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I am looking to return some JSON across domains and I understand that the way to do this is through JSONP rather than pure JSON. I am using ASP.net MVC so I was thinking about just extending the JSONResult type and then extendig Controller so that it also implemented a Jsonp method. Is this the best way to go about it or is there a built in ActionResult which might be better?

Edit: I went ahead and did that. Just for reference sake I added a new result:

public class JsonpResult : System.Web.Mvc.JsonResult
    {
        public override void ExecuteResult(ControllerContext context)
        {
            if (context == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentNullException("context");
            }

            HttpResponseBase response = context.HttpContext.Response;

            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(ContentType))
            {
                response.ContentType = ContentType;
            }
            else
            {
                response.ContentType = "application/javascript";
            }
            if (ContentEncoding != null)
            {
                response.ContentEncoding = ContentEncoding;
            }
            if (Data != null)
            {
                // The JavaScriptSerializer type was marked as obsolete prior to .NET Framework 3.5 SP1
#pragma warning disable 0618
                HttpRequestBase request = context.HttpContext.Request;

                JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
                response.Write(request.Params["jsoncallback"] + "(" + serializer.Serialize(Data) + ")");
#pragma warning restore 0618
            }
        }
    }

and also a couple of methods to a superclass of all my controllers:

protected internal JsonpResult Jsonp(object data)
        {
            return Jsonp(data, null /* contentType */);
        }

        protected internal JsonpResult Jsonp(object data, string contentType)
        {
            return Jsonp(data, contentType, null);
        }

        protected internal virtual JsonpResult Jsonp(object data, string contentType, Encoding contentEncoding)
        {
            return new JsonpResult
            {
                Data = data,
                ContentType = contentType,
                ContentEncoding = contentEncoding
            };
        }

Works like a charm.

share|improve this question
1  
I just made a blog post about this exact thing and used essentially the same approach as you have outlined above except for adding a little action filter on top to make enabling JSONP on existing controller implementations a little less painful. You can read all about it here: > http://blogorama.nerdworks.in/entry-EnablingJSONPcallsonASPNETMVC.aspx –  Raj Oct 19 '09 at 21:53
    
Thanks! Just implemented this in our project! :) –  Adam Kahtava Feb 1 '10 at 23:47
2  
Nice! But JSONP should be served as application/javascript stackoverflow.com/questions/111302/… –  Mauricio Scheffer Jun 7 '11 at 15:17
1  
+1 Cited blog is epic win. –  Chris Marisic Dec 2 '11 at 19:22
1  
This shows the issue with posting nothing more than a link as the answer. Posting at least the bare minimum in the answer's body increases the value of the StackOverflow as blogs get moved and abandoned. –  Robert Kaucher Apr 8 '13 at 15:49

5 Answers 5

Rather than subclassing my controllers with Jsonp() methods, I went the extension method route as it feels a touch cleaner to me. The nice thing about the JsonpResult is that you can test it exactly the same way you would a JsonResult.

I did:

public static class JsonResultExtensions
{
    public static JsonpResult ToJsonp(this JsonResult json)
    {
        return new JsonpResult { ContentEncoding = json.ContentEncoding, ContentType = json.ContentType, Data = json.Data, JsonRequestBehavior = json.JsonRequestBehavior};
    }
}

This way you don't have to worry about creating all the different Jsonp() overloads, just convert your JsonResult to a Jsonp one.

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1  
What's the JsonpResult class? –  DiwasP8 Sep 5 '13 at 2:37
    
Can you give an example of a call to this? –  Josh Noe Sep 24 '13 at 15:36
1  
To the other commenters, to be clear, mendicant is building off of the code from the OP. –  ruffin Nov 8 '13 at 14:37

Ranju's blog post (aka "This blog post I found") is excellent, and reading it will allow you to further the solution below so that your controller can handle same-domain JSON and cross-domain JSONP requests elegantly in the same controller action without additional code [in the action].

Regardless, for the "give me the code" types, here it is, in case the blog disappears again.

In your controller (this snippet is new/non-blog code):

[AllowCrossSiteJson]
public ActionResult JsonpTime(string callback)
{
    string msg = DateTime.UtcNow.ToString("o");
    return new JsonpResult
    {
        Data = (new
        {
            time = msg
        })
    };
}

JsonpResult found on this excellent blog post:

/// <summary>
/// Renders result as JSON and also wraps the JSON in a call
/// to the callback function specified in "JsonpResult.Callback".
/// http://blogorama.nerdworks.in/entry-EnablingJSONPcallsonASPNETMVC.aspx
/// </summary>
public class JsonpResult : JsonResult
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or sets the javascript callback function that is
    /// to be invoked in the resulting script output.
    /// </summary>
    /// <value>The callback function name.</value>
    public string Callback { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Enables processing of the result of an action method by a
    /// custom type that inherits from <see cref="T:System.Web.Mvc.ActionResult"/>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="context">The context within which the
    /// result is executed.</param>
    public override void ExecuteResult(ControllerContext context)
    {
        if (context == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("context");

        HttpResponseBase response = context.HttpContext.Response;
        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(ContentType))
            response.ContentType = ContentType;
        else
            response.ContentType = "application/javascript";

        if (ContentEncoding != null)
            response.ContentEncoding = ContentEncoding;

        if (Callback == null || Callback.Length == 0)
            Callback = context.HttpContext.Request.QueryString["callback"];

        if (Data != null)
        {
            // The JavaScriptSerializer type was marked as obsolete
            // prior to .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 
#pragma warning disable 0618
            JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
            string ser = serializer.Serialize(Data);
            response.Write(Callback + "(" + ser + ");");
#pragma warning restore 0618
        }
    }
}

Note: Following up on the comments to the OP by @Ranju and others, I figured it was worth posting the "bare minimum" functional code from Ranju's blog post as a community wiki. Though it's safe to say that Ranju added the above and other code on his blog to be used freely, I'm not going to copy his words here.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @ruffin! Was meaning to do this one of these days. Thanks for getting it done! :) –  Raj Sep 15 '14 at 20:18

Here is a simple solution, if you don't want to define an action filter

Client side code using jQuery:

  $.ajax("http://www.myserver.com/Home/JsonpCall", { dataType: "jsonp" }).done(function (result) {});

MVC controller action. Retuerns content result with JavaScript code executing callback function provided with query string. Also sets JavaScript MIME type for response.

 public ContentResult JsonpCall(string callback)
 {
      return Content(String.Format("{0}({1});",
          callback, 
          new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(new { a = 1 })),    
          "application/javascript");
 }
share|improve this answer

The referenced articles by stimms and ranju v were both very useful and made the situation clear.

However, I was left scratching my head about using extensions, sub-classing in context of the MVC code I had found online.

There was two key points that caught me out:

  1. The code I had derived from ActionResult, but in ExecuteResult there was some code to return either XML or JSON.
  2. I had then created a Generics based ActionResult, to ensure the same ExecuteResults was used independant of the type of data I returned.

So, combining the two - I did not need further extensions or sub-classing to add the mechanism to return JSONP, simply change my existing ExecuteResults.

What had confused me is that really I was looking for a way to derive or extend JsonResult, without re-coding the ExecuteResult. As JSONP is effectively a JSON string with prefix & suffix it seemed a waste. However the underling ExecuteResult uses respone.write - so the safest way of changing is to re-code ExecuteResults as handily provided by various postings!

I can post some code if that would be useful, but there is quite a lot of code in this thread already.

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the solution above is a good way of working but it should be extendend with a new type of result instead of having a method that returns a JsonResult you should write methods that return your own result types

public JsonPResult testMethod() {
    // use the other guys code to write a method that returns something
}

public class JsonPResult : JsonResult
{
    public FileUploadJsonResult(JsonResult data) {
        this.Data = data;
    }      

    public override void ExecuteResult(ControllerContext context)
    {
        this.ContentType = "text/html";
        context.HttpContext.Response.Write("<textarea>");
        base.ExecuteResult(context);
        context.HttpContext.Response.Write("</textarea>");
    }
}
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