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Here's my old code from WinForms:

    private void ValueChanged(double inValue1, double inValue2) {
        //only manual mode for this driver, so that's easy.
        if (ValueLabel.InvokeRequired) {
            ValueLabel.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(delegate {
                ValueLabel.Text = (inValue1* inValue2/ 1000).ToString("f1");
            }
                ));
        }
        else {
            ValueLabel.Text = (inValue1* inValue2/ 1000).ToString("f1");
        }
    }

Is there an easy way to convert this to be WPF friendly? So far, I have:

   private void KVPValueChanged(double inValue1, double inValue2) {
        if (ValueLabel.Dispatcher.Thread == Thread.CurrentThread){
            ValueLabel.Content = (inValue1* inValue2/ 1000).ToString("f1");
        } else {
            ValueLabel.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(delegate {
                ValueLabel.Content = (inValue1* inValue2/ 1000).ToString("f1");
            });
        }
    }

But that second 'delegate' call fails. How can I invoke this delegate? I suppose I can go through the whole making a delegate method, making an instance of the delegate method, invoking that particular instance, etc, but I thought the whole point of these anonymous delegates was to avoid that hassle. Plus, my old winforms code has that first implementation all over the place, so I'd really like to avoid having to de-anonymize all my delegates.

Edit: I can try to use the MethodInvoker like I was before, but then the compiler gets confused. MethodInvoker is part of System.Windows.Forms, so using that approach doesn't work. As in:

    private void ValueChanged(double inValue1, double inValue2) {
        if (ValueLabel.Dispatcher.Thread == Thread.CurrentThread) {
            ValueLabel.Content = (inValue1* inValue2/ 1000).ToString("f1");
        }
        else {
            ValueLabel.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new System.Windows.Forms.MethodInvoker(delegate {
                ValueLabel.Content = (inValue1* inValue2/ 1000).ToString("f1");
            }));
        }
    }

That use of MethodInvoker is not kosher. Is there a separate implementation of it, or some other way to use the same behavior?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you need to change the signature of the delegate:

ValueLabel.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Normal, (ThreadStart)delegate(invalue1, invalue2){
    ValueLabel.Content = ...

Also, look up using the BackgroundWorker component. Not just for wpf but also for the winform async operations.

share|improve this answer
    
The methodinvoker call doesn't work... – mmr Apr 16 '09 at 22:46
    
der. forgot to include the windows forms library, which is where method invoker is. – mmr Apr 16 '09 at 22:48
    
sry, spoke too soon before looking back into my Pro WPF book for the real answer :) – ChrisPelatari Apr 16 '09 at 22:53
    
Yes, it does appear that 'ThreadStart' is the magic word here. Thanks! – mmr Apr 16 '09 at 23:01

System.Windows.Forms.MethodInvoker is simply a Delegate that take no parameters and returns void. In WPF, you can just replace it with System.Action. There are also other built-in Delegates that accept parameters, return values, or both.

In your case,

ValueLabel.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new System.Windows.Forms.MethodInvoker(delegate {
            ValueLabel.Content = (inValue1* inValue2/ 1000).ToString("f1");
        }));

becomes

ValueLabel.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(delegate() {
            ValueLabel.Content = (inValue1* inValue2/ 1000).ToString("f1");
        }));
share|improve this answer

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