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I'm rendering a partial in a collection:

<%= render :partial => 'superlative', :collection => @profile.superlatives, :locals => {:superlative_count => @profile.superlatives.length} %>

Here is the partial:

<li class="superlative"><span title="<%= superlative.name %>">
  <%= superlative.body %>
</span></li>

I want to render the collection so that:

  • Every item except the last renders with a comma and space at the end
  • The last item starts with and

So that the collection looks like this in its entirety: body, body, body, and body

I have some of that working with the code below but can't get the spacing right. Can someone help? Maybe there's also an easier way to do it? Thanks!

<% if superlative_counter + 1 == superlative_count %>
<li class="superlative"><span title="<%= superlative.name %>">
  <%= "and #{superlative.body}" %>
</span></li>
<% else %>
<li class="superlative"><span title="<%= superlative.name %>">
  <%= "#{superlative.body}," %>
</span></li>
<% end %>
share|improve this question
    
I always like to see how Rails does similar things before I write my own code. Since Rails already adds to_sentence on an array that does this (albeit without additional markup or partials), you could check that code out first and see what you can learn/use from it: github.com/rails/rails/blob/master/activesupport/lib/… – coreyward Sep 29 '11 at 0:57
    
Yeah @Jordan helped me use to_sentence but that rendered everything as one sentence. I needed to render each individual <li> so my tooltip was intact. – tvalent2 Sep 29 '11 at 1:09
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It occurs to me there's another way to do this. Using CSS pseudo-elements you can just insert commas and "and" where you want them. Take a look in this fiddle. The major caveat here is that, at least in some browsers, if someone copy-and-pastes the list the pseudo-elements' content won't be included (i.e. they get "foo bar baz" even though they saw "foo, bar, and baz."

Assuming you want to do it in Ruby, though, what spacing issues are you seeing? I assume you're using CSS to turn a <ul> into a sentence--is there a particular reason you need each word to be inside an <li>? Your code looks fine, but I might be tempted to tweak it by moving those commas and 'and's outside the <span>s:

<% if superlative_counter + 1 == superlative_count %>
  <li class="superlative">
    and <span title="<%= superlative.name %>"><%= superlative.body %></span>
  </li>
<% else %>
  <li class="superlative">
    <span title="<%= superlative.name %>"><%= superlative.body %></span>,&nbsp;
  </li>
<% end %>

...but I'm not sure that'll have any effect on a spacing issue.

share|improve this answer
    
Edited it just a bit (removed a " and added a space after comma), but that did the trick. Thanks again, @Jordan! – tvalent2 Sep 29 '11 at 0:25
    
By the way, is there a place where the _counter +1, etc. is explained? What does _counter +1 or _counter % 4 (as I saw in another question here) mean? – tvalent2 Sep 29 '11 at 0:29
    
That's just math. superlative_counter is just the number of the item in the collection being handled (if it's the first item, you get 0; if it's the second item, you get 1). So the first line in the code just tests whether it's the last item. % is the modulo operator, i.e. the remainder: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modulo_operation Often you'll see n % 2 == 0 which is just a quick test for evenness (n % 2 is the remainder of n / 2, and if the remainder is 0 then n is even). You could use n % 4 == 0 to, say, make every 4th item highlighted. – Jordan Sep 29 '11 at 17:48

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