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I've been programming nearly all of my life (around 20+ years), and I don't think I can remember a single time when I was looking at a if-statement and think "Hmmm, this would be a good time to use XOR." The entire logical programming universe seems to revolve around just these three.

Granted, with AND/OR/NOT gates, you can make any other logical statement. However, there might be a time where it might save you some code to combine two or three statements into a single logical statement. Let's look at the 16 possible combinations of logical connectives:

  1. FALSE = Contradiction = 0, null, NOT TRUE
  2. TRUE = Tautology = 1, NOT FALSE
  3. X = Proposition X = X
  4. NOT X = Negation of X = !X
  5. Y = Proposition Y = Y
  6. NOT Y = Negation of Y = !Y
  7. X AND Y = Conjunction = NOT (X NAND Y)
  8. X NAND Y = Alternative Denial = NOT (X AND Y), !X OR !Y
  9. X OR Y = Disjunction = NOT (!X AND !Y)
  10. X NOR Y = Joint Denial = NOT (X OR Y), !X AND !Y
  11. X ⊅ Y = Material Nonimplication = X AND !Y, NOT(!X OR Y), (X XOR Y) AND X, ???
  12. X ⊃ Y = Material Implication = !X OR Y, NOT(X AND !Y), (X XNOR Y) OR X, ???
  13. X ⊄ Y = Converse Nonimplication = !X AND Y, NOT(X OR !Y), (X XOR Y) AND Y, ???
  14. X ⊂ Y = Converse Implication = X OR !Y, NOT(!X AND Y), (X XNOR Y) OR Y, ???
  15. X XOR Y = Exclusive disjunction = NOT (X IFF Y), NOT (X XNOR Y), X != Y
  16. X XNOR Y = Biconditional = X IFF Y, NOT (X XOR Y), !X AND !Y

So, items 1-2 involve zero variables, items 3-6 involve one, and items 7-10 are terms we are familiar with. (Though, we don't usually have a NAND operator, but at least Perl has "unless" for universal NOT.)

Items 11-14 seem like interesting ones, but I've never seen these in programming. Items 15-16 are the XOR/XNOR.

Can any of these be used for AND/OR/NOT simplification? If so, have you used them?

UPDATE: "Not equal" or != is really XOR, which is used constantly. So, XOR is being used after all.

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"Can any of these be used for AND/OR/NOT simplification?" Are you kidding? Look at the right side of your list. Now look at the left. Done. –  RBarryYoung Sep 28 '11 at 4:11
1  
And for what its worth, these operators are most often used for bit-masking functions, not logical/conditional simplification. –  RBarryYoung Sep 28 '11 at 4:13
    
Are you kidding? Look at the right side of your list. Now look at the left. Done. Yes, but I'm talking practically. XOR is about the only other function available in programming, and again, I've never really seen a spot to use it. Most of my complex logic statements involve several different variables, which wouldn't apply here. –  Brendan Byrd Sep 28 '11 at 11:33
    
"Are you kidding? Look at the right side of your list. Now look at the left. Done." - that was my initial reaction as well. I wonder whether we're not understanding what he means by "practical". –  Patrick87 Sep 28 '11 at 14:46
    
Practical as in real world examples. It just seems odd that we have all of these different logic gates and we only really use three. –  Brendan Byrd Sep 29 '11 at 1:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Going to close this question after the Not Equals/XOR thing. Out of the 16 possible operators, programmers use 9 of them:

FALSE, TRUE, X, Y, !X, !Y, AND (or ==), OR, XOR (or !=)

All of the other operators don't typically exist in programming languages:

X NAND Y = Alternative Denial = NOT (X AND Y), !X OR !Y
X NOR Y = Joint Denial = NOT (X OR Y), !X AND !Y
X ⊅ Y = Material Nonimplication = X AND !Y, NOT(!X OR Y), (X XOR Y) AND X, ???
X ⊃ Y = Material Implication = !X OR Y, NOT(X AND !Y), (X XNOR Y) OR X, ???
X ⊄ Y = Converse Nonimplication = !X AND Y, NOT(X OR !Y), (X XOR Y) AND Y, ???
X ⊂ Y = Converse Implication = X OR !Y, NOT(!X AND Y), (X XNOR Y) OR Y, ???
X XNOR Y = Biconditional = X IFF Y, NOT (X XOR Y), !X AND !Y

Perhaps there's room for them later on, because NAND/NOR seems pretty handy, and cleaner than typing NOT (X xxx Y).

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Consider this:

  if(an odd number of conditions are true) then return 1 else return 0

Using and/or/not, you might try

  if(one is true || three are true || ... 2n+1 are true) then return 1 else return 0

That's pretty ugly because you end up having to specify each of the 1-sets, 3-sets, 5-sets, ..., 2n+1 sets which are subsets of the set of your conditions. The XOR version is pretty elegant, though...

  if(C1 XOR C2 XOR ... XOR CN) then return 1 else return 0

For a large or variable N, this is probably better handled with a loop and counter system anyway, but when N isn't too large (~10), and you aren't already storing the conditions as an array, this isn't so bad. Works the same way for checking an even number of conditions.

You can come up with similar examples for the others, too. An interesting exercise would be to try programming something like

  if((A && !B) || (!A && B)) then return 1 else return 0

And see whether the compiler emits assembly language for ANDs, ORs and NOTs or is smart enough to recognize this is XOR and, based on this, emits (a possibly cheaper) XOR instruction.

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