Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two classes one is derived from CheckBoxList and the second one from DropDownList. The code inside them is exactly the same. The only difference is that I need first one at places where I need to show checkboxlist and second one to show dropdownlist. Below is my code:

using System;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
using System.Web.UI.WebControls;

    namespace Sample
    {
        public class MyCheckBoxList : CheckBoxList
        {
            public int A { get; set; }
            public int B { get; set; }
            protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e)
            {
                //dummy task
                Collection<int> ints = new Collection<int>();
                //........
                this.DataSource = ints;
                this.DataBind();
            }
        }
    }

The second one

using System;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
using System.Web.UI.WebControls;

namespace Sample
{
    public class MyDropDownList : DropDownList
    {
        public int  A { get; set; }
        public int  B { get; set; }
        protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e)
        {
            //dummy task
            Collection<int> ints = new Collection<int>();
            //........
            this.DataSource = ints;
            this.DataBind();
        }
    }
}

Now as you can see the internal code is exactly the same which I want to avoid. How can I make a common class for it so as to remove code duplicacy?

share|improve this question
3  
+1 for striving to reduce redundancy in your code. Your question may be better suited here though: codereview.stackexchange.com –  Kiley Naro Sep 28 '11 at 21:50
    
@KileyNaro: Cool to learn about codereview, didn't know it existed. Don't think its a bad match for SO either. Good question I think. +1 –  Avada Kedavra Sep 28 '11 at 21:57
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can create a third class

public class Entity
{
    public int  A { get; set; }
    public int  B { get; set; }
    Collection<int> GetCollection()
    {
        //dummy task
        Collection<int> ints = new Collection<int>();
        //........
        return ints;
    }
}

And then use it in other classes

public class MyDropDownList : DropDownList
{
    public MyDropDownList() { Entity = new Entity(); }

    public Entity {get;set;}
    protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e)
    {
        this.DataSource = Entity.GetCollection();
        this.DataBind();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
but this leads to fetch my properties like Entity.A and Entity.B. I want to avoid that. I want the properties directly from my aspx pages. –  Rocky Singh Sep 28 '11 at 21:56
    
@Rocky : Encapsulate the Entity , make it private and make a property on your class to access it. –  Arjang Sep 28 '11 at 22:16
    
+1 for using composition, the only thing left was making Entity internal, using Encapsulation so externally it is not needed –  Arjang Sep 29 '11 at 6:36
add comment

you can not, because c# does not support multiple inheritance of implementation (and you are already subclassing). you could refactor some of the code into a third class and have each of your classes have an instance and delegate calls to it.

you could try something like this: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/architecture/smip.aspx, but it looks like a lot of work.

share|improve this answer
    
Just because I'm curious and really have no idea, would you mind elaborating on how one might use delegates to achieve what the OP is looking for? –  Kiley Naro Sep 29 '11 at 2:27
1  
i just meant to delegate the calls to the third object. i was not referring to c#'s delegate. –  Ray Tayek Sep 29 '11 at 22:35
    
Thanks for the clarification. I understand what you mean! –  Kiley Naro Sep 29 '11 at 23:03
    
@Kiley : That article is nonsensical, there are common design patterns to handle this, There has been no such thing as "Simulated Multiple Inheritence". Neither the code it that article works nor the name is valid. There are tested and proven design patterns to use instead. –  Arjang Sep 30 '11 at 4:56
    
@Arjang Hmm, interesting... I actually didn't even look at the codeproject article! Just for the sake of being thorough, could you suggest some reading on the tested and proven design patterns that you would recommend using in place of MI for C#? –  Kiley Naro Sep 30 '11 at 14:06
show 1 more comment

It would seem that what you are trying to accomplish is to have a single class, that is MyDropDownList, be able to inherit properties from the DropDownList, and to have the MyCheckBox class inherit properties from the CheckBox class, while having your two My* classes have some extra properties, which happen to be identical.

As others have suggested, the easiest way to accomplish this would be through Multiple Inheritance. In your example specifically, that would mean creating a (possibly abstract) class that describes the shared attributes between MyDropDownList and MyCheckBox, and then have those two classes inherit from both their respective System.Web.UI.WebControls bases as well as this "shared" class. However, as it has been said, C# doesn't support multiple inheritance. From Chris Brumme via that link:

The number of places where MI is truly appropriate is actually quite small. In many cases, multiple interface inheritance can get the job done instead. In other cases, you may be able to use encapsulation and delegation.

You may have also considered using Interfaces. This, as you may have discovered, would be an inappropriate choice for your solution as an Interface only allows you to define that there are certain properties and methods in a class, but not how the properties or methods are defined. So again, this is an inappropriate choice for removing duplicate code.

What does this mean for you? Well, if you're looking to write a MyDropDownList class that supports both myCustomDDLInstance.SelectedIndex and myCustomDDLInstance.A syntaxes, you will have to do a little bit of "magic". But the fact that your language doesn't support what you are trying to do should raise a red flag! It's not necessarily wrong, but it should be a strong indicator that you may want to reexamine your design.

My guess is that the duplicated part of the two classes can stand alone as it's own logical entity. This means that you can justifiably create your own class to hold these shared properties and methods. Here's what we get:

SampleControl.cs

public class SampleControl
{
    public int A { get; set; }
    public int B { get; set; }

    public Collection<int> MysteryCollection
    {
        get
        {
            Collection<int> ints = new Collection<int>();
            //........
            return ints;
        }
    }
}

If CSharp did in-fact support multiple inheritance, your MyDropDownList class could inherit from both DropDownList and SampleControl and you'd be done. But again, this isn't possible.

So how do we accomplish your goal? It's a bit convoluted, but you can Encapsulate your shared properties and methods in each of your custom classes. Here's an example for the MyDropDownList class (note that MyCheckBoxList would be the same, just change the class name:

public class MyDropDownList : DropDownList
{
    private SampleControl mySampleControl { get; set; }

    public int A
    {
        get
        {
            return mySampleControl.A;
        }

        set
        {
            mySampleControl.A = value;
        }
    }

    public int B
    {
        get
        {
            return mySampleControl.B;
        }

        set
        {
            mySampleControl.B = value;
        }
    }

    public MyDropDownList()
    {
        mySampleControl = new SampleControl();
    }

    protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e)
    {
        //dummy task
        this.DataSource = mySampleControl.MysteryCollection;
        this.DataBind();
    }
}

A class designed in this way, while a bit convoluted, should accomplish the type syntax that you are looking for.

As a final note I would strongly encourage you to at least consider re-examining your design and seeing if there is a better way for you to approach your class hierarchy. My recommendation is that if your shared attributes can exist on their own as a logical entity, they probably should be their own class. And if so, that class is probably a rightful and logical member of your MyDropDownList and MyCheckBox classes. Which means that you should be using the myDropDownListInstance.SharedAttributesClassName.A syntax. It's both more explicit and more honest.

share|improve this answer
    
This is Composition, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Composition_over_inheritance –  Arjang Sep 30 '11 at 22:07
add comment

You use composition, Make another class that is not related to these two classes, then have the common code in that one, when you need to use the code in either classes you make an instance, you can also use it thorugh an interface. No need to use inheritnece.

Update : Code Below ( Modified the code already provided by meziantou)

 internal interface IEntity
    {
        int A { get; set; }
        int B { get; set; }
        Collection<int> GetCollection { get; }
    }

    internal class Entity : TrialBalanceHTMLToDataTable.TrialBalance.IEntity
    {
        public int A { get; set; }
        public int B { get; set; }
        public Collection<int> GetCollection
        {
            get{
            //dummy task 
            Collection<int> ints = new Collection<int>();
            //........ 
            return ints;
            }
        }
    }


    public class MyDropDownList : DropDownList
    {
        public MyDropDownList() { _Entity = new Entity(); }

        private IEntity _Entity { get; set; }
        protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e)
        {
            this.DataSource = _Entity.GetCollection;
            this.DataBind();
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
-1 to say that an interface will solve the problem; the definitions will still be duplicated between the two classes implementing the interface. But you get +1 for suggesting that the common code be moved to another class... so you break even! –  Kiley Naro Sep 29 '11 at 2:25
    
@KileyNaro : LOL :) , Interfaces don't solve problems they just allow you to uniformise them! –  Arjang Sep 29 '11 at 2:31
    
@KileyNaro : NO! the common class wil implement the interface the other two class will only use it to talk to the class that implements it, The idea was not to implment the interfaces in two different class –  Arjang Sep 29 '11 at 6:26
    
I think I'm a little confused... could you provide a small snippet of code to help clarify? –  Kiley Naro Sep 29 '11 at 13:21
    
@KileyNaro : Updated it modifying the code that was already provided by meziantou. –  Arjang Sep 29 '11 at 22:35
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.