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Save me from raptor death - is there any better way to handle this kind of structure?

while(condition) {
    $this->phase1();
    $this->phase2();
    $this->phase3();
    $this->phase4();
}

Throughout either one of those methods, the condition could be met. IMMEDIATELY after the condition is met, the loop MUST exit. If I could call break; inside of phase2(); for example, I wouldn't need a goto statement (but of course, that would throw an error).

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7  
raptor death reference: xkcd.com/292 –  amosrivera Sep 28 '11 at 20:24
    
Catchy title. :-) –  Herbert Sep 28 '11 at 20:27
    
Does phase1 also stop running halfway through if condition turns to false? –  corsiKa Sep 28 '11 at 20:39
    
Your description suggests to me that you should have while(!conditiion){...} –  vascowhite Sep 28 '11 at 20:41
    
Jump up and down on one arm while licking your big toe and sucking your thumb. I don't know what's more ridiculous: avoiding goto for the sake of avoiding goto or jumping through hoops to do so. It seems your best bet is to re-examine your algorithm. –  Herbert Sep 28 '11 at 20:49

8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Return a boolean to execute each stage until successful.

while (condition) {
    if ($this->phase1() || $this->phase2() || $this->phase3() || $this->phase4()) {
        // Success!
    }
}
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What if the condition is met in the middle of phase1 and you don't want to wait until the function exits? –  Chris G. Sep 28 '11 at 20:31
3  
This method assumes each phase is an atomic action with a single success/failure test. If you've got multiple cases inside a phase where could reach a successful state, it's likely that the code as a whole is just structured poorly. –  Brad Koch Sep 28 '11 at 20:34
2  
@Chris You can also simply return true; from a phase the moment the condition is met. –  Brad Koch Sep 28 '11 at 20:38
1  
It's hard to make a good judgement on structure without seeing the actual code, but that concern shouldn't be a big deal if every function truly handles an atomic operation. You just check for victory every time the score is incremented, which should only be once per action. –  Brad Koch Sep 28 '11 at 20:44
1  
If you use this pattern within each phase, you can return control from that phase pretty quickly. Note that if you are exiting when you hit the score cap, then it might not matter if you wind up calculating a few extra moves or whatever: just report the cap. Or call the extra points OVERKILL. –  horatio Sep 28 '11 at 21:22

Return a boolean from the different phases. I would return false if it didn't succeed, then check for that and break.

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I would probably have to add ~50 if statement chains to my code if I followed your advice. The condition can be met many different ways and this loop must exit IMMEDIATELY (read: AS SOON AS the condition is met) –  Chris G. Sep 28 '11 at 20:28
8  
then i say you have a bigger design problem. –  Daniel A. White Sep 28 '11 at 20:30
    
I'm not sure how else to structure it. This is a classic Game Loop problem, I would imagine. The player may win at any time, you don't want to wait for their turn to finish to display "You win!". You want it to display immediately! –  Chris G. Sep 28 '11 at 20:32
2  
Does it matter in PHP? The user doesn't get immediate feedback either way: they have to wait until the web server sends its response etc. –  Richard JP Le Guen Sep 28 '11 at 20:36
    
Sure it matters in PHP. I'm simulating a turn-based game. The results of the simulation are displayed after the game is over. I'm trying to display "The game is over." as soon as the win condition is met. –  Chris G. Sep 28 '11 at 20:41

Or you could use the State pattern!

In summary, instead of having a goto statement, change the internal state of $this such that methods phase1, phase2, phase3 and phase4 have no effect and are empty functions. Since they will be empty functions, you'll fly right through 'em and exit the loop!

You'll probably also need a pinch of events or the Observer pattern, to know when to change state.

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I feel like an observer pattern is what I'm looking for here. Each time the condition variable is changed, it could notify a game_won?() function which checks to see if the game is won. Then how would I break out of the game loop? –  Chris G. Sep 28 '11 at 20:44

Throw an exception... sounds exceptional...

try {
    while(condition) {
        $this->phase1();
        $this->phase2();
        $this->phase3();
        $this->phase4();
    }
} catch (Exception $e) { }
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it depends. @chris - ask yourself "is it worth the overhead?". –  Daniel A. White Sep 28 '11 at 20:27
1  
This could work, but it's the condition being met isn't strictly an ERROR. It's just a condition being met. Is error handling still a good approach? –  Chris G. Sep 28 '11 at 20:29
2  
As my friend Dan juuust said, "THOU SHALT NOT USE EXCEPTIONS FOR CONTROL FLOW!", but hey, I don't know why you need to jump out of this execution. Maybe not, when I read it, it sounded more dire... –  Steve Sep 28 '11 at 20:32
    
Honestly, exceptions are very similar to a GOTO when used for control flow. But, hey, if you need it, and you need it fast, there you go. Everyone knows exceptions and what to look for, but GOTO, man that is low. It is good to know what you sacrifice, but then you get to make the decision. –  Steve Sep 28 '11 at 20:39

How about wrapping each of the phases in an if:

while(condition)
{
  if(condition)
  {
    $this->phase1();
  }

  if(condition)
  {
    $this->phase2();
  }

  if(condition)
  {
    $this->phase3();
  }

  if(condition)
  {
    $this->phase4();
  }
}

Of course, this could probably be made more compact with a bit of planning and a loop.

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Of course I could do that. I could also wrap every other condition meeting event in an if statement as well. Thats a lot of if statements, yo. –  Chris G. Sep 28 '11 at 20:40

One way might be to use if() statements to check for a return value from each phase*() and break the while loop.

Something like this:

while (condition)   {
    if ($this->phase1())   { break; }
}
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Please don't use a goto statement, think to the coder who will herit your code base

if your condition it's not too much of overhead, you could

while(*condition*){
    $this->phase1();
    if (*condition*){
       $this->phase2();
    }

    ...

} 
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$phases=array('phase1','phase2','phase3','phase4');
foreach($phases as $phase){
    $this->$phase();
    if(condition)break;
}

Also , you can use exceptions if you want to break out from inside of the function.

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