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I'm looking for something that will translate a string as follows, using only bash / standard Linux commands:

  1. Single-quotes surrounding a string should be removed
  2. Double-quotes surrounding a string should be removed
  3. Unquoted strings should remain the same
  4. Strings with unmatched surrounding quotes should remain the same
  5. Single-quotes that don't surround the string should remain
  6. Double-quotes that don't surround the string should remain

For example:

  • 'Food' should become Food
  • "Food" should become Food
  • Food should remain the same
  • 'Food" should remain the same
  • "Food' should remain the same
  • 'Fo'od' should become Fo'od
  • "Fo'od" should become Fo'od
  • Fo'od should remain the same
  • 'Fo"od' should become Fo"od
  • "Fo"od" should become Fo"od
  • Fo"od should remain the same

Thank you!

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1  
+1 for all of those acceptance tests! –  razlebe Apr 16 '09 at 21:37
2  
As most "customers" do, an extra one's been added afterwards that wasn't in the original set :-) –  richq Apr 16 '09 at 21:50
    
So.. backslash escapes are meaningless? "Food\" -> Food\ ? –  lhunath Apr 17 '09 at 6:43
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7 Answers 7

up vote 19 down vote accepted

This should do it:

sed "s/^\([\"']\)\(.*\)\1\$/\2/g" in.txt

Where in.txt is:

"Fo'od'
'Food'
"Food"
"Fo"od'
Food
'Food"
"Food'
'Fo'od'
"Fo'od"
Fo'od
'Fo"od'
"Fo"od"
Fo"od

And expected.txt is:

"Fo'od'
Food
Food
"Fo"od'
Food
'Food"
"Food'
Fo'od
Fo'od
Fo'od
Fo"od
Fo"od
Fo"od

You can check they match with:

diff -s <(sed "s/^\([\"']\)\(.*\)\1\$/\2/g" in.txt) expected.txt
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1  
Very close :-) echo \"fo\"bar\' | sed "s/([\"'])(.*)\1/\2/g" Got: fobar' Expected: "fo"bar' –  Jason Apr 16 '09 at 21:42
    
Great! Just go changing the requirements after the coding is done ;-) updated for that case. –  richq Apr 16 '09 at 21:46
1  
Here's one final requirements change :-) echo \"fo\'bar\' | sed -e "s/([\"'])(.*)\1\$/\2/g" Got: "fobar Expected: "fo'bar' –  Jason Apr 16 '09 at 21:51
3  
I hate regular expressions now. –  richq Apr 16 '09 at 21:55
2  
+1 for proving that 'Some people, when confronted with a problem, think “I know, I'll use regular expressions.” Now they have two problems.' Is as true as it gets! –  Flávio Amieiro Apr 17 '09 at 1:17
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VAR="'FOOD'"

VAR=`eval echo $VAR`
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1  
please add some explanation too!! –  Bhushan Kawadkar Jun 23 at 6:07
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Just stumbled upon this as well. For the first three test cases, eval echo $string works well. To get it to work for all cases requested and a few others, I came up with this (tested with bash and dash):

#!/bin/sh

stripquotes() {
    local firstchar="`substr "$1" 0 1`"
    local len=${#1}
    local ilast=$((${#1} - 1))
    local lastchar="`substr "$1" $(($len - 1))`"
    if [ "$firstchar" = '"' ] || [ "$firstchar" = "'" ] && [ $firstchar = $lastchar ]; then
        echo "`substr "$1" 1 $(($len - 2))`"
    else
        echo "$1"
    fi
}

# $1 = String.
# $2 = Start index.
# $3 = Length (optional). If unspecified or an empty string, the length of the
#      rest of the string is used.
substr() {
    local "len=$3"
    [ "$len" = '' ] && len=${#1}
    if ! (echo ${1:$2:$len}) 2>/dev/null; then
        echo "$1" | awk "{ print(substr(\$0, $(($2 + 1)), $len)) }"
    fi
}

var="'Food'"
stripquotes "$var"

var='"Food"'
stripquotes "$var"

var=Food
stripquotes "$var"

var=\'Food\"
stripquotes "$var"

var=\"Food\'
stripquotes "$var"

var="'Fo'od'"
stripquotes "$var"

var="\"Fo'od\""
stripquotes "$var"

var="Fo'od"
stripquotes "$var"

var="'Fo\"od'"
stripquotes "$var"

var="\"Fo\"od\""
stripquotes "$var"

var="Fo\"od"
stripquotes "$var"

# A string with whitespace should work too.
var="'F\"o 'o o o' o\"d'"
stripquotes "$var"

# Strings that start and end with the same character that isn't a quote or
# doublequote should stay the same.
var="TEST"
stripquotes "$var"

# An empty string should not cause errors.
var=
stripquotes "$var"

# Strings of length 2 that begin and end with a quote or doublequote should not
# cause errors.
var="''"
stripquotes "$var"
var='""'
stripquotes "$var"
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Just using Bash builtins (i.e. Bash parameter expansion):

IFS=' ' 

food_strings=( "'Food'" '"Food"' Food "'Food\"" "\"Food'" "'Fo'od'" "\"Fo'od\"" "Fo'od" "'Fo\"od'" '"Fo"od"' 'Fo"od'  )  

for food in ${food_strings[@]}; do 

   [[ "${food#\'}" != "$food" ]] && [[ "${food%\'}" != "$food" ]] && { food="${food#\'}"; food="${food%\'}"; } 

   [[ "${food#\"}" != "$food" ]] && [[ "${food%\"}" != "$food" ]] && { food="${food#\"}"; food="${food%\"}"; } 

   echo "$food"

done

For yet another example of Bash parameter expansion see:

http://codesnippets.joyent.com/posts/show/1816

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echo $string | tr -d 'chars to delete' also works, however 'tr' is known to be problematic on much older distros.

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You probably want to use sed...

echo $mystring | sed -s "s/^\(\(\"\(.*\)\"\)\|\('\(.*\)'\)\)\$/\\3\\5/g"
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It fails in a few cases. –  richq Apr 16 '09 at 21:26
    
I have not idea if it works, but +1 for the awesomeness of your sed command :) –  sigjuice Apr 16 '09 at 21:27
    
This is very close, but just a teeny bit off. echo \"fo\"bar\' | sed -s "s/^(\"(.*)\")\|(\'(.*)\')\$/\\2/g" Got: fobar' Expected: "fo"bar' –  Jason Apr 16 '09 at 21:35
    
Yes... for some reason I can't fathom, the last $ stubbornly refuses to match the end of my string. Working on it... –  Varkhan Apr 16 '09 at 21:50
    
Seems to work now... some parentheses were missing... –  Varkhan Apr 16 '09 at 21:55
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python -c "import sys;a=sys.stdin.read();a=a.strip();print (a[1:-1] if a[0]==a[-1] and a[0] in \"'\\\"\" else a)"

it doesn't handle edge cases extremely well (such as an empty string), but it will serve as a starting point. It works by striping the front and back character if they are the same and if they are ' or "

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I suppose, python is a standard Linux command nowadays... –  Lucas Jones Apr 16 '09 at 21:24
    
Jason explicitly said that he wants bash / standard Linux commands. Even though python is shipped with most of the commonly used distros, it is certainly not standard. If you install a basic Debian system, for example, it doesn't include python. –  Flávio Amieiro Apr 17 '09 at 1:04
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