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So I'm a c# noob. I have a quick question that I can't find an answer to anywhere else.

 [Serializable()]
 public class Dictionary
 {
    private Random m_RandomGenerator = new Random();

    public int GetNext() 
    {
        return m_RandomGenerator.Next(100);
    }
 }

The Dictionary instance is loaded each time the program starts, and this code will return the exact same sequence of numbers each time it is run. By which I mean, each time the executable is run. Surely the time value it's seeded with should be different (DateTime.Now.Ticks I assume?).

A couple of points:

  • There is only one instance of Dictionary, deserialized from a previously-exported file at startup.
  • If I make m_RandomGenerator static then the problem is fixed.

Does anyone know why? I did double check that I'm not creating a new instance of Dictionary each time, so that's not the issue.


Well, colour me embarrassed. As it turns out the culprit was the [Serializable()] attribute. The dictionary class I was using was loaded from a previously exported file, which was obviously loading the seed back into Random(). Changing the variable to static meant that the seed value was no longer loaded from the previously serialised instance - hiding the issue.

Thanks to all the people offering constructive advice!

share|improve this question
3  
Actually, are you sure the same sequence is returned each time with the above code? That would be ... interesting. (How is Dictionary being used?) –  user166390 Sep 28 '11 at 20:50
4  
This doesn't seem like a duplicate, Random is being instantiated only once –  RichK Sep 28 '11 at 20:52
2  
@JBeFat: wait, if you can post more of your code, we could help (this is definitely the place with the most skilled programmers ever, after all) –  digEmAll Sep 28 '11 at 21:08
3  
We are given a code that is working fine and produces random sequences, because random is seeded with Environment.TickCount in default constructor. Its also stated that this code produces same output , which is not true. Its as if I posted that true==false returns true and got 9 upvotes for that. I dont understand it. –  Valentin Kuzub Sep 28 '11 at 21:24
2  
"the culprit was the [Serializable()] attribute" - that's not in your repro, and that's too bad since the phenomenon of seeding an rng from a deserialization is interesting. Lern2ask. –  bzlm Sep 28 '11 at 21:33

5 Answers 5

(CW because this is way too big for a comment)

This test will only ever repeat when Random is seeded. You should post the code calling Dictionary because there may be something fishy there (assuming the code posted is the actual code) or even better post your own test that reproduces the issue.

[Test]
public void TestDictionary()
{
    var dictionary = new Dictionary();

    for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(dictionary.GetNext());
    }
}

[Serializable]  // added after the fact
public class Dictionary
{
    //private Random m_RandomGenerator = new Random(12);
    private Random m_RandomGenerator = new Random();

    public int GetNext()
    {
        return m_RandomGenerator.Next(100);
    }
}

This test does repeat your results but that's because of the answer here:

[Test]
public void TestDictionary2()
{
    var alpha = new Dictionary();
    var bravo = new Dictionary();

    for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}", alpha.GetNext(), bravo.GetNext());
    }
}

For completeness, here's a serialization test:

[Test]
public void SerializationPerhaps()
{
    var charlie = new Dictionary();
    Dictionary delta = null;

    // Borrowed from MSDN:  http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.serializableattribute.aspx

    //Opens a file and serializes the object into it in binary format.
    using (var stream = File.Open("data.xml", FileMode.Create))
    {
        var formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
        formatter.Serialize(stream, charlie);
    }


    //Opens file "data.xml" and deserializes the object from it.
    using (var stream = File.Open("data.xml", FileMode.Open))
    {
        var formatter = new BinaryFormatter();

        delta = (Dictionary) formatter.Deserialize(stream);
        stream.Close();
    }

    for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(charlie.GetNext(), delta.GetNext());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Well he did say there's only one instance of the dictionary ever so the second test should not be an issue. –  Jeff Mercado Sep 28 '11 at 21:15
1  
@JeffMercado: the OP also said that it occurs for each test run... In other words he closes the app and restarts it, then gets the same numbers in a row. –  NotMe Sep 28 '11 at 21:22
    
Well I was in the process of testing a serialized class when you edited the question. Protobuf-net wouldn't serialize it otherwise I might've been ahead of you. –  Austin Salonen Sep 28 '11 at 21:30

The source of your problem must be somwhere else than in the code you posted. Here is the same code, embedded in a test harness:

using System;

namespace RandomTest
{

    public class Dictionary
    {
        private Random m_RandomGenerator = new Random();

        public int GetNext()
        {
            return m_RandomGenerator.Next(100);
        }
    } 


    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Dictionary d = new Dictionary();

            for (int i=0;i<10;i++)
            {
                int r = d.GetNext();
                Console.Write("{0} ",r);
            }
            Console.WriteLine();

        }
    }
}

It returns a different sequence every time it is run.

share|improve this answer

Well without further code samples the answer to your question is simple.

It is not repetitive.

I plugged your code sample into a console application and the result is completely random.

namespace Sandbox
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Dictionary dict = new Dictionary();
            for (int count = 0; count < 100; count++)
                Console.WriteLine(dict.GetNext());
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

    public class Dictionary
    {
        private Random m_RandomGenerator = new Random();

        public int GetNext()
        {
            return m_RandomGenerator.Next(100);
        }
    }
}

Result:

share|improve this answer
    
You got my last upvote of the day. I can't recreate the OP's problem either. –  NotMe Sep 28 '11 at 21:24
1  
Hmm Alex Ford, I don't think this example is somehow related to question. you got a random sequence, and it was never questioned that sequence isn't random, he was saying that he gets same SEQUENCES, not same NUMBERS everytime Random.Next(100) is called. –  Valentin Kuzub Sep 28 '11 at 21:34
    
@ValentinKuzub Run the program twice... –  Alex Ford Sep 28 '11 at 21:42
1  
I look at your picture and you ran it once. It shows that Random.Next(100) produces not the same values. –  Valentin Kuzub Sep 28 '11 at 21:45
1  
Well to prove the point that its not reproducable it would be enough to request 1 number and launch program 2 times. By launching program 1 time and getting 100 numbers you are checking different functionality, which is unrelated to question. I am not looking for things to pick at, I am advocate of relevant answers and correctness. Austin Salonen said that seeding Random with Milliseconds is less granular than default constructor , I question that. Cubicle.Jockey answer is completely unrelated , I question that too. –  Valentin Kuzub Sep 28 '11 at 21:53

I don't know this is what you exactly want but this help me to solve my problem. Your post and other answer, comments bring me to this.

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary;

namespace SerializeRandom
{
    [Serializable]  // added after the fact
    public class RandomGenerator
    {
        const string fileName = "random.bin";
        private Random random = new Random();

        public int GetNext()
        {
            return random.Next(100);
        }

        public static void Save(RandomGenerator obj)
        {
            using (var stream = File.Open(fileName, FileMode.Create))
            {
                var formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
                formatter.Serialize(stream, obj);
            }
        }

        public static RandomGenerator Load()
        {
            RandomGenerator randomGenerator = null;

            //create new object if file not exist
            if (!File.Exists(fileName))
            {
                randomGenerator = new RandomGenerator();
            }
            else
            {
                //load from bin file
                using (var stream = File.Open(fileName, FileMode.Open))
                {
                    var formatter = new BinaryFormatter();

                    randomGenerator = (RandomGenerator)formatter.Deserialize(stream);
                    stream.Close();
                }
            }

            return randomGenerator;
        }

    }

    }

and test class

using System.Collections.Generic;
using NUnit.Framework;

namespace SerializeRandom
{
    public class RandomGeneratorTest
    {
        [Test]
        public void TestDictionary1()
        {
            var randomGenerator = RandomGenerator.Load();

            var randomResult1 = new List<int>();
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            {
                randomResult1.Add(randomGenerator.GetNext());
            }
            RandomGenerator.Save(randomGenerator);

            randomGenerator = RandomGenerator.Load();
            var randomResult2 = new List<int>();
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            {
                randomResult2.Add(randomGenerator.GetNext());
            }

            CollectionAssert.AreNotEqual(randomResult1, randomResult2);

        }

    }
}
share|improve this answer

Thats because it (Random()) is a pseudorandom number generator.

A seed is required to initialize the random number generator to make it not repetitive.

An acceptable choice is to use the computer time as the seed.

However, because the clock has finite resolution, using the parameterless constructor to create different Random objects in close succession creates random number generators that produce identical sequences of random numbers.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.random.aspx

I'd be careful with the default constructor with no parameters.

share|improve this answer
2  
What? No... using the default constructor (which he is apparently doing), it will be seeded based on the time of the day. –  Jeff Mercado Sep 28 '11 at 21:12
    
@Jeff - The default constructor can create the same sets of numbers. The seed is important, that was my only point. Same seed, same numbers. –  Jon Raynor Sep 28 '11 at 21:21

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