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I have a Maven project multimodule project. Some of the modules create custom packaging for the libraries produced by the other modules. The packaging being used has its own suite of versioned dependencies that I need to play nice with.

As an example: my parent POM might have an entry for e.g. commons-codec:commons-codec 1.4, my "core-lib" POM includes it as a dependency (sans explicit version), and I want to make sure my packaging module bundles in the right version. However, the specific type of custom packaging that I'm using also needs e.g. log4j:log4j 1.2.15, and I want to make sure that when my packaging module runs, it also bundles the correct log4j version.

Here's the wrinkle: the example POM I'm working from for "project that makes {custom packaging}" uses a parent that's provided by the custom-packaging team. If I use their parent, I lose the version info for commons-codec. If I use my parent, I lose the version info for log4j.

Now, ordinarily if I ask "how do I make A and B depend on the same version", you'd answer "make A and B have the same parent, and include a dependencyManagementsection in the parent". My problem is, I need A, B, and C to depend on the same version, but I don't have any control over C.

I think this is what Maven "mixins" are meant to address, but of course they don't exist yet. In the meantime, what I've been doing is picking one parent, then copy-and-pasting the dependencyManagement section from the other POM, with a comment saying "make sure you keep this up to date". Obviously this is an ugly, ugly hack, but I haven't found another way to keep current with both sides.

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3 Answers 3

What about using the assembly plugin to pack up your artifact with all its dependencies and having your packaging module run on that instead? Then you're not trying any pom magic. It's just a matter of one project using the artifact from another project, like usual.

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You mean like, A is the library, B makes a jar-with-deps out of the library, then C unpacks the artifact from B, and repacks it into our custom packaging? Might just be crazy enough to work; I'll look into it –  Coderer Sep 29 '11 at 20:35
    
A thought occurs to me: suppose A (the library) shares a dependency with C (the custom packaging / runtime) -- maybe I use log4j in my business logic, and they use it in their daemon wrapper or what have you. Couldn't we wind up including two versions using your method? –  Coderer Sep 29 '11 at 20:44
    
1) You shouldn't need a separate B to make the jar-with-deps. Just configure the assembly plugin in A. 2) If A and C have dependency conflicts and C can't take care of that, it seems you should maybe be using a better daemonizer. The classpath of your wrapper/container should be completely separate from that of your app for this exact reason. I.e., I don't see this as a problem to be solved in your POMs. –  Ryan Stewart Oct 1 '11 at 0:27
up vote 0 down vote accepted

For now, I'm going to accept the answer of "this is one of the really sucky things about Maven". Maybe this question can get updated when Maven 3.1 finally launches.

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Could you not activate multiple profiles which have their own dependency section pulling in the required libraries when enabled. This allows some nice flexibility due to the ways that profiles can be activated.

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I don't think profiles have anything to do with this. Suppose I have two projects (call them "A" and "B"), and I want them both to use AwesomeLogger v1.2.3. However, each of them needs to be packaged in MySuperContainer. Now, suppose the easiest way to create MySuperContainer packages is to make the "MSC" parent-POM the project's parent. If I do this, there's no way to have a declaration in a single POM file somewhere saying "Use AwesomeLogger 1.2.3" for both A and B. –  Coderer Jan 11 '12 at 20:55

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