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It is posible to craete indexer in C#, but something like this:

public class MyClass
{
   Dictionary<int, string> myCollection = new Dictionary<int, string>();

   public string Value[int i]
   {
      get { return myCollection[i]; }
      set { myCollection[i] = value; }
   }
}

Thanks

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closed as not a real question by Stormenet, ColinE, Oded, Saeed Amiri, Graviton Sep 28 '11 at 11:43

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Have you tried running the code yourself? what does it do? does it work? –  ColinE Sep 28 '11 at 10:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, C# do not allows this.

Specification section 1.6.7.3 saying:

An indexer is a member that enables objects to be indexed in the same way as an array. An indexer is declared like a property except that the name of the member is this followed by a parameter list written between the delimiters [ and ].

I would suggest you to use simple method for this like:

public string GetValue(int key)
{
    if (dictionary.ContainsKey(key))
       .....
}

In your case you reffer dictionary items by key not an index, this is pretty defferent things.

PS: keep in mind that Dictionary does not persist order of the items and this could be vital for some cases!

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No,

Actually your property Value already have indexer from string and returns char. Probably you need something like this:

public class MyClass
{
   Dictionary<int, string> myCollection = new Dictionary<int, string>();

   public Dictionary<int, string> Value
   {
      get { return myCollection; }
      set { myCollection = value; }
   }
}

And it will be the behaviour what you expected.

string value = myClassInstance.Value[0];
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1  
+1, but probably better to expose an IDictionary interface, and drop the setter :) –  MattDavey Sep 28 '11 at 10:46
    
Yes but I don't want to return all dictionary, because this will be allowed too: myClassInstance.Value.Add(...), and this dictionary can include only 3 values, and other user cannot adding other values –  Robert Sep 28 '11 at 11:27
    
So, as an option you can: 1) create type with indexed and incapsulate dictionary in it (if you very want index); 2) Change property to methor GetValue(int key); –  Samich Sep 28 '11 at 11:30
    
Ok I will do like this: public int Currenti { get; set; } public string Value { get { return myCollection[Currenti]; } set { myCollection[Currenti] = value; } } –  Robert Sep 28 '11 at 11:35
    
In that case I'd recommend calling them CurrentIndex and CurrentValue –  MattDavey Sep 28 '11 at 15:45

You can't do it that way, (not supported by C#)

How about instead

public class MyClass
{
   public MyClass()
    {
          Values = new Dictionary<int, string>()
     }
      public Dictionary<int, string> Values { get; set }   
}

which will then allow you to do

MyClass foo = new MyClass();
var someVal = foo.Values[3];
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