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object of type A and Is there a way to programatically wrap a class object?

Given

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        ## ..

    def f0(self, a):
        ## ...

    def f1(self, a, b):
        ## ..

I want another class that wraps an A, such as

class B(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = A()

    def f0(self,a):
        try:
            a.f0(a)
        except (Exception),ex:
            ## ...

    def f1(self, a, b):
        try:
            a.f1(a,b)
        except (Exception),ex:
            ## ...

Is there a way to do create B.f0 & B.f1 by reflection/inspection of class A?

share|improve this question
2  
Yes, using class decorators. –  Rafe Kettler Sep 28 '11 at 20:32
1  
but, for my this look a bit like inheritance, is it that you are looking for or is there a specific usage hidden behind your problem? –  aweis Sep 28 '11 at 20:34
2  
A class decorator or (for Python 2.x) a metaclass will let you inspect the dictionary of B while it's being "compiled", and do things like replace method definitions in it with wrappers. –  millimoose Sep 28 '11 at 20:37
    
You haven't really given enough info for an answer. Does B wrap every accessed attribute of A in the same construct? If not, what attributes does it wrap? Every callable? Every instance method? –  agf Sep 28 '11 at 20:48

3 Answers 3

If you want to create class B by calling a function on a predefined class A, you can simply do B = wrap_class(A) with a function wrap_class that looks like this:

import copy

def wrap_class(cls):
    'Wraps a class so that exceptions in its methods are caught.'
    # The copy is necessary so that mutable class attributes are not
    # shared between the old class cls and the new class:
    new_cls = copy.deepcopy(cls)
    # vars() is used instead of dir() so that the attributes of base classes
    # are not modified, but one might want to use dir() instead:
    for (attr_name, value) in vars(cls).items():
        if isinstance(value, types.FunctionType):
            setattr(new_cls, attr_name, func_wrapper(value))
    return new_cls

B = wrap_class(A)

As Jürgen pointed out, this creates a copy of the class; this is only needed, however, if you really want to keep your original class A around (like suggested in the original question). If you don't care about A, you can simply decorate it with a wrapper that does not perform any copy, like so:

def wrap_class(cls):
    'Wraps a class so that exceptions in its methods are caught.'
    # vars() is used instead of dir() so that the attributes of base classes
    # are not modified, but one might want to use dir() instead:
    for (attr_name, value) in vars(cls).items():
        if isinstance(value, types.FunctionType):
            setattr(cls, attr_name, func_wrapper(value))
    return cls

@wrap_class
class A(object):
    …  # Original A class, with methods that are not wrapped with exception catching

The decorated class A catches exceptions.

The metaclass version is heavier, but its principle is similar:

import types

def func_wrapper(f):

    'Returns a version of function f that prints an error message if an exception is raised.'

    def wrapped_f(*args, **kwargs):
        try:
            return f(*args, **kwargs)
        except Exception, ex:
            print "Function", f, "raised", ex

    return wrapped_f

class ExceptionCatcher(type):

    'Metaclass that wraps methods with func_wrapper().'

    def __new__(meta, cname, bases, cdict):
        # cdict contains the attributes of class cname:
        for (attr_name, value) in cdict.items():
            if isinstance(value, types.FunctionType):  # Various attribute types can be wrapped differently
                cdict[attr_name] = func_wrapper(value)
        return super(meta, ExceptionCatcher).__new__(meta, cname, bases, cdict)

class B(object):

    __metaclass__ = ExceptionCatcher  # ExceptionCatcher will be used for creating class A

    class_attr = 42  # Will not be wrapped

    def __init__(self):
        pass

    def f0(self, a):
        return a*10

    def f1(self, a, b):
        1/0  # Raises a division by zero exception!

# Test:
b = B()
print b.f0(3.14)
print b.class_attr
print b.f1(2, 3)

This prints:

31.4
42
Function <function f1 at 0x107812d70> raised integer division or modulo by zero
None

What you want to do is in fact typically done by a metaclass, which is a class whose instances are a class: this is a way of building the B class dynamically based on its parsed Python code (the code for class A, in the question). More information on this can be found in the nice, short description of metaclasses given in Chris's Wiki (in part 1 and parts 2-4).

share|improve this answer
    
I think if this is all you're doing, might as well do it in the __init__ of a class decorator / wrapper like in the other answer. No need to introduce a metaclass. –  agf Sep 28 '11 at 20:52
    
However this does not wrap an A instance per se. If he gets self.a from an external source he may not want to reimplement A's methods in B. –  Jürgen Strobel Sep 28 '11 at 21:19
    
Ok now wrap_class does delegation. It would be simpler not having it create (deep copy) a new class, but just decorate it, using @wrap_class / class B(object) ... –  Jürgen Strobel Sep 28 '11 at 21:26
    
@agf: right. I put my wrap_class() function at the beginning of the answer, and the heavier metaclass approach is now at the end. –  EOL Sep 28 '11 at 21:31
    
One more niggling point with decorator syntax: of course you can say @wrap_class / class B(A): ... to avoid deep_copy and have a new (derived) class, my previous comment was sloppy in that regard. –  Jürgen Strobel Sep 29 '11 at 10:16

Meta classes are an option, but generally hard to understand. As is too much reflection if not needed in simple cases, because it is easy to catch too many (internal) functions. If the wrapped functions are a stable known set, and B might gain other functions, you can delegate explicitly function by function and still keep your error handling code in one place:

class B(object):

    def __init__(self):
        a = A()
        self.f0 = errorHandler(a.f0)  
        self.f1 = errorHandler(a.f1)

You might do the assignments in a loop if they are many, using getattr/setattr.

The errorhandler function will need to return a function which wraps its argument with error handling code.

def errorHandler(f):
    def wrapped(*args, **kw):
        try:
            return f(*args, **kw)
        except:
            # log or something
    return wrapped

You can also use errorhandler as decorator on new functions not delegating to the A instance.

def B(A):
    ...
    @errorHandler
    def f_new(self):
        ...

This solution keeps B simple and it is quite explicit what's going on.

share|improve this answer

You could try it old-school with __getattr__:

class B(object):
  def __init__(self):
    self.a = A()
  def __getattr__(self, name):
    a_method = getattr(a, name, None)
    if not callable(a_method):
      raise AttributeError("Unknown attribute %r" % name)
    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
      try:
        return a_method(*args, **kwargs)
      except Exception, ex:
        # ...
    return wrapper

Or with updating B's dict:

class B(object):
  def __init__(self):
    a = A()
    for attr_name in dir(a):
      attr = getattr(a, attr_name)
      if callable(attr):
        def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
          try:
            return attr(*args, **kwargs)
          except Exception, ex:
            # ...
        setattr(self, attr_name, wrapper) # or try self.__dict__[x] = y
share|improve this answer
    
The first, "old-school" solution is very inefficient: the wrapper() function is created each time a function is called. The second solution fails because it wraps the __class__ attribute into a function (instead of a new-style class), but this can be fixed by performing a test different from callable() (like isinstance(attr, types.MethodType)). –  EOL Sep 28 '11 at 21:26

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