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I need to retrieve data via cross-domain XMLHttpRequest. To make this work in (almost) all browsers, I use native XHR first and, if that fails, flXHR.

The (working) code I currently have for this is as follows:

jQuery.support.cors = true; // must set this for IE to work

$.ajax({
    url: 'http://site.com/dataToGet', 
    transport : 'xhr',
    success: function(data) {
        console.log('Got data via XHR');
        doStuff(data);
    },
    error: function(xhr, textStatus, error) {
        console.log('Error in xhr:', error.message);
        console.log('Trying flXHR...');
        $.ajax({
            url: 'http://site.com/dataToGet',
            transport : 'flXHRproxy',
            success: function (data) {
                console.log('Got data via flXHR');
                doStuff(data);
            },
            error: function (xhr, textStatus, error) {
                console.log('Error in flXHR:', error.message);
                console.log('Both methods failed, data not retrieved.');
            }
        });
    }
});

This feels like a lot of code duplication to me, especially in the success handlers. Is there a more efficient way to do this? I'd really prefer to make one $.ajax call that would try both transports in turn, instead of having to use the error handler to make the call a second time. It's not too bad in this example, but rapidly gets more complicated if the success handler is longer or if the success handler has to itself issue another $.ajax call.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why don't you just wrap this in a function by itself? That's after all, how you end up reusing code. You can even pass functions as arguments to make sure that you don't have to repeat this code more than once.

To me this is pretty straight forward but maybe I've misunderstood.

function xhr(success) {
    $.ajax({ 
        success: success, 
        error: function() { 
            $.ajax({ success: success }) 
        } 
    });
}

Then just pass the success handler once

xhr(function(data){/*magic*/});

Or if you wanna basically avoid redundant configuration of the ajax call use the first object as a template, like this:

function xhr(success) {
    var ajaxParams = { success: success };
    ajaxParams.error = function() { 
        $.ajax($.extend(ajaxParams, { transport: 'xhr' })); 
    }
    $.ajax(ajaxParams);
}

I simplified the whole thing a bit, but I hope you get the point.

Edit

Reading that last bit, maybe this will give you some ideas... it's a variation of that last snippet.

function xhr(success) {
    var ajaxParams = { success: success };
    ajaxParams.error = function() { 
        var newParams = $.extend(ajaxParams, { transport: 'xhr' });
        newParams.success = function() {
            // do something
            // arguments is a special array, even if no parameters were
            // defined in any arguments where passed they will be found
            // in the order they were passed in the arguments array
            // this makes it possible to forward the call to another 
            // function
            success.apply(this, arguments); 
        }
        $.ajax(newParams); 
    }
    $.ajax(ajaxParams);
}
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I need to pass the results of one function into the next call, so the nested call gets all the results. –  Ian Sep 28 '11 at 14:02
    
Other than that, this is what I was looking for - and it does answer my question as written. I just can't figure out how to pass the values from one success handler to the next without using globals. (This is probably a separate question, but I haven't been able to find it - if you could point me to how to do this that would be very helpful.) Thanks! –  Ian Sep 28 '11 at 14:11
    
If you just declare a variable in a surrounding outer scope that variable will be captured in subsequent functions. This is what's commonly referred to as a closure. The variable will in this case represent the same memory location and can thus be used for communication (passing data). I believe this is similar to how you would accomplish this with a global but the scope is limited and this, it doesn't pollute the rest of your program. If you post a new question with details about exactly what you think you would want to do I might be able to provide you with some code and better explanation. –  John Leidegren Sep 29 '11 at 6:24
    
I made a last edit, maybe it answers your comment. –  John Leidegren Sep 29 '11 at 6:29

I've created a jquery-specific and slimmed-down fork of flxhr that simplifies your code sample above. You can see an example of usage in the "Usage" section in the README.

https://github.com/b9chris/flxhr-jquery-packed

In particular, you don't want to waste time waiting for a standard CORS request to fail. It's easy to determine whether flxhr is necessary by testing $.support.cors upfront (no need to override it). Then just use flxhr explicitly where necessary.

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