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I'm trying to use basic operators to create my own custom array in JavaScript, I guess.

This book I'm reading, "Eloquent JavaScript", has an exercise in Chapter 1 that asks me to make a pyramid using the "print" function. There's no print function in any of my interpreters, and it doesn't say how to make a print function. So, I don't have a print function, and I'm using alerts.

Here's the code.

var line = "";
var counter = 0;
while (counter < 10) {
  line = line + "#";
  print(line);
  counter = counter + 1;
}

So, I was trying to use alerts, instead:

var line = "";
var counter = 0;
while (counter < 10) {
  line = line + "#";
  alert(line);
  counter = counter + 1;
}

But the alert isn't a triangle. It's a bunch of boxes where the number of pound signs grows each time.

I want to create a string concatenation and then print out the entire result.

This is what I came up with:

string = "";
counter = 0;
signs = "#";
while (counter < 10){
  string = string + signs + "\n";
  signs = signs + "#";
  counter = counter + 1;
}
alert(string);

So, I am just wondering, is there a better way to create arrays without knowing how to create array variable?

share|improve this question
    
did you try console.log() –  Jesus Ramos Sep 29 '11 at 2:13
    
you can use document.write() –  Michael Berkowski Sep 29 '11 at 2:13
2  
And replace "/n" with "\n" Newlines are backslash-n, not slash-n –  Michael Berkowski Sep 29 '11 at 2:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The newline character is "\n" not "/n". (The "escape" character in general is backslash not forward slash.)

Also, you have a typo that you said sings = ... instead of signs = ...

EDIT: OK, so you've updated your question to correct both of those problems. Regarding your new question:

So, I am just wondering, is there a better way to create arrays without knowing how to create array variable?

It sounds like you don't really understand what an array variable is: an array is a data structure that allows you to store data items that are selected by indices. Why do you think you need an array for this "pyramid" functionality?

As an aside, your code could be improved using += and ++:

  • a = a + b; can be abbreviated as a += b;
  • a = a + 1; can be abbreviated as a++;
share|improve this answer
    
I don't 'really need an array. I'm just curious about what they are, how they work, etc. I was wondering if what I made was an array. Apparently it isn't.... –  千里ちゃん Sep 29 '11 at 2:36
    
Arrays are much more useful cause you can subtract from them. If I wanted to create an isosceles triangle, rather than a right triangle, I would want to start with a bunch of spaces and then reduce the number of spaces by 1 each time. To do this without writing the spaces out on each line, I'd need some kind of string subtraction function. So, arrays rock. –  千里ちゃん Sep 29 '11 at 2:39
1  
Sounds like you still don't know what an array is. The type of string manipulation you are talking about doesn't need arrays, and JavaScript does have several string functions to extract parts of a string (e.g., substr()) I'm not familiar with the book you're working from, but it probably has a chapter on arrays so I suggest you read that. –  nnnnnn Sep 29 '11 at 3:08
    
Good idea. Thanks, nnnnnn. Cool name. Is there an append function? Is there a string multiplication function? I have been told this stuff isn't built in. Really, I guess a list of functions having to do with string would be best. developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/…. I'm going to try a method using slices. They don't have any built-in string multiplication, unfortunately. I have to write my own function for that. –  千里ちゃん Sep 29 '11 at 4:19

This should work

var stringBuilder = "";
counter = 0;
signs = "#";
while (counter < 10){
  stringBuilder = stringBuilder + signs + "\n";
  signs = signs + "#";
  counter = counter + 1;
}
alert(stringBuilder);
  1. Newline is backslash and "n"
  2. You need only one newline character that is within the loop
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Cool beard. –  千里ちゃん Sep 29 '11 at 2:43

The following code should work:

string = "";
counter = 0;
signs = "#";
while (counter < 10){
  string = string + signs + "\n";
  signs = signs + "#";
  counter = counter + 1;
}
alert(string);

The major differences are as follows:

  • You can't include the newline character in the string you are building, otherwise newlines from previous iterations will still be included in subsequent iterations.
  • The newline character is \n and not /n.
  • string can start off as being empty, since you will be appending a "#" each time.
share|improve this answer
    
I noticed this, too, a little later. Thanks, Jonathan, for the edit. –  千里ちゃん Sep 29 '11 at 2:40

Your first pound-sign (tip of pyramid) should be spaced half the length of your base of your pyramid. So, if your base is 10 # signs long, then the top of your pyramid should be spaced out to 4 spaces then print the # sign.

Second, to make a true pyramid, you'll need to print top to bottom so your second row is progressively getting larger. Think in odd numbers:

// Example
Tip: 1 char
2nd row: 3 chars 
3rd row: 5 chars
4th row: 7 chars
5th row: 9 chars
6th row: 11 chars

etc

Your newline character is wrong. It should be a \n. If printing to HTML, then use <BR>.

Alternatively, you can use console.log to print your characters.

share|improve this answer
    
Cool. Another exercise. Console.log doesn't work in my interpreter. –  千里ちゃん Sep 29 '11 at 2:41

This would be another way to do it:

<script>
string = ""; height = 10;
for(i = 1; i <= height; i++){
    string += Array(i).join('#') + '<br>';
}
document.write(string);
</script>

Output:

#
##
###
####
#####
######
#######
########
#########

Now with some more modification:

<script>
string = ""; height = 10;
for(i = 1; i <= height; i++){
    string += Array(height-i+1).join('&nbsp;') + Array(2*i).join('#') + '<br>';
}
document.write(string);
</script>
<style>body{font-family:monospace;}</style>

You get this:

         #
        ###
       #####
      #######
     #########
    ###########
   #############
  ###############
 #################
###################
share|improve this answer
    
without arrays, only. –  千里ちゃん Sep 29 '11 at 2:44
1  
Hi 千里ちゃん and I'm sorry. You already had several answers right so I just wanted to add another way to do it as stated. –  derp Sep 29 '11 at 2:53
    
Cool. Hey, I like the triangle with the spaces. Thanks. Sorry, I don't understand arrays very well. Trying to figure out how they work on the back end. –  千里ちゃん Sep 29 '11 at 4:05
1  
Array(10).join('#') is basically equivalent to str_repeat("#", 9); in php, it's a way to repeat a character multiple times. Anyway, ganbare! ah one more thing, while checking the website of the book you mentioned (eloquentjavascript.net/chapter1.html) If you look at the bottom right you'll see the word console, click it and you can test your code there (including print), also in every example there's a button to execute the code in that console. jaa ne~ –  derp Sep 29 '11 at 4:37
1  
str_repeat is php, php.net/manual/es/function.str-repeat.php, it takes a string and repeats it n times. I saw you made some questions on php so I thought it would be a good reference. –  derp Sep 29 '11 at 16:02

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