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#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int score;
char grade;
cout << "Enter your score:" << endl;
cin >> score;
if (score >= 90)
    grade = 'a';
if (score >= 80)
    grade = 'b';
if (score >= 70)
    grade = 'c';
if (score >= 60)
    grade = 'd';
else 
    grade = 'f';
cout << grade << endl;
switch (grade) {
    case 'a':
        cout << "Good job" << endl;
        break;
    case 'c':
        cout << "Fair job" << endl;
        break;
    case 'f':
        cout << "Failure" << endl;
        break;
    default:
        cout << "invalid" << endl;
}
cin.get();
return 0;
  }

why is it giving me my default switch case when i enter 95 when i should be getting case a

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1  
Why are you converting the number to a letter and then the letter to a longer worded description? Skip the switch and print both in your first if (after you fix it of course). Over-complication is our worst curse, fight against it! –  Blindy Sep 28 '11 at 19:20
    
because case 'd': is missing did you notice which grade was being output? –  AJG85 Sep 28 '11 at 19:21
1  
did you checked the output of the grade before the switch start is it returns a –  punit Sep 28 '11 at 19:23
    
@Blindy probably because this is a homework assignment illustrating differences between nested if-else-if and switch cases. –  AJG85 Sep 28 '11 at 19:23
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9 Answers 9

You're missing a bunch of elses, or doing the comparisons in the wrong order.

95 is greater than 90, but it's also greater than 80, 70 and 60. So you'll get a 'd'.

(And you're not handling 'd' in your switch.)

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I believe you want

if (score >= 90)
    grade = 'a';
else if (score >= 80)
    grade = 'b';
else if (score >= 70)
    grade = 'c';
else if (score >= 60)
    grade = 'd';
else 
    grade = 'f';

What you have does not mutually exclude any but the last two cases, 60 and above and lower. Your code doesn't short circuit, it checks all of 1 through 5.

if (score >= 90) // 1.
    grade = 'a';

if (score >= 80) // 2.
    grade = 'b';

if (score >= 70) // 4.
    grade = 'c';

if (score >= 60) // 5.
    grade = 'd';
else 
    grade = 'f';
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I think you want to use 'else if', it is falling down to the last if "score >= 60" which is true, and grade then equals "d", which produces the default case in your switch statement.

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You have specified it such that your 95 satisfies all the cases: 95 is bigger than 90, but also bigger than 80 and than 70 etc...

In this case, the last one wins.

You can solve it by either using elses, or by wrapping it in a function and returning as soon as you know the grade you need:

char grade( int score ){
   if( score >= 90 ) return 'a';
   if( score >= 80 ) return 'b';
   ...
}
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It's because of your if statements up top. you should be using else ifs instead of individual ifs. Whats happening is your if for 90 is following through, and then so are all the others. Your letter a is essentially being overwritten because 95 is >= to all of the other coniditons. Using an else if will break the rest of the checks when a true one is found.

if (score >= 90)
    grade = 'a';
else if (score >= 80)
    grade = 'b';
else if (score >= 70)
    grade = 'c';
else if (score >= 60)
    grade = 'd';
else
    grade = 'f';
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Because all score comparisons are not combined with if/else if conditions. They are independent if statements. Thus grade gets overwritten for 95.

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The if branches are ordered wrong (or you need to provide else branches like so:)

See it live here: http://ideone.com/2uSZT

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int score;
    char grade;
    cout << "Enter your score:" << endl;
    cin >> score;
    if (score >= 90)
        grade = 'a';
    else if (score >= 80)
        grade = 'b';
    else if (score >= 70)
        grade = 'c';
    else if (score >= 60)
        grade = 'd';
    else
        grade = 'f';

    cout << grade << endl;
    switch (grade)
    {
    case 'a':
        cout << "Good job" << endl;
        break;
    case 'c':
        cout << "Fair job" << endl;
        break;
    case 'f':
        cout << "Failure" << endl;
        break;
    default:
        cout << "invalid" << endl;
    }
    cin.get();
    return 0;
}
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@mat: you must have flashed on my initial too-quick response? I thought I ninja'd it quick enough :) –  sehe Sep 28 '11 at 19:39
    
yep, saw your answer pop up while I was writing mine. Got confused a bit by it too :) –  Mat Sep 28 '11 at 19:43
    
@Mat: see, I know that it is good for something that I make it a point to disregard these popups. The only time it bites me is when I'm finally ready to press 'Submit' and it turns out that the question got deleted –  sehe Sep 28 '11 at 19:57
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you need to improve your if conditions, you are checking score >= no. the input 95 execute all the if statements and the last executed statement was the d now in your switch statement case d is not present so it's executes the default one.

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You've gotten some answers already, but I think I'll suggest a slightly different possibility gets rid of most of the control flow and substitutes a bit of math:

char grades[] = "00000012344";

char *messages[] = {
    "Excellent Job",
    "Good job",
    "Average job",
    "Mediocre Job",
    "Failure"
};

if (score < 0 || score > 100)
    std::cout << "Invalid score";
else {
    int grade = grades[score/10];
    std::cout << messages[grade];
}

So, we use score/10 to turn scores of 0-100 to 0-10. We then look up the appropriate grade for a score, with f=0, d=1, c=2, b=3 and a=4. We use that to select and print out the appropriate message. I've added messages (that may or may not be quite what you want) for the letters you skipped.

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