Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am getting a segmentation fault while running this code. I can't work out why this is happening - can anyone see a possible reason? (I have already got and initialized the semaphore's shared memory.)

My code:
   #include<stdlib.h>
   #include<sys/types.h>
   #include<sys/shm.h>
   #include<sys/ipc.h>
   #include<stdio.h>
   #include<sys/sem.h>

   union semun 
   {
   int val;
   struct semid_ds *buf;
   unsigned short *array;
   } arg;



  int main()
  {
  key_t semkey;
  int shmid,semid,nsem,sops;
  struct sembuf buf[1];

  char *ptrr,*shm,c,*s;

  semkey=ftok("/home/mawia/abc.c",'a');

  printf("entered into main of producer\n");
  if(semkey<0)
  {
   perror("ftok");
   exit(1);
  }

  shmid=shmget(semkey,30,0777);

  if(shmid<0)
  {
   printf("error");
   perror("shmget");
   exit(1);
  }

  shm=shmat(shmid,0,0);
  if(shm==(char *) -1)
  {
  perror("shm");
  exit(1);
  } 

  s=shm;
  semid=semget(semkey,1,0777);
 if(semid<0)
 {
  printf("error");
  perror("semget");
  exit(0);
 }

 ptrr=shm+1;
 *s='w';
 printf("going to check the value 0th semaphores\n");
 buf[0].sem_num=0;
 buf[0].sem_op=0;
  buf[0].sem_flg=0;
 buf[1].sem_num=0;
 buf[1].sem_op=1;
 buf[1].sem_flg=0;
  printf("entered the critical region\n");
 //printf("waiting to enter the buffer zone...");
 semop(semid,buf,2);

 printf("entered the critical region\v");
 if(*s!='r')
 {
  printf("\nPRODUCER IS PRODUCING\n\n\n");

  printf("ENTER DATA\n");

  while((c=getchar())!='\n')
  {
    *ptrr++=c;
  }
  *ptrr='\0';
  *s='r';
 } 

  else 
  printf("RESOURCE IS FULL:CAN'T PRODUCE");

 //printf("produced enough for  the consumer \nexiting from the buffer area now...");
 buf[0].sem_num=0;
 buf[0].sem_op=-1;
 buf[0].sem_flg=0;

 semop(semid,buf,1);

 ptrr=shm+1;

  if(!strcmp(ptrr,"exit"))
  {
  printf("exiting...");
  exit(0);
  }
  sleep(1);

 return 0;
  }
share|improve this question
3  
Try running with the debugger to find out where your code fails. Then edit this to a reasonable length and a more focused question. –  dmckee Apr 16 '09 at 20:57
3  
Did you get a core dump file? Try opening that up with gdb. –  Alan Apr 16 '09 at 20:58
    
@Mark Ingram: Sorry, I clobbered your edit. I tried to combine the two into the best of both worlds (and reverted your change of "while" to "whilst"! :P). –  Michael Myers Apr 16 '09 at 21:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

After a quick glance (very quick), i would say that it MAY be caused by

struct sembuf buf[1];

/*some other code*/

buf[1].sem_num=0;
buf[1].sem_op=1;
buf[1].sem_flg=0;

You are accessing memory outside of the buffer. buf[1] reserves memory in the stack for only one struct sembuf, you are trying to use 2. In that case, you should use

 struct sembuf buf[2]
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Maybe you'll remove the buf[0]'s from your code block to show that the "bad" code is the one accessing bug[1]. –  lothar Apr 16 '09 at 21:03
    
Sure, makes it clearer. Thanks. –  Tom Apr 16 '09 at 21:05
1  
really really thanks bro. that was the reason .really thanks for pointing out that. thanks to all for reply. –  mawia Apr 16 '09 at 21:22
    
get removed if buf[2] is defined. warning: Can't read pathname for load map: Input/output error. Reading symbols from /lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc.so.6...done. Loaded symbols for /lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc.so.6 Reading symbols from /lib/ld-linux.so.2...done. Loaded symbols for /lib/ld-linux.so.2 Core was generated by `./producer'. Program terminated with signal 11, Segmentation fault. [New process 6554] #0 0xb7fafd88 in strcmp () from /lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc.so.6 why? –  mawia Apr 17 '09 at 14:31
    
in the comment i have shown the out put of the core file after opening with gdb.even though the segmentation fault is removed using buf[2] but the core file shows that it is due to strcmp().when buf[1] is used and strcmp() is not used then there is no segmentation fault. can you explain this contradicting behaviour. –  mawia Apr 17 '09 at 14:34

Array allocation too small.

This example is generally too long to be considered a good example; try to find a smaller (minimal is ideal) case which replicates the error, particularly one which depends on as few external libraries as possible. Also, try running in the debugger and stepping through the code before asking.

share|improve this answer

Ah... there is obviously something very wrong when you declare

struct sembuf buf[1];

but a few lines later do

buf[1].sem_num=0;
buf[1].sem_op=1;
buf[1].sem_flg=0;
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for reply brother. thanks for pointing out that. –  mawia Apr 16 '09 at 21:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.