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I want to have a datetime string from the date with milliseconds. This code is typical for me and I'm eager to learn how to shorten it.

from datetime import datetime

timeformatted= str(datetime.utcnow())
semiformatted= timeformatted.replace("-","")
almostformatted= semiformatted.replace(":","")
formatted=almostformatted.replace(".","")
withspacegoaway=formatted.replace(" ","")
formattedstripped=withspacegoaway.strip()
print formattedstripped
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1  
2  
Please write a title that describes your problem and try to keep your question clear and to the point. – agf Sep 28 '11 at 19:34
up vote 51 down vote accepted

The OP asked for a string with milliseconds (3 decimal places behind seconds). To get milliseconds, use this instead:

from datetime import datetime

print datetime.utcnow().strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S.%f')[:-3]

>>>> OUTPUT >>>>
2013-08-23 10:18:32.926
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1  
The only correct answer. Unless asker meant microseconds – rofrol Sep 18 '13 at 16:20
    
To be precise, 2013-08-23 10:18:32.926 is the output of print datetime.utcnow().strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S.%f')[:-3] . – Jaan May 12 '15 at 18:12
    
@Jaan, good catch. I fixed my answer accordingly – Jeremy - DeerAngel-org May 14 '15 at 15:02
1  
Note, if you want to use import datetime instead of from datetime import datetime, you'll have to use this: datetime.datetime.utcnow().strftime("%H:%M:%S.%f") – Luc Sep 16 '15 at 11:01
1  
In case microseconds are 0, in windows 2.7 implementation microseconds are not printed out so it trims seconds :( – cabbi Nov 9 '15 at 15:37
print datetime.utcnow().strftime('%Y%m%d%H%M%S%f')

http://docs.python.org/library/datetime.html#strftime-strptime-behavior

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7  
FYI, this prints microseconds as the last 6 digits. Add [:-3] to the end to drop the last 3 digits so that it is only displaying milliseconds. – Mark Lakata Jan 2 '14 at 21:40
    
microseconds can be less than 6 digits, so [:-3] is printing out wrong milliseconds – cabbi Nov 9 '15 at 15:26

I assume you mean you're looking for something that is faster than datetime.datetime.strftime(), and are essentially stripping the non-alpha characters from a utc timestamp.

You're approach is marginally faster, and I think you can speed things up even more by slicing the string:

>>> import timeit
>>> t=timeit.Timer('datetime.utcnow().strftime("%Y%m%d%H%M%S%f")','''
... from datetime import datetime''')
>>> t.timeit(number=10000000)
116.15451288223267

>>> def replaceutc(s):
...     return s\
...         .replace('-','') \
...         .replace(':','') \
...         .replace('.','') \
...         .replace(' ','') \
...         .strip()
... 
>>> t=timeit.Timer('replaceutc(str(datetime.datetime.utcnow()))','''
... from __main__ import replaceutc
... import datetime''')
>>> t.timeit(number=10000000)
77.96774983406067

>>> def sliceutc(s):
...     return s[:4] + s[5:7] + s[8:10] + s[11:13] + s[14:16] + s[17:19] + s[20:]
... 
>>> t=timeit.Timer('sliceutc(str(datetime.utcnow()))','''
... from __main__ import sliceutc
... from datetime import datetime''')
>>> t.timeit(number=10000000)
62.378515005111694
share|improve this answer
    
@oxtopus Good work. Personally, I don't use timeit anymore for simple measuring of time. It's strange that the ratios of times are different with your code: 1 - 0.67 - 0.53 and with mine: 1 - 0.35 - 0.20 , for the methods strftime - replace - slicing – eyquem Sep 28 '11 at 21:47
    
Maybe something to do with the str(datetime.datetime.utcnow()) being called in each iteration of the test vs setting it once? – Austin Marshall Sep 28 '11 at 22:10
from datetime import datetime
from time import clock

t = datetime.utcnow()
print 't == %s    %s\n\n' % (t,type(t))

n = 100000

te = clock()
for i in xrange(1):
    t_stripped = t.strftime('%Y%m%d%H%M%S%f')
print clock()-te
print t_stripped," t.strftime('%Y%m%d%H%M%S%f')"

print

te = clock()
for i in xrange(1):
    t_stripped = str(t).replace('-','').replace(':','').replace('.','').replace(' ','')
print clock()-te
print t_stripped," str(t).replace('-','').replace(':','').replace('.','').replace(' ','')"

print

te = clock()
for i in xrange(n):
    t_stripped = str(t).translate(None,' -:.')
print clock()-te
print t_stripped," str(t).translate(None,' -:.')"

print

te = clock()
for i in xrange(n):
    s = str(t)
    t_stripped = s[:4] + s[5:7] + s[8:10] + s[11:13] + s[14:16] + s[17:19] + s[20:] 
print clock()-te
print t_stripped," s[:4] + s[5:7] + s[8:10] + s[11:13] + s[14:16] + s[17:19] + s[20:] "

result

t == 2011-09-28 21:31:45.562000    <type 'datetime.datetime'>


3.33410112179
20110928212155046000  t.strftime('%Y%m%d%H%M%S%f')

1.17067364707
20110928212130453000 str(t).replace('-','').replace(':','').replace('.','').replace(' ','')

0.658806915404
20110928212130453000 str(t).translate(None,' -:.')

0.645189262881
20110928212130453000 s[:4] + s[5:7] + s[8:10] + s[11:13] + s[14:16] + s[17:19] + s[20:]

Use of translate() and slicing method run in same time
translate() presents the advantage to be usable in one line

Comparing the times on the basis of the first one:

1.000 * t.strftime('%Y%m%d%H%M%S%f')

0.351 * str(t).replace('-','').replace(':','').replace('.','').replace(' ','')

0.198 * str(t).translate(None,' -:.')

0.194 * s[:4] + s[5:7] + s[8:10] + s[11:13] + s[14:16] + s[17:19] + s[20:]

share|improve this answer
    
Nice! That is indeed cleaner without sacrificing performance. str.translate() actually faster in my testing. – Austin Marshall Sep 28 '11 at 21:47

Probably like this :

import datetime
now = datetime.datetime.now()
now.strftime('%Y/%m/%d %H:%m:%S.%f')[:-3]  
# [:-3] => Removing the 3 last characters as %f is for microsecs.
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@Cabbi raised the issue that on some systems, the microseconds format %f may give "0", so it's not portable to simply chop off the last three characters.

The following code carefully formats a timestamp with milliseconds:

from datetime import datetime
(dt, micro) = datetime.utcnow().strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S.%f').split('.')
dt = "%s.%03d" % (dt, int(micro) / 1000)
print dt

Example Output:

2016-02-26 04:37:53.133

To get the exact output that the OP wanted, we have to strip punctuation characters:

from datetime import datetime
(dt, micro) = datetime.utcnow().strftime('%Y%m%d%H%M%S.%f').split('.')
dt = "%s%03d" % (dt, int(micro) / 1000)
print dt

Example Output:

20160226043839901
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What I'am actually doing is this: print '%s.%03d'%(dt.strftime("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S"), int(dt.microsecond/1000)) – cabbi Mar 8 at 8:35

Just use datetime.datetime.strftime() with an appropriate format string.

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thanx...i knew that there was somewhere this opportunity for the datetime object...but i have this sort of code very often...and i wonder if i can shorten it... – Jurudocs Sep 28 '11 at 19:36

I dealt with the same problem but in my case it was important that the millisecond was rounded and not truncated

from datetime import datetime, timedelta

def strftime_ms(datetime_obj):
    y,m,d,H,M,S = datetime_obj.timetuple()[:6]
    ms = timedelta(microseconds = round(datetime_obj.microsecond/1000.0)*1000)
    ms_date = datetime(y,m,d,H,M,S) + ms
    return ms_date.strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S.%f')[:-3]
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