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I attempted Project Euler's problem 10 using the very easy algorithm and the running time looks like hours. So I googled for an efficient algorithm and found this by Shlomif Fish. The code is reproduced below:

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    int p, i;
    int mark_limit;
    long long sum = 0;

    memset(bitmask, '\0', sizeof(bitmask));
    mark_limit = (int)sqrt(limit);

    for (p=2 ; p <= mark_limit ; p++)
    {
        if (! ( bitmask[p>>3]&(1 << (p&(8-1))) ) )
        {
            /* It is a prime. */
            sum += p;
            for (i=p*p;i<=limit;i+=p)
            {
                bitmask[i>>3] |= (1 << (i&(8-1)));
            }
        }
    }
    for (; p <= limit; p++)
    {
        if (! ( bitmask[p>>3]&(1 << (p&(8-1))) ) )
        {
            sum += p;
        }
    }

I have problems understanding the code. Specifically, how does this bit shifting code able to determine whether a number is prime or not.

   if (! ( bitmask[p>>3]&(1 << (p&(8-1))) ) )
        {
            /* It is a prime. */
            sum += p;
            for (i=p*p;i<=limit;i+=p)
            {
                bitmask[i>>3] |= (1 << (i&(8-1)));
            }
        }

Can someone please explain this code block to me, especially this part ( bitmask[p>>3]&(1 << (p&(8-1)? Thank you very much.

share|improve this question
    
By the way you can get same packing in C++ with bitset or vector<bool> (specialized container) without bit tricks. –  gorlum0 Sep 28 '11 at 13:04
    
And even in C you should use functions that abstract the mapping from bits to arrays. Writing code like this is bad style. –  starblue Sep 30 '11 at 10:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The code is a modified Sieve of Eratosthenes. He is packing one number into one bit: 0 = prime, 1 = composite. The bit shifting is to get to the correct bit in the byte array.

 bitmask[p>>3]

is equivalent to

 bitmask[p / 8]

which selects the correct byte in the bitmask[] array.

(p&(8-1))

equals p & 7, which selects the lower 3 bits of p. This is equivalent to p % 8

Overall we are selecting bit (p % 8) of byte bitmask[p / 8]. That is we are selecting the bit in the bitmask[] array which represents the number p.

The 1 << (p % 8) sets up a 1 bit correctly located in a byte. This is then AND'ed with the bitmask[p / 8] byte to see if that particular bit is set or not, thus checking whether p is a prime number.

The overall statement equates to if (isPrime(p)), using the already completed part of the sieve to help extend the sieve.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain further why "8" is used? The number p can be much bigger, such as 100000. What is so special about "8" that it is being used as the "base" in these bit shifting? Also, why when 1<<(p%8) is AND'ed with the bitmask[p/8], we can determine it is a prime number or not? Am I missing out some Maths theory here? –  Standstill Sep 28 '11 at 17:31
    
@Standstill, the sieve is a logical array of bits. If bit N is on, or true, then the number N is prime. These bits are implemented as an array of 8-bit bytes. That is where the magic number 8 comes from. The sieve could just as easily be implemented with 16/32/64-bit elements in which case the constant would be changed to match. The bit shifting and masking operations are used to address the desired byte and then the specific bit within. –  Blastfurnace Sep 28 '11 at 17:58
    
@Standstill: @Blastfurnace is correct, the 8 is the number of bits in a byte. Work through some examples by hand from p=5 to p=11 to get a feel for things. The ANDing is to check if the bit in bitmask[p/8] is set: 1&1=1, 0&1=0. That bit flags whether or not p is prime. I suggest that you read up on the Sieve of Eratosthenes. Write your own simpler implementation which will help you see what the code here is doing. –  rossum Sep 28 '11 at 20:09
    
Thank you. I think the information is enough for me to work through. –  Standstill Sep 29 '11 at 6:59

The bitmask is acting as an array of bits. Since you can't address bits individually, you first have to access the byte and then modify a bit within it. Shifting right by 3 is the same as dividing by 8, which puts you on the right byte. The one is then shifted into place by the remainder.

x>>3 is equivalent to x/8

x&(8-1) is equivalent to x%8

But on some older systems, the bit manipulations may have been faster.

The line sets the ith bit, where i has been determined not to be prime because it is a multiple of another prime number number:

bitmask[i>>3] |= (1 << (i&(8-1)));

This line checks that the pth bit is not set, which means it is prime, since if it wasn't prime it would have been set by the line above.

if (! ( bitmask[p>>3]&(1 << (p&(8-1))) ) )
share|improve this answer
    
The bit manipulations were never faster. The first C compilers were able to do it automatically. Most compilers do it even with optimization turned off. –  Dietrich Epp Sep 28 '11 at 6:14
    
@Dietrich Epp Actually there are still plenty of compilers out there which aren't able to do this optimization unless told to do so explicitly. If program performance is critical (and only then), and the code should be portable, it may be a good idea to optimize "division through shifts" manually, even though it makes the code ugly and far less readable. –  Lundin Sep 28 '11 at 6:51
    
@Lundin: That's somewhat surprising. Can you give any examples? –  Dietrich Epp Sep 28 '11 at 9:17
    
@Vaughn: So how does x/8 and x%8 able to determine prime or not? –  Standstill Sep 28 '11 at 9:33

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