Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

so i have an array of custom objects. i want to go through them to find the maxx, maxy, minx, and miny values. i need the largest of the maxes and smallest of the mins. the following code makes complete sense to me, but i tend to get a random value from the list, my maxes do not get the max or min, and the mins do not get the min or the max.

so, i take the first values from the first object in the array, i then compare each objects values to my current maxx, maxy, minx, miny to see if the object's values are larger or less then, and if so, assign it:

        claimCenterBoundary = [dataCenter.claimCenterBoundaryList objectAtIndex:0];
        maxx = claimCenterBoundary.maxx;
        maxy = claimCenterBoundary.maxy;
        minx = claimCenterBoundary.minx;
        miny = claimCenterBoundary.miny;

        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) 
        {
            claimCenterBoundary = [dataCenter.claimCenterBoundaryList objectAtIndex:i];
            NSLog(@"minx: %@ miny: %@ maxx: %@ maxy: %@", claimCenterBoundary.minx, claimCenterBoundary.miny, claimCenterBoundary.maxx, claimCenterBoundary.maxy);

            if (maxx < claimCenterBoundary.maxx)
                maxx = claimCenterBoundary.maxx;

            if (maxy < claimCenterBoundary.maxy)
                maxy = claimCenterBoundary.maxy;

            if (minx > claimCenterBoundary.minx)
                minx = claimCenterBoundary.minx;

            if (miny > claimCenterBoundary.miny)
                miny = claimCenterBoundary.miny;
        }

here is my output:

count: 8
minx: -98.9139404296875 miny: 48.51737594604492 maxx: -98.90547943115234 maxy: 48.52248382568359
minx: -98.9139404296875 miny: 48.51737594604492 maxx: -98.90547943115234 maxy: 48.52248382568359
minx: -98.92726898193359 miny: 48.51534652709961 maxx: -98.91975402832031 maxy: 48.52249908447266
minx: -98.92726898193359 miny: 48.51534652709961 maxx: -98.91975402832031 maxy: 48.52249908447266
minx: -98.92340850830078 miny: 48.51531219482422 maxx: -98.91383361816406 maxy: 48.52248382568359
minx: -98.92340850830078 miny: 48.51531219482422 maxx: -98.91383361816406 maxy: 48.52248382568359
minx: -98.909423828125 miny: 48.51529693603516 maxx: -98.90548706054688 maxy: 48.51742553710938
minx: -98.96006774902344 miny: 48.51530075073242 maxx: -98.94926452636719 maxy: 48.52977752685547
final minx :-98.92726898193359 miny: 48.51531219482422 maxx: -98.94926452636719 maxy: 48.52977752685547

i can not figure out why this code would not work.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This line...

NSLog(@"minx: %@ miny: %@ maxx: %@ maxy: %@", claimCenterBoundary.minx, claimCenterBoundary.miny, claimCenterBoundary.maxx, claimCenterBoundary.maxy);

... implies that the return values of -minx, -miny, -maxx, -maxy are all objects, and most likely NSNumber objects.

If that's the case, then you can't use < and > to compare two NSNumbers. You'd be doing pointer comparison, which is most definitely not what you want.

So what you could do instead is this:

NSArray *objects = dataCenter.claimCenterBoundaryList;
NSNumber *minx = [objects valueForKeyPath:@"@min.minx"];
NSNumber *miny = [objects valueForKeyPath:@"@min.miny"];
NSNumber *maxx = [objects valueForKeyPath:@"@min.maxx"];
NSNumber *maxy = [objects valueForKeyPath:@"@min.maxy"];

This is technically 4 times less efficient than your original proposal, since you're going to iterate the entire list 4 times instead of once, but if your list is a reasonable size, then the difference is probably negligible.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, but hoping to see a blog post telling us how to implement -(NSArray*)valuesForKeyPaths:(NSArray*)paths efficiently any day now... ;-) –  Caleb Sep 28 '11 at 21:32
    
+1 This sounds a lot better than my answer, and looks to be correct. –  chown Sep 28 '11 at 21:51
    
works like a charm, thank you very much! –  Log139 Sep 28 '11 at 22:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.