Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the following code in __getattr__() if a refered variable is not found it would give an error.Similarly how to check whether a method exist or not

import string
import logging

class Dynamo:
 def __init__(self,x):
  print "In Init def"
  self.x=x
 def __repr__(self):
  print self.x
 def __str__(self):
  print self.x
 def __int__(self):
  print "In Init def"
 def __getattr__(self, key):
    print "In getattr"
    if key == 'color':
        return 'PapayaWhip'
    else:
        raise AttributeError


dyn = Dynamo('1')
print dyn.color
dyn.color = 'LemonChiffon'
print dyn.color
dyn.__int__()
dyn.mymethod() //How to check whether this exist or not
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 24 down vote accepted

How about dir() function before getattr()?

>>> "mymethod" in dir(dyn)
True
share|improve this answer

It's easier to ask forgiveness than to ask permission.

Don't check to see if a method exists. Don't waste a single line of code on "checking"

try:
    dyn.mymethod() //How to check whether this exist or not
    # Method exists, and was used.  
except AttributeError:
    # Method does not exist.  What now?
share|improve this answer
1  
+1: EAFP is certainly the "pythonic" approach. –  Johnsyweb Sep 28 '11 at 10:33
8  
But perhaps he really doesn't want to call it, just to check if there is that method (as it is in my case)... –  Flavius Sep 8 '12 at 13:57
7  
Note that this will fail if dyn.mymethod() raises an AttributeError itself. –  D K Jan 3 '13 at 20:49
    
Unlike .NET, this is actually more performant than checking if the method exists. I'm surprised (in a good way). –  ashes999 Nov 9 '13 at 4:38
1  
as @DK says, this will trap any AttributeError that may be raised by the method being checked for, which may be undesirable (not to mention that it would wrongly infer the absence of the method in that case). –  ShreevatsaR Jan 24 at 16:46

Check if class has such method?

hasattr(Dynamo, key) and callable(getattr(Dynamo, key))

or

hasattr(Dynamo, 'mymethod') and callable(getattr(Dynamo, 'mymethod'))

You can use self.__class__ instead of Dynamo

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for checking callable(). –  Johnsyweb Sep 28 '11 at 9:42
3  
None is not callable, so you could just do callable(getattr(Dynamo, 'mymethod', None)). I used this answer because my super().mymethod() could throw AttributeError –  sbutler Jul 26 '13 at 3:52
    
@sbutler Interesting that that works. According to PyCharm the signature for getattr is def getattr(object, name, default=None): I suspect that is not accurate because if it was I would expect passing None as the third parameter not to change the behaviour of the function. –  bszom Nov 13 '13 at 10:28
    
@bszom: In a python shell, help(getattr) says "When a default argument is given, it is returned when the attribute doesn't exist; without it, an exception is raised in that case." -- (and indeed you can check that getattr does raise an exception if the attribute is missing) so clearly, whatever PyCharm is, it's wrong. –  ShreevatsaR Jan 24 at 19:12

How about looking it up in dyn.__dict__?

try:
    method = dyn.__dict__['mymethod']
except KeyError:
    print "mymethod not in dyn"
share|improve this answer

I think you should look at the inspect package. It allows you to 'wrap' some of the things. When you use the dir method it also list built in methods, inherited methods and all other attributes making collisions possible, e.g.:

class One(object):

    def f_one(self):
        return 'class one'

class Two(One):

    def f_two(self):
        return 'class two'

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print dir(Two)

The array you get from dir(Two) contains both f_one and f_two and a lot of built in stuff. With inspect you can do this:

class One(object):

    def f_one(self):
        return 'class one'

class Two(One):

    def f_two(self):
        return 'class two'

if __name__ == '__main__':
    import inspect

    def testForFunc(func_name):
        ## Only list attributes that are methods
        for name, _ in inspect.getmembers(Two, inspect.ismethod):
            if name == func_name:
                return True
        return False

    print testForFunc('f_two')

This examples still list both methods in the two classes but if you want to limit the inspection to only function in a specific class it requires a bit more work, but it is absolutely possible.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.