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In a programming language (Python, C#, etc) I need to determine how to calculate the angle between a line and the horizontal axis?

I think an image describes best what I want:

no words can describe this

Given (P1x,P1y) and (P2x,P2y) what is the best way to calculate this angle? The origin is in the topleft and only the positive quadrant is used.

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55  
The question is better than the people who closed it :) – Bitterblue Jan 7 '14 at 15:33
6  
This question should be reopened. – Danny Bullis May 16 '15 at 9:31
1  
Lol, looks like a group of rogue moderators are trying to close stack overflow one good question at a time. – Ninjaxor Aug 13 '15 at 18:25
    
This question might be a useful (because highly upvoted and therefore highly visible) target where other questions looking for atan2 could be duplicated to. Voting to reopen. – MvG Aug 27 '15 at 16:07
up vote 325 down vote accepted

First find the difference between the start point and the end point.

deltaY = P2_y - P1_y
deltaX = P2_x - P1_x

Then calculate the angle.

angleInDegrees = arctan(deltaY / deltaX) * 180 / PI

If your language includes an atan2 function it becomes the following instead:

angleInDegrees = atan2(deltaY, deltaX) * 180 / PI

An implementation in Python using radians (provided by Eric Leschinski, who edited my answer):

from math import *
def angle_trunc(a):
    while a < 0.0:
        a += pi * 2
    return a

def getAngleBetweenPoints(x_orig, y_orig, x_landmark, y_landmark):
    deltaY = y_landmark - y_orig
    deltaX = x_landmark - x_orig
    return angle_trunc(atan2(deltaY, deltaX))

angle = getAngleBetweenPoints(5, 2, 1,4)
assert angle >= 0, "angle must be >= 0"
angle = getAngleBetweenPoints(1, 1, 2, 1)
assert angle == 0, "expecting angle to be 0"
angle = getAngleBetweenPoints(2, 1, 1, 1)
assert abs(pi - angle) <= 0.01, "expecting angle to be pi, it is: " + str(angle)
angle = getAngleBetweenPoints(2, 1, 2, 3)
assert abs(angle - pi/2) <= 0.01, "expecting angle to be pi/2, it is: " + str(angle)
angle = getAngleBetweenPoints(2, 1, 2, 0)
assert abs(angle - (pi+pi/2)) <= 0.01, "expecting angle to be pi+pi/2, it is: " + str(angle)
angle = getAngleBetweenPoints(1, 1, 2, 2)
assert abs(angle - (pi/4)) <= 0.01, "expecting angle to be pi/4, it is: " + str(angle)
angle = getAngleBetweenPoints(-1, -1, -2, -2)
assert abs(angle - (pi+pi/4)) <= 0.01, "expecting angle to be pi+pi/4, it is: " + str(angle)
angle = getAngleBetweenPoints(-1, -1, -1, 2)
assert abs(angle - (pi/2)) <= 0.01, "expecting angle to be pi/2, it is: " + str(angle)

All tests pass. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_circle

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14  
Ahh, atan2 was the thing I sought. +1 and accepted. – orlp Sep 28 '11 at 16:37
25  
If you found this and you are using JAVASCRiPT it is very important to note that Math.sin and Math.cos take radians so you do not need to convert the result into degrees! So ignore the * 180 / PI bit. It took me 4 hours to find that out. :) – sidonaldson Oct 8 '13 at 21:26
3  
@akashg: 90 - angleInDegrees ? – jbaums Jun 10 '14 at 3:35
1  
Thanks @sidonaldson! It took me also some time until I saw your comment :) – Drala Nov 19 '14 at 13:57
2  
@sidonaldson It's more than just Javascript, it's C, C#, C++, Java etc. In fact I dare say that the majority of languages have their maths library working primarily with radians. I've yet to see a language that only supports degrees by default. – Pharap Dec 18 '14 at 0:54

Sorry, but I'm pretty sure Peter's answer is wrong. Note that the y axis goes down the page (common in graphics). As such the deltaY calculation has to be reversed, or you get the wrong answer.

Consider:

System.out.println (Math.toDegrees(Math.atan2(1,1)));
System.out.println (Math.toDegrees(Math.atan2(-1,1)));
System.out.println (Math.toDegrees(Math.atan2(1,-1)));
System.out.println (Math.toDegrees(Math.atan2(-1,-1)));

gives

45.0
-45.0
135.0
-135.0

So if in the example above, P1 is (1,1) and P2 is (2,2) [because Y increases down the page], the code above will give 45.0 degrees for the example shown, which is wrong. Change the order of the deltaY calculation and it works properly.

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3  
I reversed it as you suggested and my rotation was backwards. – DevilsAdvocate Oct 17 '12 at 5:17
7  
Would be good if you could display the correct way. – Hermann Ingjaldsson Jul 1 '13 at 13:21
1  
In my code I'm fix this with: double arc = Math.atan2(mouse.y - obj.getPy(), mouse.x - obj.getPx()); degrees = Math.toDegrees(arc); if (degrees < 0) degrees += 360; else if (degrees > 360) degrees -= 360; – MBecker Mar 26 '15 at 0:48

I have found a solution in Python that is working well !

from math import atan2,degrees

def GetAngleOfLineBetweenTwoPoints(p1, p2):
    return degrees(atan2(p2 - p1, 1))

print GetAngleOfLineBetweenTwoPoints(1,3)
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Based on reference "Peter O".. Here is the java version

private static final float angleBetweenPoints(PointF a, PointF b) {
float deltaY = b.y - a.y;
float deltaX = b.x - a.x;
return (float) (Math.atan2(deltaY, deltaX)); }
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