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CQRS is about separating commmands and queries. We can add it easily several patterns & technologies like Event Sourcing, DDD, NoSQL, etc... but is ServiceBus a mandatory ?

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up vote 14 down vote accepted

I'd say messaging and a service bus is optional.

CQRS simply means decomposing your application so that the Read and Write parts of your application can be optimized for the respective concern. Commands can be handled directy, even Events, if you decide to use them, can be dispatched synchronously.

A good reference for using an internal dispatcher is Greg Young's simple examle.

Update: Rob Ashton has just posted a very good article on what CQRS is and how not to make it more complicated than it actually is.

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No serviceBus is not mandatory, it's simply one of the technologies that be used to implement CQRS, for example Event Pub/Sub. If anything, Event Sourcing & DDD have a closer relationship to CQRS than ServiceBus.

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CQRS is based on CQS, but how can we say that doing CQS is doing CQRS ? according to gregory youngs, I remember him saying in one of his webcast presenting CQRS that CQRS is different than CQS in that it is at the architectural level. What does it means if the use of DDD, Event Sourcing are optionals ? –  Gui Sep 28 '11 at 10:13
    
CQRS is an application of CQS on an architectural level. Bertrand Meyer's CQS principle is being applied on method level and in itself has few architectural implications. To minimize confusion I'd take CQRS and CQS as being completely separate because the level where it's being applied is so different. Similar is only the underlying principle itself: Asking a question should not change the answer. –  Dennis Traub Sep 29 '11 at 9:39

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