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my code is as follows:

public static void Output<T>(IEnumerable<T> dataSource) where T : class
        {   
          dataSourceName = (typeof(T).Name);
           switch (dataSourceName)
            {
                case (string)typeof(CustomerDetails).Name.ToString(); :
                    var t = 123;
                    break;
                default:
                    Console.WriteLine("Test");
            }
}

But this is not working the case statement is giving me a error saying that a constant variable is expected. Please help guys thank you!

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possible duplicate of C# - Is there a better alternative than this to 'switch on type'? –  user166390 Sep 29 '11 at 6:42

5 Answers 5

See C# switch statement limitations - why?

Basically Switches cannot have evaluated statements in the case statement. They must be statically evaluated.

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This is not true in VB.net... I am trying to convert a code which already have this kind of case values (basically methods calls) –  Moslem Ben Dhaou Jan 8 at 19:53
    
@Moslem Ben Dhaou yes C# Switch is definitely not equivalent to the VB Case statement. For Case statements you can use expressions (function calls, variables, etc) whereas C# needs constant values (no function calls, variables, etc). The switch statement is quite limited comparably. –  deepee1 Jan 8 at 22:54

You can only match to constants in switch-statements.

Example:

switch (variable)
{
    case 0:
        //Code
        break;
    default:
        //Code
        break;
}

works, but

switch (variable)
{
    case sameothervarialbe:
        //Code
        break;
    default:
        //Code
        break;
}

doesn't

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2  
As an additional note: "const int myConstant = 3" counts as a constant, but "readonly static int myReadonlyStatic = 3" doesn't. –  statue Dec 31 '13 at 20:13

switch is very picky in the sense that the values in the switch must be a compile time constant. and also the value that's being compared must be a primitive (or string now). For this you should use an if statement.

The reason may go back to the way that C handles them in that it creates a jump table (because the values are compile time constants) and it tries to copy the same semantics by not allowing evaluated values in your cases.

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Johnnie, Please go through msdn guide on switch. Also, the C# language specification clearly defines the compile time error case:

• If the type of the switch expression is sbyte, byte, short, ushort, int, uint, long, ulong, bool, char, string, or an enum-type, or if it is the nullable type corresponding to one of these types, then that is the governing type of the switch statement.

• Otherwise, exactly one user-defined implicit conversion (§6.4) must exist from the type of the switch expression to one of the following possible governing types: sbyte, byte, short, ushort, int, uint, long, ulong, char, string, or, a nullable type corresponding to one of those types.

• Otherwise, if no such implicit conversion exists, or if more than one such implicit conversion exists, a compile-time error occurs.

Hope this helps.

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You can't use a switch statement for this as the case values cannot be evaluated expressions. For this you have to use an an if/else ...

public static void Output<T>(IEnumerable<T> dataSource) where T : class
        {   
          dataSourceName = (typeof(T).Name);
           if(string.Compare(dataSourceName, typeof(CustomerDetails).Name.ToString(), true)==0)
           {
                var t = 123;
           }
           else if (/*case 2 conditional*/)
           {
               //blah
           }
           else
           {
               //default case
               Console.WriteLine("Test");
           }
}

I also took the liberty of tidying up your conditional statement ... there is no need to cast to string after calling ToString() ... this will always return a string anyway. When comparing strings for equality, bare in mind that using the == operator will result in a case sensitive comparison. Better to use string compare = 0 with the last argument to set case sensitive on/off.

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