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I don't know too much about ordered logits so perhaps I'm doing something silly, but the following seems straightforward and I don't know why vcov.polr gives me negative diagonals. I tried to follow the code in vcov.polr but got lost so I don't know what is wrong. Thanks for your help!

temp_fc <-
structure(list(the_index = c(4, 3, 3, 4, 4, 1, 3, 2, 3, 3, 3,
4, 4, 4, 1, 4, 4, 1, 4, 3, 4, 3, 3, 1, 4, 2, 4, 4, 4, 4, 3, 4,
1, 4, 4, 3, 4, 4, 2, 4, 1, 4, 4, 2, 3, 1, 4, 2, 1, 1, 4, 1, 4,
4, 4, 4, 1, 4, 3, 1, 4, 3, 4, 1, 4, 2, 3, 1, 4, 4, 1, 3, 2, 3,
2, 3, 3, 4, 1, 1, 4, 4, 4, 4, 1, 4, 4, 2, 4, 4, 4, 1, 1, 4, 3,
2, 4, 4, 1, 1), age = c(39L, 40L, 23L, 33L, 24L, 22L, 15L, 43L,
59L, 58L, 20L, 39L, 33L, 21L, 34L, 44L, 27L, 53L, 60L, 34L, 17L,
20L, 19L, 21L, 57L, 56L, 36L, 30L, 16L, 17L, 16L, 71L, 49L, 42L,
72L, 36L, 18L, 19L, 62L, 20L, 55L, 79L, 69L, 46L, 28L, 50L, 40L,
21L, 57L, 31L, 38L, 60L, 56L, 59L, 21L, 26L, 53L, 49L, 51L, 59L,
32L, 56L, 25L, 46L, 42L, 70L, 65L, 50L, 42L, 53L, 29L, 63L, 34L,
29L, 65L, 31L, 70L, 52L, 76L, 37L, 24L, 28L, 45L, 47L, 48L, 55L,
65L, 28L, 28L, 31L, 24L, 41L, 43L, 34L, 69L, 65L, 48L, 24L, 32L,
18L)), .Names = c("the_index", "age"), row.names = c("1006",
"1040", "1085", "1115", "1130", "1144", "1162", "1164", "1176",
"1178", "1181", "1192", "1223", "1258", "1259", "1307", "1311",
"1330", "1338", "1368", "1401", "1411", "1443", "1444", "1515",
"1538", "1600", "1628", "1632", "1683", "1692", "1701", "1710",
"1784", "1790", "1793", "1799", "1873", "1897", "1904", "1908",
"1982", "1988", "2015", "2029", "2052", "2065", "2077", "2088",
"2095", "2163", "10345", "10355", "10372", "10388", "10397",
"10414", "10415", "10417", "10421", "10428", "10430", "10456",
"10480", "10490", "10492", "10509", "10587", "10600", "10607",
"10609", "10617", "10625", "10626", "10630", "10640", "10674",
"10684", "10686", "10687", "10700", "10703", "10713", "10730",
"10740", "10747", "10750", "10762", "10792", "10794", "10803",
"10820", "10824", "10830", "10833", "10835", "10857", "10888",
"10917", "10933"), class = "data.frame")

library(MASS)
model_temp <-factor(the_index) ~ age + I(age^2)
the_OL <- polr(model_temp,temp_fc,method="logistic", Hess=TRUE)
diag(vcov(the_OL)) #this gives negative values
#so of course the following will have an error:
summary(the_OL)
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think this is due to your use of non-orthogonal polynomials in your model formulae; this appears to be causing the computational issues. With your code I get:

> the_OL2 <- polr(model_temp,temp_fc,method="logistic", Hess=TRUE)
> AIC(the_OL2)
[1] 254.6934

If I refit using orthogonal polynomials via poly(), I seem to get the same fit but without the numerical issues of negative variances:

> the_OL <- polr(factor(the_index) ~ poly(age, 2), temp_fc, method="logistic", 
+  Hess=TRUE)
> AIC(the_OL)
[1] 254.6934
> diag(vcov(the_OL))
poly(age, 2)1 poly(age, 2)2           1|2           2|3 
   3.38608675    3.65981581    0.05958267    0.04704916 
          3|4 
   0.04103139

The residual deviances reported for the two models are the same and the fitted values from the two models are almost the same (near as matters).

share|improve this answer
    
interesting. I still don't understand what's going on. The coefficients change drastically when I use your method. Do you happen to know of any online resources where I can read some more? Thank you! –  Xu Wang Sep 28 '11 at 13:53
1  
Of course they change @XuWang the "variables" poly(age, 2)1 and poly(age, 2)2 are very different from the ones formed by age and I(age^2). The latter are correlated variables and that is what I presume is causing the fitting problem. The model is the same though. The intercepts change because these represent the value of the response in each group when the covariates are zero - and this is now not 0 age, it is 0 on the scale of the orthogonal polynomial basis for age. I'm not that familiar with these things to point you to a reference or resource where you can read more. –  Gavin Simpson Sep 28 '11 at 14:01
    
Thank you Gavin. I'm still confused though. It works in Stata and gives the same coefficients and Stata has no trouble with the standard errors. I agree that they're highly correlated, but I don't think that should be a problem because the correlation is .97, which I've never had trouble with before. –  Xu Wang Sep 29 '11 at 2:14
    
@XuWang So take this up with the maintainers of the function in package MASS. I would be wary of claiming Stata gets it right though, unless you know the real result for the data to hand. All polr() is optimising a numerical function. You might also look at the lrm() function in the rms package which can also fit proportional odds models in R. See if it has problems with the non-orthogonal polynomials. –  Gavin Simpson Sep 29 '11 at 8:31

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