Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Recently I was working a friend who wanted to make C++ more Haskell-y, and we wanted a function that's basically like this:

auto sum(auto a, auto b) {
    return a + b;
}

Apparently I can't use auto as a parameter type, so I changed it to this:

template<class A, class B>
auto sum(A a, B b) {
    return a + b;
}

But that doesn't work either. What we eventually realized we need this:

template<class A, class B>
auto sum(A a, B b) -> decltype(a + b) {
    return a + b;
}

So my question is, what's the point? Isn't decltype just repeating information, since the compiler can just look at the return statement?

I considered that maybe it's needed so we can just include a header file:

template<class A, class B>
auto sum(A a, B b) -> decltype(a + b);

... but we can't use templates like that anyway.

The other thing I considered was that it might be easier for the compiler, but it seems like it would actually be harder.

Case 1: With decltype

  • Figure out the type of the decltype statement
  • Figure out the types of any return values
  • See if they match

Case 2: Without decltype

  • Figure out the types of any return values
  • See if they match

So with those things in mind, what's the point of the trailing return type with decltype?

share|improve this question
4  
I think that's because all the type information of the function must be known just from the declaration (that doesn't include the function body), without needing to go through the definition. –  Matteo Italia Sep 28 '11 at 21:28
2  
I believe that question would be better worded as "Why do we need trailing return types?" They are just one use-case for decltype and the question doesn't touch on any of the others. –  pmr Sep 28 '11 at 21:35
4  
@LucDanton Right, so it should rather be "Why can't we have automatically deduced return types?" –  pmr Sep 28 '11 at 21:43
2  
@Brendan: Simple answer is it could, but the committee either explicitly or implicitly concluded it wasn't worth the effort. C++ is an overly-complex language already, and adding rules to allow this is possible but adds even more complexity. That is, I agree being able to say auto foo(auto x, auto y) { return x + y;} would be nice, and it's certainly possible, but it's just as doable with the extra syntax, just more annoying; the annoyance is easier to deal with than new rules. That said, it is extremely unfortunate they didn't elaborate on deducing return types for things like lambdas. –  GManNickG Sep 28 '11 at 23:02
3  
I know it's a lot later now, but GCC 4.8.0 has support for this with the -std=c++1y option. It's being proposed right now. –  chris Apr 4 '13 at 20:47
show 2 more comments

5 Answers

up vote 34 down vote accepted

What if we have the following:

template<class A, class B, class C>
auto sum(A a, B b, C c) {
   if (rand () == 0) return a + b;

   // do something else...

    return a + c;
}

.. where a + b and a + c expressions yield different type of results. What should compiler decide to put as a return type for that function and why? This case is already covered by C++11 lambdas which allow to omit the return type as long as return statements can be deduced to the same type (NB standard quote needed, some sources claim only one return expression is allowed and that this is a gcc glitch).


A technical reason is that C++ allows the definition and declaration to be separate.

template<class A, class B>
auto sum(A a, B b) -> decltype(a + b);

template<class A, class B>
auto sum(A a, B b) -> decltype(a + b)
{
}

The definition of the template could be in the header. Or it could be in another file, so that you don't have to wade through pages and pages of function definitions when looking through an interface.

C++ has to account for all possibilities. Restricting trailing return types to just function definitions means that you can't do something as simple as this:

template<class A, class B>
class Foo
{
  auto sum(A a, B b) -> decltype(a + b);
}

template<class A, class B>
auto Foo<A, B>::sum(A a, B b) -> decltype(a + b)
{
}
share|improve this answer
2  
The function wouldn't compile anyway if the return statements return different things. –  Brendan Long Sep 28 '11 at 21:33
10  
@BrendanLong: Not necessarily. There can be implicit conversion going on. But without explicit type compiler won't know what to convert and why. –  drak0sha Sep 28 '11 at 21:34
12  
Technically, this is a solved problem. Lambdas allow you to omit the return type, so long as the decltype of all of the return statements is the same. So C++11 already has language that would solve this problem; compilers will report an error in a lambda where the returns are inconsistent. Therefore, this alone is not a valid reason for the spec to require trailing return types on named functions. –  Nicol Bolas Sep 28 '11 at 21:47
2  
True, lambdas determine return type and fail if you try to return different things. Perhaps there is nothing that actually stands on the way of throwing this level of intelligence to compilers... except that maybe function declarations may play a significant part in SFINATE, and not specifying the type explicitly may not work out well... I don't know. –  drak0sha Sep 28 '11 at 21:51
1  
Perhaps we should combine our answers together and make a community wiki. –  drak0sha Sep 28 '11 at 22:06
show 8 more comments

but we can't use templates like that anyway.

First, trailing return types aren't purely a template thing. They work for all functions. Secondly, says who? This is perfectly legal code:

template<class A, class B>
auto sum(A a, B b) -> decltype(a + b);

template<class A, class B>
auto sum(A a, B b) -> decltype(a + b)
{
}

The definition of the template could be in the header. Or it could be in another file, so that you don't have to wade through pages and pages of function definitions when looking through an interface.

C++ has to account for all possibilities. Restricting trailing return types to just function definitions means that you can't do something as simple as this:

template<class A, class B>
class Foo
{
  auto sum(A a, B b) -> decltype(a + b);
}

template<class A, class B>
auto Foo<A, B>::sum(A a, B b) -> decltype(a + b)
{
}

And this is fairly common for many programmers. There's nothing wrong with wanting to code this way.

The only reason lambdas get away without the return type is because they have to have a function body defined with the definition. If you restricted trailing return types to only those functions where the definition was available, you wouldn't be able to use either of the above cases.

share|improve this answer
    
In theory though it is possible to implement such a feature, but only for cases where function yields one and only one type of result. And ignore function if matching definition is not found... But seems like way to much intelligence for a vague feature... –  drak0sha Sep 28 '11 at 21:48
2  
@VladLazarenko: In theory nothing; Lambdas do it right now. You don't have to specify a return type unless the different types of the return values in the lambda disagree. The specification could have allowed it, but it would also have meant disallowing forward declarations of the function. –  Nicol Bolas Sep 28 '11 at 21:50
    
Makes sense. +1 –  drak0sha Sep 28 '11 at 21:52
    
Definitely a good point. I wish they had just required this when you actually use a forward declaration. :\ –  Brendan Long Sep 29 '11 at 1:30
add comment

There is no technical reason why it is not possible. The main reason they haven't is because the C++ language moves very slowly and it takes a very long time for features to be added.

You can nearly get the nice syntax you want with lambdas (but you can't have templacised arguments in lambdas, again for no good reason).

auto foo = [](int a, double b)
{
    return a + b;
};

Yes, there are some cases where the return type could not be automatically deduced. Just like in a lambda, it could simply be a requirement to declare the return type yourself in those ambiguous cases.

At the moment, the restrictions are just so arbitrary as to be quite frustrating. Also see the removal of concepts for added frustration.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's definitely interesting that it works for lambdas. –  Brendan Long Sep 29 '11 at 1:28
    
You can't overload the function either, using this. –  Paul Jun 21 '12 at 16:05
add comment

In a blog post from Dave Abrahams, he discusses a proposal for having this function syntax:

[]min(x, y)
{ return x < y ? x : y }

This is based off of possible proposal for polymorphic lambdas. He has also started work here on updating clang to support this syntax.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Little hope to persuade the committee to add a language feature like this, though there is no technical obstacles. But maybe it's possible to persuade the GCC group to add a compiler extension.

share|improve this answer
    
Based on these answers, I'm not sure it's something C++ will ever support. C++ parses the code in a very specific way, and even though we could figure out the return type, it would violate rules about C++ compilers are supposed to work. :( –  Brendan Long Oct 5 '11 at 3:52
    
A brave claim... which history has now shown to be wrong. –  Ben Voigt Dec 16 '13 at 20:24
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.