_end - l_pos + 1;

    /* main loop */

    while( ( 1_pos <= left_end ) && ( r_pos <= right_end ) )

        if( a[1_pos] <= a[r_pos] )
            tmp_array[tmp_pos++] = a[l_pos++];
        else
            tmp_array[tmp_pos++] = a[r_pos++];

    while( l_pos <= left_end )  /* copy rest of first half */
        tmp_array[tmp_pos++] = a[l_pos++];

    while( r_pos <= right_end ) /* copy rest of second half */
        tmp_array[tmp_pos++] = a[r_pos++];

    /* copy tmp_array back */
    for(i=1; i <= num_elements; i++, right_end-- )
        a[right_end] = tmp_array[right_end];

}
share|improve this question

I'm going to assume that, without looking at this code, it is performing merge sort by declaring a contiguous block of memory the same size as the original.

So normally merge sort is like this:

  • split array in half
  • sort half-arrays by recursively invoking MergeSort on them
  • merge half-arrays back

I'm assuming it's recursive, so no copies will be done before we're sorting sub-arrays of size 2. Now what happens?

_ means it is memory we have available, but we don't care about the data in it

original:
   8    5    2    3      1    7    4    6
   _    _    _    _      _    _    _    _

Begin recursive calls:

recursive call 1:
  (8    5    2    3)    (1    7    4    6)
   _    _    _    _      _    _    _    _

recursive call 2:
 ((8    5)  (2    3))  ((1    7)  (4    6))
   _    _    _    _      _    _    _    _

recursive call 3:
(((8)  (5))((2)  (3)))(((1)  (7))((4)  (6)))
   _    _    _    _      _    _    _    _

Recursive calls resolving with merging, PLUS COPYING (slower method):

merge for call 3, using temp space:
(((8)  (5))((2)  (3)))(((1)  (7))((4)  (6)))    --\ perform merge
(( 5    8 )( 2    3 ))(( 1    7 )( 4    6 ))   <--/ operation

UNNECESSARY: copy back:
(( 5    8 )( 2    3 ))(( 1    7 )( 4    6 ))   <--\ copy and
   _    _    _    _      _    _    _    _       --/ ignore old

merge for call 2, using temp space:
(( 5    8 )( 2    3 ))(( 1    7 )( 4    6 ))    --\ perform merge
(  2    3    5    8  )(  1    4    6    7  )   <--/ operation

UNNECESSARY: copy back:
(  2    3    5    8  )(  1    4    6    7  )   <--\ copy and
   _    _    _    _      _    _    _    _       --/ ignore old

merge for call 1, using temp space:
(  2    3    5    8  )(  1    4    6    7  )    --\ perform merge
   1    2    3    4      5    6    7    8      <--/ operation

UNNECESSARY: copy back:
   1    2    3    4      5    6    7    8      <--\ copy and
   _    _    _    _      _    _    _    _       --/ ignore old

What the author is suggesting Recursive calls resolving with merging, WITHOUT COPYING (faster method):

merge for call 3, using temp space:
(((8)  (5))((2)  (3)))(((1)  (7))((4)  (6)))    --\ perform merge
(( 5    8 )( 2    3 ))(( 1    7 )( 4    6 ))   <--/ operation

merge for call 2, using old array as temp space:
(  2    3    5    8  )(  1    4    6    7  )   <--\ perform merge
(( 5    8 )( 2    3 ))(( 1    7 )( 4    6 ))    --/ operation (backwards)

merge for call 1, using temp space:
(  2    3    5    8  )(  1    4    6    7  )    --\ perform merge
   1    2    3    4      5    6    7    8      <--/ operation

There you go: you don't need to do copies as long as you perform each "level" of the merge-sort tree in lock-step, as shown above.

You may have a minor issue of parity, also as demonstrated above. That is, your result may be in your temp_array. You either have three options for dealing with this:

  • returning the temp_array as the answer, and release the old memory (if your application is fine with that)
  • perform a single array copy operation, to copy temp_array back into your original array
  • allow yourself to consume a mere twice-as-much memory, and perform a single cycle of merges from temp_array1 to temp_array2 then back to original_array, then release temp_array2. The parity issue should be resolved.
share|improve this answer

Start by thinking of merge sort in this way.

0: Consider the input array A0 as a collection of ordered sequences of length 1.

1: Merge each consecutive pair of sequences from A0, constructing a new temporary array A1.

2: Merge each consecutive pair of sequences from A1, constructing a new temporary array A2.

...

Finish when the last iteration results in a single sequence.

Now, you can obviously get away with just a single temporary array by doing this:

0: Consider the input array A0 as a collection of ordered sequences of length 1.

1: Merge each consecutive pair of sequences from A0, constructing a new temporary array A1.

2: Merge each consecutive pair of sequences from A1, overwriting A0 with the result.

3: Merge each consecutive pair of sequences from A0, overwriting A1 with the result.

...

Finish when the last iteration results in a single sequence.

Of course, you can be even smarter than this. If you want to be nicer to the cache, you might decide to sort top-down, rather than bottom-up. In this case, it hopefully becomes obvious what your textbook means when it refers to tracking the role of the arrays at different levels of recursion.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

Look at the very last part of the merge function. What if, instead of copying that data, you just used the knowledge that the sorted part is now in tmp_array instead of a when the function returns, and a is available for use as a temp.

Details are left as an exercise for the reader.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.