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I know this question gets asked a lot but I am still really confused as to how to go about fixing my problem. I have attempted to write code that handles command line input for the possibility of several pipes. However, I am unsuccessful and my code, although executing does not work correctly. The bug is once I've forked the children, I cannot get to the next command that the pipe goes to after the very first command executes. How do I move to the next command in the pipe without grabbing the wrong file descriptors? Here is a chunk of code;

      a = 0;
      while (a < cmdnum)
      {
      pid[a] = fork();
      if( pid[a] == 0)
      {
      if( a == 0)
        {

          close(1);
          dup(p1_to_pn[a][1]);
          for( k = 0; k < nump; k++)
            {
              close(p1_to_pn[k][0]);
              close(p1_to_pn[k][1]);
            }  

          args = tokenize(cmd[a]);
          execv(args[0], args);
        }
      else if ( a == (cmdnum-1))
        {

          close(0);
          dup(p1_to_pn[a][0]);
          for( k = 0; k < nump; k++)
            {
              close(p1_to_pn[k][0]);
              close(p1_to_pn[k][1]);
            }
          args = tokenize(cmd[a]);

          i = execv(args[0], args);
        }
      else
        {

          close(0);
          dup(p1_to_pn[a][0]);
          close(1);
          dup(p1_to_pn[a][1]);
          for( k = 0; k < nump; k ++)
            {
              close(p1_to_pn[k][0]);
              close(p1_to_pn[k][1]);
           }
          args = tokenize(cmd[a]);

          execv(args[0], args);
        }
    }
  a++;
}
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Just to clarify, are you writing a shell (or something that works like a shell)? –  Greg Hewgill Sep 29 '11 at 0:36
    
a type of shell, yes –  GFXGunblade Sep 29 '11 at 1:13

1 Answer 1

Your mistake is thinking you need to move to the "next" command. Start them all.

Here's the basic idea, for a pipeline like A | B | C

The parent process reads the command line. For each new command, it is going to fork a new process, and eventually exec it. The parent process already has fd 0,1,2 open (STDIN, STDOUT, and STDERR.) When you hit the pipe, use the pipe(2) and dup(2) system calls to make a new fd; fork the next process.

All the fd manipulation happens in the parent process.

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Ah wow, can't believe I missed that. Thank you –  GFXGunblade Sep 29 '11 at 0:37
    
Oh, I can. I spent most of a night in grad school in a systems programming course figuring it out. –  Charlie Martin Sep 29 '11 at 0:48
    
One thing I'm not quite understanding about the pipe function is, when you call pipe(2), doesn't it make two new file descriptors? how would you get, say a two-pipe call to read the output from the second command as the third's input? Wouldn't the third command's input file descriptor be pointing to a different place? –  GFXGunblade Sep 29 '11 at 1:42
    
@GFXGunblade, the parent process maintains two pipes. The parent process initially creates the original input pipe, say in[]. Before forking a child, it creates a new pipe, out[]. The child process moves in[0] to STDIN_FILENO and out[1] to STDOUT_FILENO, and closes in[1] and out[0]. The parent process closes in[0] and out[1] since they were used by the child, and copies in[0] = out[0] for the next child. After all child processes have been created, in[0] is the read end of the last command in the pipe list. You'll have (commands+1) pipes total, 2 per process. –  Nominal Animal Oct 1 '12 at 1:56

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