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I'm trying to call an explicitly implemented interface method implemented on the base class but just can't seem to get it to work. I agree the idea is ugly as hell, but I've tried every combination I can think of, to no avail. In this case, I can change the base class, but thought I'd ask the question to satisfy my general curiosity.

Any ideas?

// example interface
interface MyInterface
{
    bool DoSomething();
}

// BaseClass explicitly implements the interface
public class BaseClass : MyInterface
{
    bool MyInterface.DoSomething()
    {
    }
}

// Derived class 
public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    // Also explicitly implements interface
    bool MyInterface.DoSomething()
    {
        // I wish to call the base class' implementation
        // of DoSomething here
        ((MyInterface)(base as BaseClass)).DoSomething(); // does not work - "base not valid in context"
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You cannot (it is not part of the interface available to subclasses). In that scenario, use something like:

// base class
bool MyInterface.DoSomething()
{
    return DoSomething();
}
protected bool DoSomething() {...}

Then any subclass can call the protected DoSomething(), or (better):

protected virtual bool DoSomething() {...}

Now it can just override rather than re-implement the interface:

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    protected override bool DoSomething()
    {
        // changed version, perhaps calling base.DoSomething();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks Marc - figured as much. –  cristobalito Sep 28 '11 at 12:26
    
@cristobalito as an aside... you can do that more directly in VB.NET; that, however, is not reason enough to switch language ;p –  Marc Gravell Sep 28 '11 at 13:49
    
No chance of that happening Marc! –  cristobalito Oct 6 '11 at 11:48
    
Is there a particular reason why C# can't support ((IInterface)base) if VB.NET can? It would be helpful when you are adding functionality to a library whose code you do not own. The only other options are reflection and wrapping a second base class instance. It can be a nightmare to keep the two instances in sync. –  jnm2 Oct 23 '13 at 13:06

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