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I am trying to get to certain charcters in a file that is in UTF-16 format.

I know how many characters I want to skip. I am currently using the TextReader.ReadBlock command to read a temporary array of all of the characters I want to skip, but I believe that setting the position would be faster. I just do not how to determine the new position.

Any idea what would be the fastest way to skip to a position in a unicode file if you have how many characters that you want to skip?

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How big are your files and your skip blocks? –  Henk Holterman Sep 28 '11 at 17:52
    
They have gotton up to a 100 megabytes –  Nick Sep 28 '11 at 17:56
    
Short from the troubles of utf-16 encoding, you can't know how many cr/lf line end characters to skip without actually reading the file. –  Hans Passant Sep 28 '11 at 18:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's not so easy to skip a block, that requires relative positioning.

If you can calculate the begiining of the next block (offset from the start of the file) it is doable:

        int nextPos = ...;

        reader.DiscardBufferedData();
        reader.BaseStream.Position = nextPos;
        line = reader.ReadLine();

You may have to tweak your calculation because UTF-16 file can have a BOM (2 leading bytes).

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Considwring that this os UTF-16 and not UTF-8 (where character size can vary) you have 2 bytes per character. So to skip x characters you have to skip x*2 bytes.

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UTF-16 could also contain pseuo-pairs (4 byte/char). Very unlikely but still. And you will have to sync the TexReader and the Stream, tricky. –  Henk Holterman Sep 28 '11 at 17:51
    
That's only true if you ignore combining characters, surrogates, etc. –  Jim Mischel Sep 28 '11 at 17:52
    
@Henk: The surrogates, as much as I'm aware of, are splitted on pair of 2 characters 2 bytes each, in .NET. So they SHOULD "fit" into general rule. –  Tigran Sep 28 '11 at 18:01
    
Does not seem to be working for me. It works for the begining of the file but soon after that stops. –  Nick Sep 28 '11 at 18:25

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