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Say that I wanted to return 6 arrays from one method to another (in another class). What is the best way of doing this and why?

This is what I have so far.

 public Object getData()throws FileNotFoundException{
    counter = 0;
    Scanner f = new Scanner(new File("Contacts.txt")).useDelimiter(",");
    while (f.hasNext()){
        firstNames[counter] = f.next();
        lastNames[counter] = f.next();
        emailList[counter] = f.next();
        ageList[counter] = f.next();
        imgLoc[counter] = f.nextLine();
        counter++;
    }
    f.close();

    firstNames = Arrays.copyOf(firstNames, counter);
    lastNames = Arrays.copyOf(lastNames,counter);
    emailList = Arrays.copyOf(emailList, counter);
    ageList = Arrays.copyOf(ageList, counter);
    imgLoc = Arrays.copyOf(imgLoc, counter);
    data = Arrays.copyOf(data, counter);
    for (int i = 0; i <= counter - 1; i++){
        data[i] = firstNames[i] + " " + lastNames[i] + ", " + ageList[i];
    }
    ArrayList<Object> arrays = new ArrayList<Object>();
    arrays.add(firstNames);
    arrays.add(lastNames);
    arrays.add(emailList);
    arrays.add(ageList);
    arrays.add(imgLoc);
    arrays.add(data);

    return arrays;
}

Using an ArrayList was a guess. I'm not sure if I'm headed in the right direction there.

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3 Answers 3

I think this is a terrible idea.

I'd prefer one object that encapsulates first, last, email, age, and image into a Person class and return a List of those.

Java's an object-oriented language. You'll do better if you stop thinking in terms of primitives like Strings, ints, and arrays and start thinking in terms of objects. Encapsulate things that are meant to be together into a single object whenever you can.

Here's how I'd write that method:

public List<Person> readPersons(File file) throws FileNotFoundException {

    List<Person> persons = new LinkedList<Person>();

    Scanner f = new Scanner(file).useDelimiter(",");
    while (f.hasNext()){
        String first = f.next();
        String last = f.next();
        String email = f.next();  
        String age = f.next(); // age ought to be a positive integer
        String imageLocation = f.nextLine();
        persons.add(new Person(first, last, email, age, imageLocation));
    }

    return persons;
}

Less code, and easier to understand.

share|improve this answer
    
Notice that I passed in the file rather than hard-wiring it. More flexible. Think about that Person class and all the things you can do to enforce what creating a correct one means. Can email be null? Blank? What about imageLocation? What happens if Person doesn't have an email or an image? How will you create an object for Madonna or Sting, who only have one name? Lots to think about. –  duffymo Sep 28 '11 at 11:47
    
Ah sweet that looks much better! I'm still fairly new (as I'm sure you noticed) at OOP so this is a good learning step for me! Thanks! –  user968366 Sep 28 '11 at 11:49

Cleaner implementation (though lacking in error checking...)

public class Person {
    private final String fName;
    private final String lName;
    private final String email;
    private final String age;
    private final String imgLoc;

    public Person(String fName, String lName, String email, String age,
            String imgLoc) {
        super();
        this.fName = fName;
        this.lName = lName;
        this.email = email;
        this.age = age;
        this.imgLoc = imgLoc;
    }

    /* ...Getters here... */
}

public Object getData()throws FileNotFoundException{
    ArrayList<Person> out = new ArrayList<Person>();

    Scanner f = new Scanner(new File("Contacts.txt")).useDelimiter(",");
    while (f.hasNext()){
        out.add(new Person(
                f.next(),
                f.next(),
                f.next(),
                f.next(),
                f.next() ));
    }
    f.close();

    return out;
}
share|improve this answer

Here's what I would do:

public static class Person {
    public final String firstName, lastName, email, age, imgLoc;

    Person(String firstName, String lastName, String email, String age, String imgLoc) {
        this.firstName = firstName;
        this.lastName = lastName;
        this.email = email;
        this.age = age;
        this.imgLoc = imgLoc;
    }
}

public List<Person> getData() throws FileNotFoundException {
    ArrayList<Person> list = new ArrayList<Person>();
    Scanner f = new Scanner(new File("Contacts.txt")).useDelimiter(",");
    while (f.hasNext()) {
        list.add(new Person(f.next(), f.next(), f.next(), f.next(), f.nextLine()));
    }
    f.close();
    return list;
}

Update: An almost identical answer was posted by claymore1977 as I was writing this. The only notable difference is that I declared the type of the method to be List, which is what it actually is, while he retained your declared type of Object.

Update 2: Oh, one more difference. He declared members of the return class private, with getters, while I used public fields. Since they are final, I would not bother with getters, but it's a matter of taste.

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The copyOf copies the arrays (which are mutable), not the contained strings. This is useful if you want to avoid that the caller can modify your internal arrays. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Sep 28 '11 at 15:14
    
Ah, you're right. Still, I don't think the use of copyAll makes much sense here. But I simply removed the comment about copyAll from my answer, it's beside the point anyway. –  njlarsson Sep 29 '11 at 9:28

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