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Consider the following code, compiled with g++ problem.cpp -o problem:

#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    while(1){}
    return 0;
}

When this code is executed, the command top reports that ~80K of memory is being consumed.

Now consider this code:

#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    vector<int> testVec;
    for(int i = 0;i<100000000;i++)testVec.push_back(i);
    while(1){}
    return 0;
}

As expected, top report that around ~300MB of memory is consumed.

Now finally, consider this code:

#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    vector<int> testVec;
    for(int i = 0;i<100000000;i++)testVec.push_back(i);
    testVec.clear();
    vector<int>().swap(testVec);
    while(1){}
    return 0;
}

Now top reports that ~4196K is being consumed(!) -- why isn't it only ~80K is as in the first example? How can I finally free up that last bit of memory that is presumably being consumed by the vector? I've read that in addition to .clear(), the 'swap trick' is meant to free up everything but apparently it's not working as I expected it would do. What am I missing?

share|improve this question
    
Vectors dynamically-allocate their data. How could they not? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 28 '11 at 10:15
    
...in the underlying implementation. I see now that perhaps my problem statement is indeed naive, but still the mind boggles.. –  Ben J Sep 28 '11 at 10:25
    
By the question's very nature you're talking about the lowest-level details of the underlying implementation. How can you simultaneously pretend to abstract them away? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 28 '11 at 10:29
    
You're absolutely right. Thanks for pointing it out. –  Ben J Sep 28 '11 at 10:30
    
No problem! :-) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 28 '11 at 11:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should probably just ignore it. The swap trick frees the memory from the vector, but that does not mean that the allocator (or even the malloc or equivalent implementation underneath) will yield the memory back to the system. That is, the vector is most probably not the one holding the memory up.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Correct. The OP is trying to formulate predictions about the behaviour of his process's memory usage, with absolutely no axioms to go on whatsoever other than a relatively arbitrary and naive code comparison to an empty program. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 28 '11 at 10:14
    
Hmmm...it just seems damn bizarre that this sort of thing can happen. I mean, the memory gets used because of the allocation and then I attempt to de-allocate it in the only way possible(?). So I guess my question now becomes: how can one ensure that the allocator will yield the memory back to the system? (Do I even have control over this?) –  Ben J Sep 28 '11 at 10:16
    
@Ben: No. This is something you should neither worry nor care about. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 28 '11 at 10:30
    
Right you are, thanks for your help! –  Ben J Sep 28 '11 at 10:32
1  
@Ben You cannot control that. In most cases it will not even be the C++ allocator, but the implementation of malloc, and they are tailored to perform that way because it makes the most sense in most of the situations. Very smart people working on operating systems have implemented those strategies into the allocators (system level malloc, not C++ allocator) because they provide the right balance of memory usage/performance. There might be a couple of things that you can do to minimize the effect, as for example calling reserve to minimize the memory fragmentation. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 28 '11 at 10:35

From what I know, there are two ways to deallocate memory on this case:

  1. Put the code that use vector in bracket (simple and efficient)

    {
       // ..........
    } 
    
  2. Use shared pointer, but make sure that there is exactly only one shared pointer. You can call "reset" in order to free up the memory.

    shared_ptr<vector<int> > testVec(new vector<int>);
    
share|improve this answer
    
-1: Sorry, but you completely missed the point, and these approaches are (more or less) functionally equivalent to the OP's program. Meanwhile, why would you ever use shared_ptr if you're going to mandate that you don't share it? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 28 '11 at 11:05
    
Oic. Thanks for the feedback. –  dip Sep 28 '11 at 11:58

Don't you think about using std::deque instead? It has different memory allocation policy and it has possibility to decrease allocated memory. Of course, you'll get some lack performance using large data sets.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Yuri, yes I did consider a deque but since I am only ever interested in adding items to the end of the array and since I never do any insertions of erasing of inner elements, its not really necessary. Besides, the problem as pointed out by David R. above, still holds in that the memory allocation / deallocation process is partially affected by its operating system dependent implementation. –  Ben J Sep 28 '11 at 11:41
    
-1: Misses the point in the same way as does dip's answer. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 28 '11 at 12:58

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