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I wrote a program that does some processing on an image delivered via a web cam. There is an event that fires whenever a new frame is received from the camera. However, this happens more frequently than I'd like - so frequently that my image processing function doesn't complete before a new event appears and calls the same function again.

How can I control when the event fires? Can I execute my image processing, say, every 5 events instead? I believe I have the pseudo code figured out, but I would prefer to see some examples in C#.

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That pseudo code would be a great help in understanding your problem. –  Kirk Woll Sep 28 '11 at 22:12
    
Does the callback function need to be thread-safe? –  Esteban Araya Sep 28 '11 at 22:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Place the event callback "guarded" as follows. Then it won't be doing the processing many times at the same time.

private bool m_active;
void YourCallback(object sender, EventArgs args) 
{
  if(!m_active) 
  {
    try 
    { 
      m_active = true;
      // Do the work here... 
    }
    finally { m_active = false; }
  }
}

EDIT : Thread safe if using f.i. Semaphore.

private System.Threading.Semaphore m_Semaphore = new System.Threading.Semaphore(0, 1);
void YourCallback(object sender, EventArgs args) 
{
  if(m_Semaphore.WaitOne(0)) 
  {
    try 
    { 
      // Do the work here... 
    }
    finally { m_Semaphore.Release(); }
  }
}
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I doubt that this code is not thread safe. Am I right?? –  Sam Sep 29 '11 at 0:01
    
@Sam Correct. It thought it would be no large issue. But you never know. Added a thread safe version. –  erikH Sep 29 '11 at 3:53
    
I'd probably lock instead of using a semaphore... the semaphore does not guarantee that threads will enter in the same order they were queued in. –  Esteban Araya Sep 29 '11 at 4:18
    
The original question did not wanted to queue threads, but return at once if the callback was still executed. –  erikH Sep 29 '11 at 6:31

You could use IObservable.SkipWhile to skip the event reaching your handler while your image processing is happening.

This question has a similar problem:

Filtering a Touch.FrameReported IObservable using arbitrary boolean condition that changes over time

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Then what's the psuedo code you've got? I'd love to translate it to C#. ;-)

You could use a DateTime variable in which you store the last occurrence of the event, and then skip out of the event if less than the desired time has passed.

So, something like this if you want it to work once a second, no matter how many times it's being fired:

private DateTime _lastEvent = DateTime.Now;

public void Event()
{
    if (_lastEvent + new TimeSpan(0, 0, 1) > DateTime.Now)
        return;

    _lastEvent = DateTime.Now;

    // Now do your event
    Console.WriteLine("Tick! " + _lastEvent);
}
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Supposing that you are attaching to the event using something similar to:

public MyObject()
{    
   MyImageObject.Update += new UpdateEventHandler(ImageDataUpdated); 
}

private void ImageDataUpdated(object sender, EventArgs e) 
{
    // do stuff
}

You could detach from the event in the beginning of the event handler and then use a timer to re-attach after a certain time interval. This would give you a somewhat exact control of the update rate. Something like:

public MyObject()
{    
   MyTimer = new System.Timers.Timer(100); // 10 Hz
   MyTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(OnTimedEvent);
   MyTimer.Enabled = true;
}

private void ImageDataUpdated(object sender, EventArgs e) 
{
   // detach from the event to keep it from fireing until the timer event has fired.
   MyImageObject.Update -= new UpdateEventHandler(ImageDataUpdated);

    // do stuff
}

private static void OnTimedEvent(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    // (re-)attach to the event handler.
   MyImageObject.Update += new UpdateEventHandler(ImageDataUpdated); 
}

Using this strategy there is a good change that you are preventing the underlying image object to do additional work while the event handler is detached (of course this depends on the implementation of the image object). Chances are that you are saving CPU-cycles for your own image processing.

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4  
2 downvotes and no comments? please tell me what is wrong with my answer so I get the chance to learn from my mistake.. –  Avada Kedavra Sep 29 '11 at 7:45
    
In order to figure out if the logic above is bad practice I have opened a specific question for this. Its located here: stackoverflow.com/questions/7594948/… –  Avada Kedavra Sep 29 '11 at 9:10

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