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I have a before_filter hook in my main app's application controller that does something like: (It doesn't just put a link in the flash, there is a message, but it isn't relevant to the question, it just accesses the route in the method)

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  before_filter :set_link

  def set_link
    flash[:notice] = items_path
  end
end

This works fine for the app, however when I go into the controllers for an engine I made I get the exception

No route matches {:controller=>"items", :action=>"index"}

I understand that when in the engine, the routes helpers are for the engine unless prefixed with main_app

So changing the method in the application controller to

  def set_link
    flash[:notice] = main_app.items_path
  end

Gets rid of the exception but I really don't want to have to do that. Is there another solution to getting the engine to recognize the main_app routes?

EDIT:

This also happens if the application layout calls path helpers. So if the engine is designed to integrated into the main_app's layout then this issue will crop there up too.

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What's wrong with main_app? Besides that, why you're introducing a dependency in your engine from the main app, in this way your engine depends on items_path being defined in every app which uses it. This is not a good practice, usually you should use only main_app.root_path, or some other well known routes (for instance if your using devise the sign_in_path). –  Fabio Sep 28 '11 at 22:17
    
items_path would be defined in the main app which is already built. And I want to have the engine mounted somewhere but integrated into the current app's layout. The engine itself never references items_path at all. I just want the views generated by the engine to get put in the body of the application layout. However, the application layout needs to access to the main_app's routes –  Olives Sep 28 '11 at 22:32
    
This comes from the need to have the engine and the application share the same layout. That way when a user goes from a page on the main app, to a page on the engine, there is no visible difference between the layout. –  Olives Sep 28 '11 at 22:57
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4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Mountable engines are designed to work like this, that is isolate the main app routes and the engine routes.

If you want the two sets of routes to be merged, you can use a non-isolated engine. The first step is removing the isolated_namespace method call in your engine definition:

module MyEngine
  class Engine < Rails::Engine
    isolate_namespace MyEngine # remove this line
  end
end

The second step is to convert your routes in my_engine/config/routes.rb, you should go from this:

MyEngine::Engine.routes.draw do
  # stuff that routes things
end

to this:

Rails.application.routes.draw do
  # stuff that routes things
end

and remove the mount method call in your application's routes:

App::Application.routes.draw do
  mount MyEngine::Engine => "/engine" # remove this line
end

The main advantages of doing it this way would be:

  1. No need to monkey-patch rails. I know devise does this, but this could be a leftover from the days when engines didn't exist in rails.

  2. No need to mount the engine in the application routes. On the other hand, this could backfire if you'd like to control more precisely the insertion point as all you engine routes would be called after (or before, I don't have the answer to this question) your main routes.

If you're looking for documentation on engines, the rails docs for the Engine class are a pretty good starting point. I'd strongly recommend that you read them (in case you haven't yet) if you're interested in the subject.

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Oh man thanks, I was pulling my hair out... –  M.G.Palmer Nov 29 '12 at 15:37
    
you forgot to note, if you remove isolated_namespace you might expose yourself to some name conflicts with the main app or other gems (example: helpers) –  montrealmike Apr 21 '13 at 2:23
    
Can't upvote it more! –  Nerve Aug 28 '13 at 18:16
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I figured out how to do this. The problems lies within the isolated namespace. In order to integrate the engine with the app and share the same layout (which may have path helpers from the main app) I did this:

Firstly I removed config/routes.rb from the engine

Then I removed the isolate_namespace from the engine class

module MyEngine
   class Engine < Rails::Engine
-    isolate_namespace MyEngine
   end
 end
end

I added a file that was loaded in the engine:

module ActionDispatch::Routing
  class Mapper
    def mount_my_engine_at(mount_location)
      scope mount_location do
        #Declare all your routes here
      end
    end
  end
end

Finally, in the main app's config/routes.rb instead of 'mount'ing the engine, you can call your method

mount_my_engine_at "mount_location"

This will basically 'mount' your engine as part of the main app instead of being isolated from it. It is similar to how Devise does it too.

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The easiest way is to draw the routes in both the main app, and the engine, so that they are accessible to both:

[MyEngine::Engine, App::Application].each do |app|
  app.routes.draw do
    # Declare all your routes here
  end
end
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You can keep the isolate_namespace. In your engine routes.rb

MyEngine::Engine.routes.draw do
  ...
  root to: "something#index"
end

Rails.application.routes.draw do
  get "something", to: "my_engine/something#index"
end

And then in the main app routes.rb

Rails.application.routes.draw do

  mount MyEngine::Engine => "/anything_you_want"

  root to: "main#index"
end

This way you can choose what routes you want to expose (and which you do not)

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