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Suppose I am on location M(latitude, longitude), and I have 3 More GPS coordinates A(lat, lon) ,B (lat, lon), and C(lat, lon) which are in range of 500 meters radius around M.

NOTE: I want to plot them on screen with respect to each other but NOT to any other map or anything else, and number of gps point around M may increase or decrease but will always be in radius 500 meters around M.

M will be at the center of screen. ScreeWidth=320, ScreenHeight=400

I have following information

M =  31.484083, 74.392708,

A =  31.483552, 74.392386 and distance from M is 66.42 Meters approximately
B =  31.483534, 74.392532 and distance from M is 63.23 Meters approximately
C =  31.483421, 74.392434 and distance from M is 78.00 Meters approximately

M will be drawn at WIDTH/2 and HEIGHT/2 of the screen

for A, B and C a CONVERSION FUNCTION is required that will return x and y in pixels with RESPECT to M and

screen width and height, keeping in mind these points will always be within 500 meter radius around M.

So that I can plot these points as shown in picture below.

Here is image :

image https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/J7PE6RuSqu7Pv9xv9D2PgQ?feat=directlink

I only need a conversion function for x and y, I know how to draw them on screen

share|improve this question
    
but what is your question ? what is your problem ? –  Adrien Plisson Sep 28 '11 at 15:44
    
Question is updated, i need a conversion function for android, to plot gps coordinate on screen, for more detail read the updated question –  Net Surgeon Sep 29 '11 at 9:48

2 Answers 2

Well, you need to implement a method that maps lat/lon to pixels, and pixels to lat lon...or a method that determines distance/azimuth from your reference point M, and then maps that distance/azomith to a pixel value.

If you wish to reference by lat/lon -- use a linear pixel map of some set number of degrees per pixel latitude and degrees per pixel longitude. I recommend going to google earth and checking what the different in latitude and longitude are at your area of interest are for 500 meters. latitude is set at 60 nautical miles per degree across all points in the world, and I am pretty sure longitude is something like 60*cos(lat) nautical miles per degree (approximation, google this).

If you wish to reference by distance, I recommend using a spherical earth approximation and building a method using haversines to determine distance across the great sphere. The best place to find examples of this is google or mathworks.com in the file exchange if you speak matlab.

After you have a way to map lat lon or dist/az to pix values..the rest is just drawing.

Good luck

Below is code called vreckon and geodistance, you can parse through it yourself if you want to implement in java -- i already did vreckon myself so I will give you the working vreckon java, if you want to do geodistance (check distance between two lat lon points) you will need to do yourself.

JAVA CODE FOR VRECKON ::::::

hvDistance is the horizontal distance from your lat lon point, latitudeOrigin and longitudeOrigin is your lat/lon position, and azimuth is direction from your origin.

The output will be the new latitude and longitude point. You should be able to go through matlab code and do the same with geodistance which is below if you want to implement in java. This is the exact stuff which will get you to the WGS84 standard accuracy. enjoy

private void vreckon(){
    double rng = hvDistance; 

    double m = 6;
    double a = 6378137.0;
    double f = 1/298.257223563;
    double b = a*(1-f);
    double lat0 = deg2rad(latitudeOrigin);
    double lon0 = deg2rad(longitudeOrigin);
    double az = deg2rad(azimuth);

    double axa = a*a;
    double bxb = b*b;

    double tan_U1 = (1-f)*Math.sin(lat0)/Math.cos(lat0);

    double U1 = Math.atan(tan_U1);
    double cos_alfa1 = Math.cos(az);
    double sig1 = Math.atan2(tan_U1, cos_alfa1);

    double cos_U1 = Math.cos(U1);
    double sin_alfa1 = Math.sin(az);

    double sin_alfa = cos_U1*sin_alfa1;

    double cos2_alfa = (1-sin_alfa)*(1+sin_alfa);
    double uxu = cos2_alfa*(axa-bxb)/bxb;

    double A = 1+uxu/16384*(4096+uxu*(-768+uxu*(320-175*uxu)));
    double B = uxu/1024*(256+uxu*(-128+uxu*(74-47*uxu)));

    double sig = rng/(b*A);

    double change = 1;

    double twosig_m;
    double cos_twosig_m;
    double cos2_twosig_m;
    double dsig;
    double sigold;

    while(Math.abs(change) > 1e-9){
        twosig_m = 2*sig1+sig;
        cos_twosig_m = Math.cos(twosig_m);
        cos2_twosig_m = cos_twosig_m*cos_twosig_m;
        dsig = B*Math.sin(sig)*(cos_twosig_m+1/4*B*(Math.cos(sig)*(-1+2.*cos2_twosig_m)-1/6*B*cos_twosig_m*(-3+4*(Math.sin(sig)*Math.sin(sig)))*(-3+4*cos2_twosig_m)));
        sigold = sig;
        sig = rng/(b*A)+dsig;
        change = sig-sigold;
    }

    twosig_m = 2*sig1+sig;

    cos_twosig_m = Math.cos(twosig_m);
    cos2_twosig_m = cos_twosig_m*cos_twosig_m;
    double sin_U1 = Math.sin(U1);

    double cos_sig = Math.cos(sig);
    double sin_sig = Math.sin(sig);
    double sin2_alfa = sin_alfa*sin_alfa;

    double latOut = Math.atan2(sin_U1*cos_sig+cos_U1*sin_sig*cos_alfa1,(1-f)*Math.sqrt(sin2_alfa+(sin_U1*sin_sig-cos_U1*cos_sig*cos_alfa1)*(sin_U1*sin_sig-cos_U1*cos_sig*cos_alfa1)));

    double lambda = Math.atan2(sin_sig*sin_alfa1,cos_U1*cos_sig-sin_U1*sin_sig*cos_alfa1);
    double C = f/16*cos2_alfa*(4+f*(4-3*cos2_alfa));
    double L = lambda-(1-C)*f*sin_alfa*(sig+C*sin_sig*(cos_twosig_m+C*cos_sig*(-1+2*cos2_twosig_m)));

    double lonOut = L+lon0;

    latOut = rad2deg(latOut);
    lonOut = rad2deg(lonOut);

    reckonedLatitude = latOut;
    reckonedLongitude = lonOut;
}

MATLAB CODE FOR GEODISTANCE :::::

function [r az] = geodistance(lat1,lon1,lat2,lon2,ellip,earthR)
%GEODISTANCE: Calculates the distance in meters between two points on earth surface.
%
% Usage:  r = geodistance(lat1,lon1,lat2,lon2, ellipsoid ) ;
%
%     Coordinates values should be specified in decimal degrees.
%     Method can be an integer between 1 and 23, default is m = 6.
%         Methods 1 and 2 are based on spherical trigonometry and a
%         spheroidal model for the earth, respectively.
%     Methods 3 to 24 use Vincenty's formulae, based on ellipsoid
%         parameters.
%         Here it follows the correspondence between m and thge type of
%         ellipsoid:
%
%         m =  3 -> ANS ,        m =  4 -> GRS80,    m = 5 -> WGS72,
%         m =  6 -> WGS84,       m =  7 -> NSWC-9Z2,
%         m =  8 -> Clarke 1866, m =  9 -> Clarke 1880,
%         m = 10 -> Airy 1830,
%         m = 11 -> Bessel 1841 (Ethiopia,Indonesia,Japan,Korea),
%         m = 12 -> Bessel 1841 (Namibia),
%         m = 13 -> Sabah and Sarawak (Everest,Brunei,E.Malaysia),
%         m = 14 -> India 1830, m = 15 -> India 1956,
%         m = 16 -> W. Malaysia and Singapore 1948,
%         m = 17 -> W. Malaysia 1969,
%         m = 18 -> Helmert 1906, m = 19 -> Helmert 1960,
%         m = 20 -> Hayford International 1924,
%         m = 21 -> Hough 1960, m = 22 -> Krassovsky 1940,
%         m = 23 -> Modified Fischer 1960,
%         m = 24 -> South American 1969.
%
%     Important notes:
%
%    1)South latitudes are negative.
%    2)East longitudes are positive.
%    3)Great circle distance is the shortest distance between two points
%          on a sphere. This coincides with the circumference of a circle which
%          passes through both points and the centre of the sphere.
%    4)Geodesic distance is the shortest distance between two points on a spheroid.
%    5)Normal section distance is formed by a plane on a spheroid containing a
%          point at one end of the line and the normal of the point at the other end.
%          For all practical purposes, the difference between a normal section and a
%          geodesic distance is insignificant.
%    6)The method m=2 assumes a spheroidal model for the earth with an average
%          radius of 6364.963 km. It has been derived for use within Australia.
%          The formula is estimated to have an accuracy of about 200 metres over 50 km,
%          but may deteriorate with longer distances.
%          However, it is not symmetric when the points are exchanged.
%***************************************************************************************
% Based loosely from code from orodrig@aulg.pt
% Vastly modified and improved.
% By J. Sullivan 12/2010
%***************************************************************************************

%% Defensive Programming

error(nargchk(4,6,nargin));

if any([isempty(lat1) isempty(lon1) isempty(lat2) isempty(lon2)]);
    error('One or more input arguments are empty.')
end
%% Farm out to GPU, if possible
if any([numel(lat1) numel(lat2) numel(lon1) numel(lon2)] >  250000) ...
        && ~any([numel(lat1) numel(lat2) numel(lon1) numel(lon2)] > 6000000)
    [lat1 lat2 lon1 lon2] = makeIntoGPUArrays(lat1,lat2,lon1,lon2);
end
%% Prepare the Data
r = [ ];
lambda1 = lon1*pi/180;
phi1 = lat1*pi/180;
lambda2 = lon2*pi/180;
phi2 = lat2*pi/180;
isEast = lon1 < lon2;
L = lambda2 - lambda1;
%% Load Earth Ellipsoid Models
alla = [earthRadius 0 6378160 6378137.0 6378135 6378137.0 6378145 6378206.4 6378249.145,...
    6377563.396 6377397.155 6377483.865,...
    6377298.556 6377276.345 6377301.243 6377304.063 6377295.664 6378200 6378270 6378388  6378270 6378245,...
    6378155 6378160];

allf = [0 0  1/298.25 1/298.257222101 1/298.26 1/298.257223563 1/298.25 1/294.9786982 1/293.465,...
    1/299.3249646 1/299.1528128,...
    1/299.1528128 1/300.8017 1/300.8017 1/300.8017 1/300.8017 1/300.8017 1/298.3 1/297 1/297 1/297,...
    1/298.3 1/298.3 1/298.25];
%% Choose Ellipsoid
if nargin > 4 && length(ellip) == 2;
    m = inf;
    a = ellip(1);
    b = a*cos(ellip(2));
    f = (a-b)/a;
elseif nargin < 5
    m = 6;
    a = alla(6);
    f = allf(6);
    b = a*(1-f);
elseif length(ellip) == 1
    m = ellip;
    a = alla(ellip);
    f = allf(ellip);
    b = a*(1-f);
end
samePoint = gather(abs( lambda1 - lambda2 ) < eps) & gather(abs( phi1 - phi2 ) < eps);
%% Sheperical Earth
if m == 1 % Great Circle Distance, based on spherical trigonometry
    clear lat1 lat2 lon1 lon2
    if nargin < 6; earthR = a; end
    tmp = sin(phi1).*sin(phi2)+cos(phi1).*cos(phi2).*cos(lambda2-lambda1);
    tmp(tmp > 1) = 1;
    r = earthR.*acos(tmp);
    r = gather(abs(r));
    if nargout > 1
        az = atan2(cos(phi2).*sin(lambda2-lambda1),cos(phi1).*sin(phi2)...
            -sin(phi1).*cos(phi2).*cos(lambda2-lambda1));
        % Azimuths are undefined at the poles, so we choose a convention: zero at
        % the north pole and pi at the south pole.
        az(phi1 <= -pi/2) = 0;
        az(phi2 >=  pi/2) = 0;
        az(phi2 <= -pi/2) = pi;
        az(phi1 >=  pi/2) = pi;
        az = gather(rad2deg(az));
    end

elseif m == 2 % Spheroidal model for the earth
    % Azimuth Calculations for this model are NOT consistant with a
    % spheriod.

    term1 = 111.08956*( lat1 - lat2 + 0.000001 );
    term2 = cos( phi1  + ( (phi2 - phi1)/2 ) );
    term3 = ( lon2 - lon1 + 0.000001 )/( lat2 - lat1 + 0.000001 );
    r = 1000*abs( term1/cos( atan( term2*term3 ) ) );
    if nargout > 1
        az = atan2(cos(phi2).*sin(lambda2-lambda1),cos(phi1).*sin(phi2)...
            -sin(phi1).*cos(phi2).*cos(lambda2-lambda1));
        % Azimuths are undefined at the poles, so we choose a convention: zero at
        % the north pole and pi at the south pole.
        az(phi1 <= -pi/2) = 0;
        az(phi2 >=  pi/2) = 0;
        az(phi2 <= -pi/2) = pi;
        az(phi1 >=  pi/2) = pi;
        az = rad2deg(az);
    end

else
    %% Apply Vincenty's formulae
    clear lambda1 lambda2 lat1 lat2 lon1 lon2

    axa = a^2;
    bxb = b^2;

    U1 = atan( ( 1 - f )*tan( phi1 ) );
    U2 = atan( ( 1 - f )*tan( phi2 ) );

    clear phi1 phi2

    lambda     =  L;
    lambda_old = sqrt(-1);
    ntrials = 0;

    while gather(any(any( abs( lambda - lambda_old ) > 1e-9 )))

        ntrials = ntrials + 1;

        lambda_old = lambda;
        sin_sigma = sqrt( ( cos(U2).*sin(lambda) ).^2 + ( cos(U1).*sin(U2) - sin(U1).*cos(U2).*cos(lambda) ).^2 );
        cos_sigma = sin( U1 ).*sin( U2 ) + cos( U1 ).*cos( U2 ).*cos( lambda );
        sigma = atan2( sin_sigma,cos_sigma );
        sin_alpha = cos( U1 ).*cos( U2 ).*sin( lambda )./sin_sigma;
        cos2_alpha = 1 - sin_alpha.^2;
        cos_2sigmam = cos_sigma - 2.*sin( U1 ).*sin( U2 )./cos2_alpha;

        C = (f/16).*cos2_alpha.*( 4 + f.*( 4 - 3.*cos2_alpha ) );

        lambda  = L + ( 1 - C ).*f.*sin_alpha.*( sigma + C.*sin_sigma.*( ...
            cos_2sigmam + C.*cos_sigma.*( -1 + 2*( cos_2sigmam ).^2 ) ) );

        if ntrials > 1000
            disp('Convergence failure...')
            return
        end
    end
    clear C sin_alpha lambda_old L
    %% Get Distance After Convergence acheived
    uxu = cos2_alpha.*(axa - bxb)./bxb;
    clear cos2_alpha bxb axa
    A = 1 + (uxu/16384).*(4096 + uxu.*(-768 + uxu.*(320 - 175.*uxu)));
    B = (uxu./1024).*(256 + uxu.*(-128 + uxu.*(74 - 47.*uxu)));
    clear uxu
    delta_sigma = B.*sin_sigma.*(cos_2sigmam + (B/4).*(cos_sigma.*...
        (-1 + 2.*cos_2sigmam.^2) -(B/6).*cos_2sigmam.*(-3 + 4.*sin_sigma.^2)...
        .*(-3 + 4.*cos_2sigmam.^2)));
    clear sin_sigma cos_sigma cos_2sigmam B
    delta_sigma(isnan(delta_sigma)) = 0;
    r = gather(b.*A.*(sigma - delta_sigma));
    clear sigma A delta_sigma
    %% Same Point Check
    r(samePoint) = 0;
    %% Calculate Azimuth if needed
    if nargout >= 2
        lambda(gather(isnan(lambda)) & gather(isEast)) = pi/2;
        lambda(gather(isnan(lambda)) & ~gather(isEast)) = -pi/2;
        az = rad2deg(atan2(cos(U2).*sin(lambda),cos(U1).*sin(U2)-sin(U1).*cos(U2).*cos(lambda)));
        clear U1 U2 lambda
        az = gather(zero22pi(az));
        az(samePoint) = 0;
    end
end

% clearvars -except az r
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for quick reply, I have tried a lot googling and reading the concept but unfortunately I am unable to understand as I am yet not able to create a conversion function –  Net Surgeon Sep 29 '11 at 9:52
    
well-- which path are you wanting to go, referenced by lat/lon purely, or by distance? –  hinklecw Sep 29 '11 at 18:55
    
i updated the answer with information that should help you. i may implement geodistance in java on my own, but if you dont want to wait i recommend you do it yourself. –  hinklecw Sep 29 '11 at 19:03
    
once you have a distance or latitude and longitude you are happy with. you can do something like this, figure out the top left and bottom right corners of the screen you care about, and then figure out pixels per meter, or pixels per degree, then multiply by meters or degrees and then you have your pixels value –  hinklecw Sep 29 '11 at 21:50
    
Thanks for detailed reply, most of the part just gone over my head, so right now I am trying to understand WGS84 and VRECKON algos and yes I must say while reading above algos it helped me with a basic conversion function which I will explain later, ok another question, is it required to implement such extensive algos(spherical) but we know that we have a very limited range, and curves of sphere may not effect alot? –  Net Surgeon Sep 30 '11 at 13:40
up vote 2 down vote accepted

OK finally I managed to write a conversion function which do the trick for me and works fine as I have tested on different location and with reference to centre point(M) all other points are displayed with perfect proportion.

public static POINT XY(double centerLatitude, double centerLongitude, double Latitude, double Longitude, double MetersPerPixel) {
    double rto = 1/MetersPerPixel;
    double dLAT = ((centerLatitude - Latitude)/ 0.00001) * rto;
    double dLNG = -1 * ((centerLongitude - Longitude) / 0.00001) * rto;
    int y = (int)Math.round(dLAT);
    int x = (int)Math.round(dLNG);
    POINT crd = new POINT(x, y );
    return crd;
}
share|improve this answer
    
what is the meter per pixel you are using ? –  fredcrs Feb 1 '13 at 18:10
    
I am getting all equal numbers for close points in the map –  fredcrs Feb 1 '13 at 19:48
    
It depends on zoom level, as i use this application while driving so i don't go in much detail, and hence my normal MetersPerPixel=100 Meter per pixel. As car moves very fast so no point in taking less than 100 meter (In my case :)) –  Net Surgeon Feb 4 '13 at 4:27
    
I would recommend use excel spread sheet and plot your value in above formula. what ever the x and y is mark them on some graph paper or any paper, plot minimum 3 points, then look at the result if its OK to you. 2 things are very important if you want to plot points arround M (the distance between M and the point we want to map matters a lot). if you want to plot point around M with the distance of 500M then you might play with MetersPerPixel, start from 100 and decrease it to 20 meters per pixel( means distance of 20m will be represented with 1 pixel). Must use excel to have exact idea. –  Net Surgeon Feb 4 '13 at 4:41

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