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HTML:

<div id="container">
  <div id="div1">div one floats to the left</div>
  <div id="div2">div two floats to the left</div>
</div>

CSS:

#container{ width:200px; background:gray; }
#div1 { float:left; background:red;}
#div2 { float:left; background:green; clear:left;}

in IE6/7:

enter image description here

notes:

I want the widths of the child divs like #div1 and #div2 be automatic according to their contents.

Since with inline-block it seems the line-height does not work, I use float.

I have tried adding an empty clear div after #div1, instead of clear in #div2, and that works.

Is there any other simpler solution and what's the bug? Appreciate your help.

share|improve this question
    
Solution to what problem? Is that a picture of what you want or a picture of what you get? – Sparky Sep 28 '11 at 16:11
    
The green div2 shows in multiple lines under IE6/7, which is not what I want. – xdyang Sep 29 '11 at 2:50
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Going with your solution...

Simply don't clear on the floating div, you're telling it to float but to be cleared too. Kinda confusing!

<style>
    #container{ width:200px; background:gray;}
    #div1 { float:left; background:red;}
    #div2 { float:left; background:green; }
</style>


<div id="container">
  <div id="div1">div one floats to the left</div>
  <br style="clear:left" />
  <div id="div2">div two floats to the left</div>
  <br style="clear:left" />
</div>

If you don't put the 1st <br />, ie6/7 will try to fit the 2nd div in the little space left. If you clear the div, it will put it on a new line, but give it the same length as if it was still to the right of the first div.

Your solution is good and simple enough in my opinion, you can go with it. Otherwise, here are 2 alternatives :

Alternative 1

Inline blocks works... if you use non-block element to begin with (not sure exactly why).

<style>
    #container{ width:200px; background:gray;}
    #div1 {  background:red; display:inline-block; line-height:30px;}
    #div2 { background:green; display:inline-block;width:auto; }
</style>
<div id="container">
  <span id="div1">div1</span>
  <span id="div2">div2 doesnt float blablabla</span>
</div>

Alternative 2

Use tables (not really good, but still, it works!)

<style>
    #container{ width:200px; background:gray;}
    #div1 {  background:red;}
    #div2 { background:green; }
</style>
<div id="container">
  <table><tr><td id="div1">div one floats to the left</td></tr></table>
  <table><tr><td id="div2">div two floats to the left</td></tr></table>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
goood answer!!!! – anglimasS Sep 28 '11 at 19:37
    
Thanks Kraz! I had mistaken inline-block for inline. inline-block leads to 100% width while inline auto-width. line-height works with inline-block, but not with inline. Maybe we could use padding to simulate line-height with inline. – xdyang Sep 29 '11 at 2:41

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