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I have this query:

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS tmp_table;
CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE tmp_table(id int primary key) 
IGNORE (
   SELECT user2role.userid AS userid
     FROM user2role 
    INNER JOIN users ON users.id=user2role.userid 
    INNER JOIN role ON role.roleid=user2role.roleid 
    WHERE role.parentrole like 'H1::H2::H3::H4::H5::%') 
UNION (
   SELECT groupid
     FROM groups
    WHERE groupid IN (2,3,4));

This query was originally written in MySQL and instead of DROP TABLE IF EXISTS it used IF NOT EXISTS. I changed that part, but I don't know what to do about the IGNORE.

First off, what is IGNORE doing?

I tried looking for PostgreSQL equivalents, but they all seem to involve complicated procedures. Do I have to write a procedure for this? And if I have to write one, what would it look like? Could I just emulate IGNORE using some PHP code instead? (The SQL queries are generated by PHP.)

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1 Answer 1

You would write like this in postgres.
IGNORE is irrelevant here, as the table has just been recreated and is guaranteed to be empty. And UNION guarantees there are no duplicate rows inserted.

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS tmp_table;

CREATE TEMP TABLE tmp_table(id int4 primary key);

INSERT INTO tmp_table
SELECT user2role.userid::int4 AS id
  FROM user2role 
  JOIN users ON users.id = user2role.userid 
  JOIN role ON role.roleid = user2role.roleid 
 WHERE role.parentrole like 'H1::H2::H3::H4::H5::%'
UNION
SELECT groupid::int4
  FROM groups
 WHERE groupid in (2,3,4);

If duplicates in the SELECT cannot occur, you might consider the faster UNION ALL instead of UNION. Otherwise you need UNION to eliminate possible dupes. Read here.
If your dataset is large you might consider creating the primary key after the INSERT. That's faster.

Read the mySQL docs on effects of IGNORE.


On revisiting the page I realized you mention IF NOT EXISTS in the original code. You don't say so, but that only makes sense if the original code created the table only if it didn't exist already, which introduces the possibility of it being not empty before the INSERT. In this case IGNORE is relevant and needs an equivalent in PostgreSQL.

So here is alternative answer for that interpretation of your question.

CREATE TEMP TABLE IF NOT EXISTS has been implemented in PostgreSQL 9.1.
For older version I posted a solution on SO recently.

CREATE TEMP TABLE IF NOT EXISTS tmp_table(id int4 primary key);

INSERT INTO tmp_table
SELECT x.id
  FROM (
    SELECT user2role.userid::int4 AS id
      FROM user2role 
      JOIN users ON users.id = user2role.userid 
      JOIN role ON role.roleid = user2role.roleid 
     WHERE role.parentrole like 'H1::H2::H3::H4::H5::%'
    UNION
    SELECT groupid::int4
      FROM groups
     WHERE groupid in (2,3,4)
        ) x
  LEFT JOIN tmp_table t USING (id)
 WHERE t.id IS NULL;

LEFT JOIN ... WHERE t.id IS NULL excludes any id that might already be present in tmp_table. UNION goes into a sub-select, so that clause needs only be applied once. Should be fastest.
More on LEFT JOIN here.

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Oh, so the the stuff following ignore is just inserted into the new temp table? In that case why use ignore instead of insert into? –  zermy Sep 28 '11 at 17:00
    
I would have to guess. It may have been useful in mySQL, but is not needed (and does not exist) in postgres. There are side-effect of the keyword IGNORE like treating duplicate-key-errors as just warning. But that cannot occur here, as UNION per definition eliminates duplicates. –  Erwin Brandstetter Sep 28 '11 at 17:12
    
Thanks a lot, 2 quick questions, why did you change int to int4 and Inner JOIN to JOIN (is it because Join is Inner by default, so it doesn't matter?)? –  zermy Sep 28 '11 at 17:50
    
INNER JOIN and JOIN are synonymous in postgres. I prefer the short version. Added the cast ::int4 to be sure, because the question does not tell us the type useridand groupid. If those are integer already, you can leave that out. –  Erwin Brandstetter Sep 28 '11 at 18:07
    
I rejected an edit, because this is correct: "If there cannot be duplicates in the SELECT, you might consider UNION ALL". Only if it is guaranteed that there are no duplicates to begin with, then you can make use of the faster UNION ALL. Else you have to use UNION to eliminate dupes. I clarified the text. –  Erwin Brandstetter Sep 28 '11 at 19:49

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